September 25, 2007

Sept. 25, 2007


  • Advocates of taming traffic through Terrebonne on Highway 97 received good news this week when the Oregon Department of Transportation agreed to lower speeds entering, and in the middle of, town. The change will be slight -- from 50 mph to 45 on the outskirts, from 40 mph to 35 inside -- but future road improvements such as sidewalks are hoped to increase pedestrian safety.
  • A dedication will be held for Stack Park Saturday, Sept. 29, at 10 a.m. Privately held and maintained for years by Dr. Roger Stack, the park has been donated to the city by the family. The park is located at the corners of Northwest Canyon Road and Kingwood.
  • Redmond's Art/Walk/Explore third Friday event will take a breather for the winter after Nov. 15. Organizers plan on bringing the downtown event back when weather improves, hoping to add improvements to the art walk as well.

Redmond High School sports briefs

photo by Gary Newman/copyright Redmond Spokesman

Girls Soccer

The Lady Panthers improved to 2-1 in CVC soccer play Sept. 20 with a 4-0 win over North Salem.
Redmond had a 29-0 advantage on shots and kept the ball in play on the North Salem half of the field for most of the game.
Sarah Sorenson scored Redmond’s first goal about 20 minutes into the game from 25 yards, putting the ball into the net over the head of the goalie. She was assisted by Sydney Tucker. Tucker assisted Crystal Foster on another goal five minutes before the half.
Tucker improved the Redmond side of the ledger with another goal moments into the second half on an assist by Allison Coughlin. Foster scored a second goal on a pass from Chelsea Gibbs.
Redmond dropped its second CVC soccer match 5-0 at South Salem, Wednesday. The Lady Panthers trailed 1-0 at the half, but gave up two goals early in the second half. The game was rescheduled from Tuesday because of bus problems.
Redmond hosts West Salem Friday.

Boys Soccer

Redmond pushed its Central Valley Conference boys soccer record to 2-1 with a 4-1 win over North Salem Friday, Sept. 21. Redmond is 2-2 overall.
Renan Flores scored Redmond’s first goal late in the first half and started a trend, with two more goals following in the next seven minutes. Clinton Cranston followed with a goal in the 32nd minute and Stephen Gipson in the 34th. Cranston topped off the scoring with a goal in the 52nd minute. Andrew Velasquez contributed 10 saves.
Redmond knocked off defending Central Valley Conference champions South Salem 2-1 Sept. 18.
Slade Menold notched the go-ahead goal for the Panthers about 20 minutes into the game off a cross by Lucio Nemecio. Redmond went up 2-0 12 minutes into the second half with a goal by Junior Garcia with an assist by Clinton Cranston.
South Salem spent most of the second half on the attack, but didn’t score until Jose Reyes scored in the last five minutes.
“When we had the ball we played well,” said Redmond coach Hector West. “They’re a great team and they showed it a couple of times. They had a couple of good closes especially in the second half.”
The boys travel to West Salem Saturday.


Volleyball

Redmond took South Salem to four games Sept. 18, in a 3-1 loss to the Lady Saxons.
The Lady Panthers lost 25-16, 25-11 before pulling out the third game 16-25. Redmond led much of the fourth game before falling 25-20.
Hanna Durighello had nine kills and Taylor Rodby eight in the match.
Redmond dropped another CVC game at North Salem Friday. The Panthers carried the game to five sets, losing the opener 25-18 then winning 22-25 and 20-25. But North Salem pulled out the final two games 25-11, 25-9.
Redmond plays at West Salem Friday.


Cross Country

Kris Thomasberg took individual honors at the Cold Springs Invitational near Sisters, Sept. 19, but the rest of the Redmond girls team was disqualified for making a wrong turn on the course. Thomasberg ran the 5,000 meter race in 20:50.
Paden Snell led the Redmond boys with a seventh place finish in 18:52. Trent Pitts placed 11th in 19:43. Rounding out the top five, Jared Lambert was 13th in 20:06, Ryan Wilson 15th in 20:29 and Colby Whitaker 19th in 21:03.
Redmond travels to the Trask Invitational near McMinnville, Saturday. They compete in the Puma Invitational at Drake Park, Oct. 6.

Sept. 26, 2007 Obituaries

Deeris Asenith Brown
May 13, 1907-Sept. 15, 2007

Deeris Asenith Brown, 100, of Madras, died Sept. 15, 2007.
A Celebration of Life service will be held Saturday, Sept. 29, 1:30 p.m., in the First Baptist Church, corner of Sixth and A Street, in Madras.
Mrs. Brown was born May 13, 1907, in Madras to Mr. and Mrs. L.L. Nichols. She attended elementary school at Trail Crossing and high school in Redmond. She married Archie M. Brown on June 25, 1925. She was active in the Sisters Rebekah Lodge and the Christian Church in Sisters. She moved to Dallas, Ore., in 1963, where she and her husband were active in the Pee Dee Evangelical Church.
Survivors include her sons Paul W. Brown of Madras, and Roy R. Brown of Yakima, Wash.; nine grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband Archie, daughter Lorraine Wire and grandson Michael Brown.
Memorial contributions can be made to Mountain View Hospice,
470 N.E. A St., Madras, OR, 97741.
Bollman Funeral Home in
Dallas, Ore., handled the arrangements.


Billy Daymond Mullins
May 7, 1945-Sept. 18, 2007

Redmond resident Billy Daymond Mullins, 62, died Sept. 18, 2007.
No services will be held at this time.
Mr. Mullins was born May 7, 1945, in Long Beach, Calif., to Daymond and Glenda Mullins. He earned a bachelor’s degree and served in the Marine Corps. He married his wife Phyllis in Newport Beach, Calif., in 1992. He moved from Southern California to Redmond two years ago.
He enjoyed fishing, driving his RV and loved his dogs.
Survivors include his wife Phyllis Mullins of Redmond; sons Robert Mullins of Long Beach, Calif.; Jason Mullins of Huntington Beach, Calif.; and Ryan Glaze of Riverside, Calif.; and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his mother and a sister.
Memorial contributions can be made to the March of Dimes, www.marchofdimes.com.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Clarice Pettibone
Nov. 18, 1913-Sept. 9, 2007

Former Redmond resident and longtime Jefferson County resident Clarice Pettibone, 93, died Sept. 9, 2007.
A Celebration of Life service was held Sept. 22 in Madras.
Mrs. Pettibone was born Nov. 18, 1913, in Louis Creek, B.C., Canada, to Frank and Gussie (Banta) Corwin. The family moved to Jefferson County in 1920 and lived near Culver and Hay Creek. Corwin Arena at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds is named after her father and she was the granddaughter of Jefferson County pioneers John and Sarah (Cook) Corwin. She graduated from Madras Union High School in 1932 and married Clair Osborn in Bend on Dec. 16, 1939. They farmed in Crooked River Ranch, Grizzly and Culver and moved to Redmond in1958. She was a meat wrapper and clerk for Erickson’s and a checker for Safeway. Her husband Clair died in 1966 and she graduated from Phagan’s Beauty College in Bend in 1967. She married Arnold Pettibone in Las Vegas, Nev., on Oct. 16, 1968. They lived in Culver and he died in November 1975.
She was a member of the Our Day Out club in Culver and enjoyed fishing, politics, spending time with her family and watching the Portland Trailblazers.
Survivors include her sons Ronald Corwin of Albany and Rob Osborn of Madras; daughter Janet Franks of Spokane, Wash.; eight grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. In addition to her husbands, she was preceded in death by four brothers and a sister.
Memorial contributions can be made to Mountain View Home Health and Hospice, 470 N.E. A St., Madras, OR, 97741.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Billy Daymond Mullins
May 7, 1945-Sept. 18, 2007

Redmond resident Billy Daymond Mullins, 62, died Sept. 18, 2007.
No services will be held at this time.
Mr. Mullins was born May 7, 1945, in Long Beach, Calif., to Daymond and Glenda Mullins. He earned a bachelor’s degree and served in the Marine Corps. He married his wife Phyllis in Newport Beach, Calif., in 1992. He moved from Southern California to Redmond two years ago.
He enjoyed fishing, driving his RV and loved his dogs.
Survivors include his wife Phyllis Mullins of Redmond; sons Robert Mullins of Long Beach, Calif., Jason Mullins of Huntington Beach, Calif., and Ryan Glaze of Riverside, Calif.; and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his mother and a sister.
Memorial contributions can be made to the March of Dimes, www.marchofdimes.com.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Lucile Pearl Lynds
May 5, 1915-Sept. 17, 2007

Former Redmond resident Lucile Pearl Lynds, 92, died Sept. 17, 2007.
A funeral service was held Sept. 24 in the Deschutes Memorial Chapel. Entombment followed in the Deschutes Memorial Mausoleum.
Mrs. Lynds was born May 5, 1915, in Macdoel, Calif., to Preston and Verna (Schillingburg) Nine. She graduated from Klamath Falls as class valedictorian in 1932. She married Richard E. Lynds in Klamath Falls on Nov. 29, 1934. She was a homemaker. She and her husband owned a ranch in south Redmond for many years. She lived in Deschutes County for 68 years and lived in Bend at the time of her death.
She attended the Foursquare Church in Redmond and the Redmond Assembly of God Church and was a 4-H leader for 25 years. She was a member of the Pleasant Ridge Home Extension Unit, Juniper Garden Club, the Assembly Stitchers and was a Sunday school superintendent. She enjoyed gardening flowers and vegetables and often gave fresh flowers to her church and enjoyed traveling with her husband.
Survivors include her son Norman Lynds of Snohomish, Wash.; daughters Velma Levine of Bend, Vivian Williams of Wasilla, Alaska.; Marilyn Brinton of Prineville, Carla La Brosse of The Dalles, Sherrill Lynds of Bend; sister Lois Ingle of Grants Pass; 10 grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband and a brother. Memorial contributions can be made to Gideon’s Society, P.O. Box 114, Redmond, OR, 97756.
Deschutes Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Larry Jack Williams
March 11, 1942-Sept. 19, 2007

Former Redmond resident Larry Jack Williams, 65, died Sept. 19, 2007.
A Celebration of Life gathering will be held in Brooks. No formal funeral service will be held.
Mr. Williams was born March 11, 1942, in Redmond to Ransome and Ellen Williams.
Survivors include his wife Diana of Jefferson; several sons and daughters; his mother Ellen Williams; and several brothers, sisters and grandchildren.
North Santiam Funeral Service in Stayton handled the arrangements.

Dona Jean Woltering
Dec. 10, 1931-Sept. 17, 2007

Redmond resident Dona Jean Woltering, 75, died Sept. 17, 2007.
A memorial service was held Sept. 22 in Autumn Funerals in Redmond.
Mrs. Woltering was born Dec. 10, 1931, in Colton, Calif., to Arthur and Elizebeth (Beason) Nolan. She married James Woltering on April 17, 1954, in St. Louis, Mo. She worked as a program coordinator in public service and helped rehabilitate inmates in state and federal penitentiaries. She moved to Redmond from Minneapolis, Minn., in November 2004 and worked for I-Sky in Bend for two years.
She enjoyed beading, gardening and spending time with her family.
Survivors include her husband James Woltering of Redmond; sons David Woltering of Cottage Grove, Minn., Michael Woltering of Crooked River Ranch, and Scott Woltering of Champlin, Minn.; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.
Memorial contributions can be made to Hospice Center Bend La Pine, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR, 97701.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Rex Julian
Oct. 1, 1919-Sept. 17, 2007

Former Redmond resident Rex Julian, 87, of Prineville, died Sept. 19, 2007.
A memorial service was held Sept. 22 at the Prineville Funeral Home.
Mr. Julian was born in Redmond on Oct. 1, 1919, to Albert and Anne B. (Despain) Julian. He moved to Lyons at the age of 14 and graduated from Mill City High School in 1937. After high school, he traveled across the U.S., and spent time in New Orleans, La., where he met and socialized with Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne and Billie Holliday. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Oregon Agricultural College (now Oregon State University) in 1942. He played as a defensive end for the college football team and later played professionally for the L.A. Rams, the California Bears and Quantico Marines. After college he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and the Navy and served until 1946. He was supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the Grain Division for 11 western states and retired in 1975. He raised Arabian horses in Washougal, Wash., and moved to Sprague River in 1982. He moved to Oregon City in 1984 and then to Prineville in 1994. He married Carol Hanshew in Bend on March 29, 1986.
He was an avid fisherman and a member of the OSU Presidents Club, and was a Beaver Believer and OSU football fan.
Survivors include his wife Carol Hanshew-Julian of Prineville. He was preceded in death by his parents, one brother, one sister, and stepson Scott Winslow in 2006.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 N.E. Elm St., Prineville, OR, 97754.
Prineville Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

September 18, 2007

Sept. 19, 2007 Obituaries

Harold Clayton Achison
June 3, 1921-Sept. 6, 2007

Redmond resident Harold Clayton Achison, 87, died Sept. 6, 2007.
A graveside service was held Sept. 17 in the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.
Mr. Achison was born June 3, 1921, in Portland to Clarence and Martha (Murray) Achison.
He served as a SeaBee in the Navy during World War II. He worked as a commercial sign painter for 40 years and lived in Redmond for 10 years.
He was recently baptized and enjoyed spending time with his family.
Survivors include his son Clayton Allen Achison of Salkum, Wash.; daughter Kellie James of Salkum, Wash.; sister Jean Jones of Orlando, Fla.; and one grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents.
Memorial contributions can be made to Disabled American Veterans, Attn: Gift Processing, P.O. Box 14301, Cincinnati, OH, 45250-0301.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Jonas Alan Hammack
Oct. 2, 1914-Sept. 6, 2007

Redmond resident Jonas Alan Hammack, 92, died Sept. 6, 2007.
A celebration of life service was held at his home Sept. 12.
Mr. Hammack was born Oct. 2, 1914, in Big Bend, Mont., to John and Emma Hammack. He married Annie J. Bilodeau in Bend on Oct. 28, 1939. He was a section foreman for Santiam Junction and maintenance supervisor for the Oregon Department of Transportation for 42 years.
Survivors include his sons Alan Hammack of Costa Rica and Pat Hammack of Bend; daughter Rose Gallant of Redmond; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by his wife, five brothers, three sisters and one great-granddaughter.
Memorial contributions can be made to Hospice of Redmond & Sisters, 732 S.W. 23rd Ave., Redmond, 97756, or the National Parkinson Foundation, Office of Development, 1501 N.W. Ninth Ave., Bob Hope Rd., Miami, FL, 33136-1494.
Deschutes Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Alva Grey Hudson
May 29, 1917-Sept. 13, 2007

Redmond resident Alva Grey Hudson, 90, died at his home Sept. 13, 2007.
A funeral service was held Sept. 17 in the Redmond First Church of God. Burial followed in the Redmond Memorial Cemetery.
Mr. Hudson was born May 29, 1917, in Parthenon, Ark., to Ira and Mae (Reynolds) Hudson. He married Alta Fern Donner March 11, 1938, in Sandpoint, Idaho. They would have celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary next year. He began his career as a pastor at the Church of God in Anderson, Ind. He was a pastor in Bremerton, Wash., then in Coquille and moved to Bend in 1958 and became the pastor for the Church of God in Bend. He pastored churches in Redmond in the 1970s, and in Prineville in the 1980s.
He enjoyed fishing, hunting and woodworking.
Survivors include his wife Alta Fern Hudson of Redmond; sons Gordon Hudson of Portland and Gary Hudson of Redmond; daughters Verna Mae Van Calcar of McMinnville and Alva Jean Roberts of Redmond; brothers Garnett Hudson of Vancouver, Wash., and Orba Hudson of Yakima, Wash.; sisters Maxine Uhlig of Pendleton, Mary Jean Dowell and JoAnn Hubbard, both of Bremerton, Wash., and Lila Roediger of Little Rock, Ark.; 12 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter Mary Ellen Hudson, and four siblings.
Memorial contributions can be made to the Youth Fund, care of the First Church of God, 818 N.W. Elm Ave., Redmond, 97756.
Redmond Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Walter M. Knox
Jan. 5, 1922-Sept. 11, 2007

Redmond resident Walter M. Knox, 85, died at his home Sept. 11, 2007.
A memorial service was held Sept. 15 in the Redmond Memorial Chapel. Private burial will be held in the Willamette National Cemetery.
Mr. Knox was born Jan. 5, 1922, in Portland to Roscoe and Edith (Mays) Knox. He served in the Navy for six and a half years during World War II and was a Pearl Harbor survivor. He worked for the Oregon State Highway Department for 30 years before moving to Madras. In Madras, he owned a water trucking business and contracted with Warm Springs. He moved to Redmond 14 years ago. He married Jeanne Ringler in Bend on Jan. 24, 1982.
He enjoyed square dancing and old cars.
Survivors include his wife Jeanne of Redmond; several children; sister Takla Yeasen of Klamath Falls; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Memorial contributions can be made to the Central Oregon Pearl Harbor Survivors Association Chapter Five, 52192 Elderberry Lane, La Pine, OR, 97739.
Redmond Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Gerardo E. Martinez
March 31, 1933-Sept. 8, 2007

Terrebonne resident Gerardo E. Martinez, 74, died Sept. 8, 2007.
A graveside service will be held Wednesday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m., in the Deschutes Memorial Gardens.
Mr. Martinez was born March 31, 1933, in Monte Vista, Colo., to Lee and Alberia (Salazar) Martinez. He married Betty Smith in Madras on July 25, 1981. He was a supervisor for various frozen food companies for 27 years and worked for Target Stores for 10 years.
He enjoyed wood scrolling, craft shows, traveling and being with his family.
Survivors include his wife Betty Martinez of Terrebonne; sons Patrick, David, Michael and Paul Martinez, all of Pueblo, Colo., and Ted Martinez of Redmond; daughters Della Russo of Crooked River Ranch, Diane Deherra, Gloria Salazar and Michelle Ponce, all of Pueblo, Colo., Fonda McMellon of Redmond, Tina Curran of Greenfield, Calif., Billie Jean Gullickson of Homer, Alaska, and Dana Hinton of Vacaville, Calif.; brothers Ben of Colorado and Porfi of Washington; 26 grandchildren; and many great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents.
Memorial contributions can be made to a charity of one’s choice or to Hospice of Redmond & Sisters, 732 S.W. 23rd Ave., Redmond, 97756.
Deschutes Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Jeffrey Allen Moltzau
Oct. 23, 1964-Sept. 11, 2007

Jeffrey “Jeff” Allen Moltzau, 42, of Bend, died of natural causes Sept. 11, 2007.
A memorial service was held Sept. 15 in the Redmond Memorial Chapel. A celebration of life gathering followed in his parents’ home in Prineville.
Mr. Moltzau was born Oct. 23, 1964, in Eugene to Jerry and Bev (Porter) Moltzau. He graduated from Mountain View High School in Bend in1983 and attended Central Oregon Community College. He married Lezlie Aiken in Bend on Feb. 5, 2000. He worked for Izzy’s Restaurant, and worked for Food For Less for eight years, Eberhardt’s Dairy for five years, Triple Crown for two years and also worked for Frito-Lay.
He lived almost his entire life in Bend and was a Roman Catholic. He loved the outdoors, especially the Three Sisters and Deschutes River. He enjoyed watching NASCAR, spending time with his family and friends, traveling, beach combing and staying in his family’s cabin. He loved his dogs and cats and his 1971 Chevelle.
Survivors include his wife Lezlie Moltzau of Bend; parents Jerry and Bev Moltzau of Prineville; stepson Ryan Littlefield of Bend; stepdaughter Lexie Littlefield of Redmond; and brothers Steve Moltzau of Prineville and Chris Moltzau of Redmond.
Memorial contributions can be made to the Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 S.E. 27th St., Bend, OR, 97702.
Redmond Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


James Curtis Pence
Nov. 30, 1937-Sept. 9, 2007

Redmond resident James Curtis Pence, 69, died Sept. 9, 2007.
No services will be held at this time.
Mr. Pence was born Nov. 30, 1937, in Garrison, Ky., to William and Nora (Crane) Pence. He married Edna Lattin in Stevenson, Wash., on June 18, 1961. He worked in construction most of his life.
He was a member of the NRA and Black Powder in Redmond. He enjoyed hunting, shooting, fishing, gardening, riding four-wheelers, spending time with his two dogs and donating his time and toys to children.
Survivors include his wife Edna Pence of Redmond; son Conrad Pence of Klamath Falls; daughters Cathie Sue Washer of Jefferson City, Tenn., Christina Schwerbel of Terrebonne, and Athena Pence; sisters Marty Drew and Carol Powell, both of Portland; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.


Clarice Pettibone
Nov. 18, 1913-Sept. 9, 2007

Former Redmond resident and longtime Jefferson County resident Clarice Pettibone, 93, died Sept. 9, 2007.
A Celebration of Life service will be held Saturday, Sept. 22, 2 p.m., in the Aspen Court Assisted Living Center, 470 N.E. Oak St., Madras.
Mrs. Pettibone was born Nov. 18, 1913, in Louis Creek, B.C., Canada, to Frank and Gussie (Banta) Corwin. The family moved to Jefferson County in 1920 and lived near Culver and Hay Creek. Corwin Arena at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds is named after her father and she was the granddaughter of Jefferson County pioneers John and Sarah (Cook) Corwin. She graduated from Madras Union High School in 1931 and married Clair Osborn in Bend on Dec. 16, 1939. They farmed in Crooked River Ranch, Grizzly and Culver and moved to Redmond in1958. She was a meat wrapper and clerk for Erickson’s and a checker for Safeway. Her husband Clair died in 1966 and she graduated from Phagan’s Beauty College in Bend in 1967. She married Arnold Pettibone in Las Vegas, Nev., on Oct. 16, 1968. They lived in Culver and he died in November 1975.
She was a member of the Our Day Out club in Culver and enjoyed fishing, politics, spending time with her family and watching the Portland Trailblazers.
Survivors include her sons Ronald Corwin of Albany and Jere Osborn of Madras; daughter Janet Franks of Spokane, Wash.; 13 grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. In addition to her husbands, she was preceded in death by four brothers and a sister.
Memorial contributions can be made to Mountain View Home Health and Hospice, 470 N.E. A St., Madras, OR, 97741.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.


Melvin Lee Usher
Nov. 27, 1921-Sept. 1, 2007

Redmond resident Melvin Lee Usher, 85, died of cancer Sept. 1, 2007.
A memorial service will be held at a later date.
Mr. Usher was born Nov. 27, 1921, in Bend to John and Lela (Bell) Usher. He grew up in Ontario and graduated from high school there in 1941. He served in the Navy during World War II for three years. He married Winifred L. Dunbar in Payette, Idaho, on Aug. 26, 1942. They recently celebrated their 65th anniversary. He completed the Central Oregon Community College auto technician program in 1961. He worked for Brooks Scanlon and Mid Oregon Motors (now Carrera Motors) and worked for Powroll Performance, a motorcycle parts manufacturer. He retired in 1987.
He enjoyed gold mining, e-mailing family and friends, riding motorcycles, walking his dogs and spending winters in Yuma, Ariz.
Survivors include his wife Winifred Usher; son M. Craig Usher of Redmond; daughters Wendy Olmstead of Terrebonne and Carol Digiorgio of California; 10 grandchildren; and 31 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and a sister.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.


Donald Michael Stanton
April 17, 1916-Sept. 9, 2007

Redmond resident Donald Michael Stanton, 91, died Sept. 9, 2007.
No services will be held at this time.
Mr. Stanton was born April 17, 1916, in Columbus, Mont., to Edward Bert and Viola (DuBois) Stanton. He married Marguerito E. Sund on April 11, 1939. He served in the Civilian Conservation Corps during World War II. He worked as a log truck driver and was known as “Swede.” He was an honorary Elk member in Florence for more than 50 years.
He enjoyed golfing, fishing, playing Pinochle and cards and family gatherings.
Survivors include his sons Bob Stanton of Redmond and Pete Stanton of Roseburg; daughters Diana Titus of Redmond and Sharon Doggett of Crooked River Ranch; sisters Doris Sprinkel of Corvallis and Gwen Umbras of West Linn; brother Kenneth Stanton of Corvallis, Ore.; 11 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife and a son.
Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.


Bob Bender
Sept. 14, 1941-Sept. 13, 2007

Redmond resident Bob Bender, 65, died at his home Sept. 13. 2007, after a lengthy illness. Private services will be held at a later date.
Mr. Bender was born Sept. 14, 1941, in Ohio to Charles and Helen (Eure) Bender. He came to Redmond in 1977 from Colorado and Sept. 12, 1978, he married Teri Gaston in Redmond. He worked in telecommunications and electronics for many years and the past 10 years he spent in the engraving business.
He is survived by his wife Teri Bender of Redmond.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of Redmond-Sisters.
Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of the arrangements.

Keith Concannon
Jan. 1, 1921-Sept. 14, 2007

Redmond resident Keith Concannon, 86, died Sept. 14, 2007 of natural causes.
A service will be held at 11 a.m. Sept. 22 at Redmond Memorial Chapel.
Mr. Concannon was born Jan. 1, 1921, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to Harry and Lelia (Mylon) Concannon. He served in the U.S. Army during WWII and married Evelyn Cooper April 4, 1948, in Cedar Rapids. He worked for Orange County in California and was a board member of the Orange County Retired Employees Association. He moved to Redmond four years ago. He enjoyed trains of all kinds and working on genealogy.
He was preceded in death by a brother, James Concannon.
Survivors include his wife Evelyn Concannon and son Greg, both of Redmond; daughter Diane Concannon-Turk of Woodinville, Wash., and five grandchildren.
Memorial Contributions may be made to the American Heart Association.
Redmond Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Dr. Jennings O. Borgen
Oct. 21, 1914-Sept. 15, 2007

Redmond resident Jennings Olander Borgen, 92, died Sept. 15, 2007, of natural causes.
He was born Oct. 21, 1914 on a farm near Crooks, S.D., to Olai and Alma (Bjorgan) Borgen. After graduating from Washington High School in Sioux Falls, S.D., he received a pharmacy degree from South Dakota State University in 1939. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII, afterwards studying medicine at the University of South Dakota. He graduated from University of Washington Medical School in 1950, with the first class of physicians. Dr. Borgen was board certified in general surgery and OB-GYN, practicing medicine in North Bend, Issaquah, and Seattle, where he was a longtime staff doctor at Virginia Mason Hospital.
He was an accomplished writer whose articles appeared in medical journals and the popular press, as well as a researcher and teacher. He held patents on a uniquely reversible birth control device and in 1987 he was awarded South Dakota State University’s Distinguished Alumni Award for Professional Achievement.
He married Claris H. Oien in 1940 in Sioux Falls. They moved to Seattle in 1948 and lived in Meadowbrook for a short time before moving to North Bend in 1952. In 1966 they returned to Seattle and in 2004 he moved to Redmond to be near his son.
Dr. Borgen served on the Sno-Valley School Board and was a member of the Unity Mason Lodge, Scottish Rite and Nile Shriners. He enjoyed playing golf, the violin and the piano, taking piano lessons up until the last month of this life.
He was preceded in death by his wife and brothers Ivan and Harold.
Survivors include son Jim Borgen of Redmond and two grandchildren.
Redmond Memorial Chapel and Evergreen Washelli handled the arrangements.


Marie Louise Snyder
Oct. 18, 1916-Sept. 13, 2007

Redmond resident Marie Louise Snyder, 90, died Sept. 13, 2007. Private services will be held at a later date.
She was born Oct. 18, 1916, in Beckemeyer, Ill., to George and Ella (Klaesener) Schelot. She was married to Robert W. Snyder in Terre Haute, Ind. Sept. 25, 1938, and moved to Portland, Ore., in 1957. In 1992 she moved to Redmond.
Mrs. Snyder was preceded in death by her husband and her siblings.
Survivors include daughters Pam Heere and Linda Gilbo, both of Redmond; Barbara Carroll of Mexico, son Ron Snyder of Charleston, S.C., nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.
Memorials can be sent to Hospice of Redmond-Sisters, 732 NW 23rd, Redmond, Ore., 97756.
Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of the arrangements.


Mary A Russo
Nov. 24, 1916-Sept. 15, 2007

Crooked River Ranch resident Mary Russo, 90, died Sept. 15, 2007, at Brookside House in Redmond. A recitation of the Rosary will be held Thursday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at Bel-Air Memorial Chapel in Madras. A graveside service will be held Friday, Sept. 21 at 11 a.m. at Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend.
Mrs. Russo was born Nov. 24, 1916, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to Michael and Elizabeth LaBohn. She married John Russo April 28, 1945, in Brooklyn. She came to Central Oregon nine years ago to be near family. She was a homemaker and mother who took great pride in caring for her son and spending time with her grandchildren. She loved Bingo, reading and crocheting.
She was preceded in death by her husband, two brothers and a sister.
Survivors include her son Joseph Russo of Crooked River Ranch, sisters Helen Rizutti and Jennie Da’Amatoo, both of New York; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
Bel-Air Colonial Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.


September 11, 2007

Sept. 12, 2007

  • The city of Redmond is considering increasing System Development Charges, fees attached to new homes in order to offset growth needs in infrastructure, for its park system. A newly completed master plan that targeted future needs based on population estimates revealed that Redmond would need to increase its parks SDCs by three times to generate enough income for future parks expansion.
  • The Redmond Chamber of Commerce has wrapped up its first decade of its summer concert series. Whether or not Music on the Green moves to the city's new amphitheater to under-construction Legion Park has not yet been decided, according to director Eric Sande.

Canal roads prove tricky topic


Redmond Spokesman editorial

There has been much to-do lately in Bend regarding public use of canal easement roads. The debate centers on the difference between private property rights and an “unspoken agreement” that these areas are for public use.

What does any of that have to do with Redmond?

Well, we have canals and we have canal roads and we have frustrated homeowners, irrigation district workers and walkers looking for a nice place to stroll. These issues will only increase with time, especially since the city has put trail development high on its list of master plans for the Redmond parks system.

The confusion – and contention – involved in the canal road debate seems to center on its apparent lack of use. Property owners adjacent to irrigation canals own the land up to the water but must leave the ‘roadway’ open for canal maintenance crews. Landowners cannot build on the easement area or use it in any way that blocks access for canal workers. Because of this restriction on their property many homeowners opt to ‘cut off’ their active property use area from the easement road by a fence or landscaping.

Since waterway maintenance is not an everyday thing – hopefully – this leaves inviting swaths of trail seemingly ‘abandoned’ for public use. And use them they do, walking dogs, hiking, and biking riding right through the backyard of their neighbors.

When asked why they knowingly trespass – most canal roads are posted – walkers usually use the excuse that ‘everyone does it’ and ‘it’s not hurting anyone’, much the same sentiments as expressed by the Deschutes County District Attorney, a regular trespasser on one Bend canal road according to recent news reports.

None of these rationalizations get past the fact that this is a private property matter and one that trespassers would likely view differently if folks were sauntering through their backyard.

Now, are the walkers hurting anything? Mostly not. They don’t typically peer in windows, vandalize or litter. They just walk, or pedal or otherwise enjoy being outside along a nice bubbling waterway. Does this lack of malice give them the right to use the canal roads?

No. Not without direct permission by the every landowner along the trail.

Does this make Redmond’s lofty goal of linked trail systems throughout the city – many on canal easements – a bad idea?

Not at all. But to avoid bickering like Bend is encountering Redmond would be wise to obtain agreements from all landowners, by purchase or contract, for use of their canal-side property – before the first gravel is laid and trailhead signs erected or any further ‘master plans’ are developed. And until that time Redmond residents should show respect for their neighbors and only tread where invited.

The Naked Mountain

photo by Leslie Pugmire Hole/copyright Redmond Spokesman

For years now I have made plans to visit Mt. Bachelor in the summer, enjoying the idea of spectacular views on sunny days and a leisurely ride up a mountainside. Labor Day looming up this year made me realize that this adventure was once more going to pass me by if I didn’t grab the family and head for the lifts.

Having seen several movie versions of the novel “Heidi” about the little Swiss girl living in the Alps, I guess I thought the summer version of normally snowy peaks would be like that: verdant hills covered in wildflowers and lush grass.

As a first-time visitor to Mt. Bachelor last week I was greatly disillusioned. Bachelor, like the rest of the peaks in the Cascades, is a still-youthful (by geological standards) volcano, stark in its rocky blackness.

What did I expect, you say? In my defense, as the only non-skier in my family my experience with ski mountains is nearly non-existent.

For the rest of the family, however, seeing Bachelor bare of all its winter coverings was a revelation. Riding up the quad lifts to the Pine Marten lodge we passed the swaths of cleared hillside that in the winter hosts snowboarders and skiers. We passed the trees that divide the various runs, the now-dusty trough used by snowboarders for aerial tricks and signs warning of out-of-bounds areas. All of it looked new to them, and yet familiar, like a well-frequented river drained of water.

During the trip up the mountain views of the surrounding Cascades lakes area are as spectacular as anticipated. Sparks, Todd and Elk lakes area easily spotted, along with Dutchman’s Flat recreation area and the Cascade Highway, a mere ribbon of asphalt curving through the forest.

Pine Marten Lodge is sited just above the tree line and in the summer looks like a crazed real estate developer built a restaurant on Saturn. Sharp and glistening volcanic rock, occasionally broken up with a particularly tenacious pine tree or alpine plant, surrounds the lodge. Once off the lift hiking trails meander in every direction. The sporadic snow fields undaunted by the summer sun proved too tempting to the skiers in the family, who tried their hand at sneaker skiing with more success than I would have expected.

The café in the lodge is open in the summer, offering typical fare like hamburgers, pizzas, and salads. A patio that runs around three-quarters of the building is a perfect spot for relaxing, sightseeing or taking souvenir photos.

On weekends in the summer Bachelor features sunset dinner packages that include a lift ride up to Scapolo’s Restaurant. Reservations are suggested for dinner.

For all its barren blackness Bachelor is surprisingly full of life in the summer. Chipmunks beg for treats below the deck and humongous crickets compete for who can make the most noise. Hawks soar above and disc golfers scamper up and down the hills like mountain goats.

Golfers? Oh, yeah – Bachelor installs an 18-hole disc golf course on the mountain every summer. Think Frisbees instead of golf balls and metal baskets instead of putting greens and you get the idea. The course begins near the lodge and zigs and zags down the entire mountainside to West Village at the bottom of the Pine Marten lift. Devotees can purchase a summer season pass so they can ride the lift and run down the mountain as long as their lungs hold out. The skiers in the family made vaguely threatening plans to come next summer to play so I checked with the lift operators to ensure my pass would enable me to ride the lift all day while they played golf.

I’ll be back next year when the snow melts in July but I’m not likely to be found running down the mountain unless a bear is chasing me.

-- story by Leslie Pugmire Hole


Dowtown group increases city's loan/grant program

The Redmond Downtown Urban Renewal Advisory Committee has recommended changes to the city's loan and grant programs that would direct more money towards private developers looking to rehabilitate downtown buildings.

The recommendation, made at DURAC's Sept. 9 meeting, must be approved by the Redmond Urban Renewal Board before becoming law.

In the committee's first action, DURAC members approved boosting the city's contribution to the Downtown Property Rehabilitation Loan and Grant Program by changing the ratio of private money to public money from a 7:1 to 4:1. The program, adopted by the city in late 2006, provides up to $50,000 in low-interest loans and $11,500 in grants to eligible projects within the downtown core.

Five loan and grant packages have been approved under the 7:1 formula since the program's inception - including two to buildings owned by members of the advisory committee. Advising the committee, Heather Richards of the city's Community Development Department suggested the 7:1 match might not provide enough incentive to property owners considering renovating their buildings.

Craig Ladkin, a member of DURAC and one of the recipients of city funds, said he was comfortable with a switch to 4:1 but could go no further. Moving to a 3:1 or even a 2:1 match would be likely to attract projects with limited economic merit according to Ladkin, who said he would prefer funds be steered towards more promising projects.

Jean Wood, also a DURAC member and also a recipient of city funds, said 4:1 probably wouldn't be enough to move some projects forward, but she too said he didn't want to drop the ratio further. Wood said she looked at the issue in terms of the rental rates in downtown Redmond, which she described as "not pretty," and unable to support significant investment in existing buildings.

In other matters, the committee approved a recommendation to create a design assistance program for smaller building improvement projects. If adopted by the city council, the program would provide up to 15 hours of professional design assistance to building owners looking to undertake exterior projects such as new signage or awnings.

The city would assemble a list of approved design firms for building owners to work with. Property owners would pay an up-front fee of 10 percent of the total cost of design services, estimated by Richards to be between $1,500 to $2,000. If the property owner went through with the changes suggested by the designer, their upfront money would be refunded.

-- story by Scott Hammers

Sept. 12, 2007 Obituaries

Neva Irene Ferguson
Sept. 5, 1916-Sept. 4, 2007

Redmond resident Neva Irene Ferguson, 90, died Sept. 4, 2007.

A memorial service was held Sept. 6 in the Redmond Community Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Ferguson was born Sept. 5, 1916, Reeder, N.D., to Verne and Florence (Lucas) Hungerford. She was a homemaker and a former employee of the Deschutes County Health Department and the Deschutes County Fair Association. She married Glen Haviland Ferguson in Aberdeen, S.D., on Dec. 8, 1936. He died in 1982. She married Bert G. Ferguson on Aug. 29, 1987.

She was an elder and deacon at the Redmond Community Presbyterian Church and a member of the Redmond Garden Club, the Community Concert Association and the Central Oregon District Hospital Foundation.

Survivors include her husband Bert G. Ferguson; sons Eugene Ferguson, Deryl Ferguson and Roger Ferguson, all of Redmond; daughter Judy Gilberton of Redmond; brother Vernon Hungerford of Houston, Texas; seven grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. In addition to her first husband, she was preceded in death by her parents and one sister.

Autumn Funerals handled the arrangements.

Clayton Julius Kotila
Feb. 27, 1929-Sept. 4, 2007

Terrebonne resident Clayton Julius “Pappy” Kotila, 78, died Sept. 4, 2007.

No services will be held at this time.

Mr. Kotila was born Feb. 27, 1929, in Frederick, S.D., to Oscar and Helen Kotila. He attended school in South Dakota and was given the nickname “Pappy.” He loved flying and bought his first plane at the age of 15. He served in the U.S. Army and later worked in many different trades. He worked for PGE on the line between Washington and California. He was married to his wife Helen for more than 31 years. They divorced but remained friends.

Survivors include his son Daniel Kotila of Prineville; daughter Sheila Kotila of Terrebonne; brother Merlin Kotila of Aberdeen, S.D.; sister Luella Lemmatta of Washington; and one grandson. He was preceded in death by his parents, daughter Carla and a brother.

Bel-Air Colonial Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Dollie Etta Lee
Sept. 23, 1907–Sept. 5, 2007

Redmond resident Dollie Etta Lee, 99, died Sept. 5, 2007.

A funeral service was held in Happy Camp, Calif., Sept. 12. Burial followed in the Happy Camp Cemetery.

Mrs. Lee was born Sept. 23, 1907, in San Saba County, Texas, to James Murdock and Jessie Harriet (White) Daggs. She worked in the fields in Texas as a youth and married Artemas D. “Jim” Harrison in 1924. She married Herman Lee in 1946. She moved from Texas to Happy Camp, Calif., where she lived for more than 40 years. She moved to Oregon just over two years ago to be near her daughter.

She had a good sense of humor and often said a diet of Mountain Dew and junk food helped her live longer. She enjoyed raising flowers and vegetable gardens and loved sharing memories of her life such as covered wagons, rock hounding and panning for gold. She read the Bible often and crocheted many baby blankets for newborns at local hospitals. She said she looked forward to heaven and being with Jesus.

Survivors include her daughter Jessie Christensen of Redmond; and many grandchildren, great grandchildren, and great-great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband Herman, and sons Jim, Chuck, Blackie, and Dock Harrison.

Redmond Memorial Chapel handled the arrangements.


Derick Lloyd Papen
April 8, 1980-Aug. 31, 2007

Redmond resident Derick Lloyd Papen, 27, died in a car accident in Aloha Aug. 31, 2007.

A Celebration of Life service was held Sept. 7 in the Calvin Presbyterian Church in Tigard.

Mr. Papen was born April 8, 1980, in Portland to Danny and Julie Papen. He graduated from Aloha High School in 1998 and moved to Redmond four years ago. He married Jamie Watne in Tigard on May 8, 2004. He worked in customer service.

He loved all outdoor activities and was an OSU Beavers fan.

Survivors include his wife Jamie Papen of Redmond; daughter Jasmine Papen of Redmond; son Joshua Papen of Redmond; mother Julie Papen of Aloha; stepmother Cindy Papen of Tigard; sister Kenna Papen of Tigard; brother Bryan Papen of Tigard; and grandfather John Papen of Sheridan. He was preceded in death by his father in 2004, and three grandparents.

Memorial contributions can be made to his children’s college fund at any Washington Mutual Bank.

Springer and Son Funeral Home in Aloha handled the arrangements.

Ruby P. Lewis
Oct. 16, 1929-Sept. 8, 2007

Redmond resident Ruby Lewis, 77, died Sept. 8, 2007.

A funeral service will be held Saturday, Sept. 15 at 11:30 a.m. at the Highland Baptist Church in Redmond.

Mrs. Lewis was born Oct. 16, 1929, in Leola, Ark., to Thomas and Mabel (Dial) Butler. When she was in 10th grade the family moved to California and in 1948 she married Pete Lewis in Oakland, Calif. While in California she worked in banking and accounting for 20 years. In 1981 she moved to Redmond, where she opened and operated The Fabric Shop until 1985. She moved to Missouri, then Arkansas in 1987. This summer she moved back to Redmond to be near family.

Mrs. Lewis enjoyed ballroom dancing, bowling, sewing, and most especially quilting. Her quilts have gone around the world to needy families. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Melvern, Ark., where she taught Sunday school. In Redmond she belonged to the Highland Baptist Church and was active in the home extension program.

She was preceded in death by her husband and four brothers.

Survivors include son Rick Lewis of Redmond, stepdaughter Beverly Carrara of Boulder Creek, Calif.; brothers Jack Butler of Arkansas., Al Butler of California, Dean Butler of Roseville, Calif., and Don Butler of Liberty Lake, Wash.; sisters Matrid Kelly and Linda Luman of Sacramento, Calif., and Lenore Bain of Arkansas, two grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Memorials may be sent to the Highland Baptist Church Benevolence Fund. Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of the arrangements.


Gerald Dalls Yates
Dec. 4, 1932-Sept. 4, 2007

Crooked River Ranch resident Gerald “Gary” Dallas Yates, 74, died Sept. 4, 2007.

No services will be held at this time.

Mr. Yates was born in Atlanta, N.Y., Dec. 4, 1932, to Frank and Thelma Yates. He served in the U.S. Marines in the 1st Air Wing Division from 1952-1955. He Married Karla Keeney in Henry’s Fork, Idaho, on July 21, 1979.

Mr. Yates worked in National Park Services at Glacier National Park and Pecos National Monument in Santa Fe, N.M., then retired in 1995. He also worked as a cowboy on ranches in the west, authoring two books: “Summits and Trails” and “Jess.”

Gary and Karla climbed and hiked in Glacier National Park, the Cascades, Rocky Mountains, Canadian Rockies, New England, Scotland, volcanoes in Mexico, Himalayas in Nepal, and other places.

He was an avid runner and bicyclist, a true Renaissance man. He also played guitar and violin and was actively involved with Osher Life-long Learning and the Sierra Club.

Survivors include his wife Karla Yates of Crooked River Ranch, stepdaughter Julie Brown of Pocatello, Idaho; and bothers Robert, Victor, and David Yates, all from New York.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Glacier National Park Fund PO Box 5600 Whitefish, MT 59937. Please annotate “Gary Yates Memorial” with donations.

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September 4, 2007

Sept. 5, 2007


  • It looks like enrollment in the Redmond School District will top 7,000 for the first time in its history. Early enrollment reports -- school officials use the Sept. 30 numbers as the most acccurate tally -- are pointing to enrollment spikes at Redmond High School and the city's two northwest schools, Tom McCall and Elton Gregory, as the most notable changes.
  • Redmond city officials are considering increasing some fees charged by the planning department in order to recoup the actual cost of providing the services. Meetings with the public will be held before any final changes are made.
  • Redmond is expected to grow by nearly 800 acres by early 2008, when its latest annexation efforts will take place. All the new acreage is located in the city's northwest quadrant and was "master planned" with the help of consultants.

An unexpected dip

3-year-old Mia, an American Bulldog from Redmond, was eager to fetch during Cascade Swim Center's Dog Swim fundraiser Sept. 1 -- but not so eager to get wet. She tried for some time to retrieve a ball without actually entering the pool, only to find her attempts to walk on water unsuccessful. As soon as her front paws hit the water the rest of her went in, much to her surprise. Owner Megan Lopez said normally Mia isn't so shy around water.
photos by Leslie Pugmire Hole/copyright Redmond Spokesman

Parents still getting Together for Children, years later

Photo by Anthony Diamaano/copyright Redmond Spokesman


Together for Children may be an education and support group for parents and their children birth through age three, but a dozen years after one group of families began meeting for support and fellowship the toddlers are now teenagers and they’re still meeting.

According to the adults, the discipline and communication skills they learned to use years ago with their toddlers remain applicable with teens.

“The teacher said we’d use the same tips for dealing with stubborn 2 –and -3-year-olds again when the kids were teenagers,” said Shena Halderman.

Halderman, Tina Goeser, Valerie Knobel, Cathy Paxton and their families met through Together for Children more than a decade ago. The families found each other as they set out to get parenting information, help and support, and to meet people. They didn’t know each other before that.

Halderman joined Together for Children when her 14-year-old daughter, Beth, was about 18 months old

because she wanted some new parenting tools. When her daughter turned 18 months “it was time to discipline, but I felt like I didn’t know enough,” she said.

Goeser, Knobel and Paxton found TFC when they arrived as new residents to the community with young children and no support systems.

Goeser moved here from out of state with her 2 1/2-year-old son, Mark Alward. He needed to be with other children and there weren’t any in her neighborhood, Goeser said, and it was wintertime.

When Valerie Knobel moved to Redmond she asked about parent groups as a way to meet people.

“I needed some grown-ups,” said Knobel, whose children are Ryan, 17, and Jennifer 14.

Paxton also joined after moving here with her first child. Her nurse practitioner suggested Together for Children.

There were about 10 families in their original “class.” When the families’ youngest children turned four and too old for the birth to three program, the teacher suggested that they set up an alumni group.

“We (the parents) didn’t want to leave,” Halderman said.

The group had potlucks once a month. Originally, they tried to do themed meals from different countries and have the kids research the food and culture, “but that didn’t work, so we just ate,” Paxton laughed.

The gatherings let them support each as parents in the methods and philosophy of Together for Children.

“We kept meeting to remember all the things we’d learned.” Halderman said.

Recently, Halderman went to dinner at a home with children who were 3 and 1 ½. When the mother talked to the children, Halderman recognized the vocabulary she’d learned all those years ago in Together for Children

“It was just what Edie (Jones) taught us,” she said. For example, don’t label children -- call them cautious, a more positive connotation, rather than shy, and give children choices, such as “Would you like to share with your brother or sit in your room?”

“I don’t remember choices. I remember consequences,” said Ryan Knobel.

The elements of the program, such as boundaries and logical consequences for actions, are things the children will use their entire lives, said Beth Ann Wilson, longtime Redmond coordinator.

The women said the families will continue to meet, even as the kids start to leave home.

“We’ve got big plans for when they’re gone,” Paxton said.

Travel or meetings in Hawaii maybe, popped up around the table amidst laughter shared by parents and their teens.

-- Story by Trish Pinkerton

Together for Children (TFC) was created in 1987 as a result of direction by Oregon State Legislators. The pilot program for parents and their children birth through age three was designed to provide early childhood education to the children and education, resources and support to the parents.

Today the state no longer funds Together for Children. It is a non-profit corporation that relies on grants, donations and tuition from participating families. As a result the program in Redmond has languished in recent years, but efforts are under way to revive it. Part of that effort includes finding a new meeting place. In the past TFC met in the Becky Johnson Center, but other programs have expanded and the center is completely full except for a few times that wouldn’t work, said Edie Jones, executive director of Together for Children in Deschutes County.

The program needs a place with a meeting room for parents and an activity room for the children. TFC has all of the supplies and equipment.

“We just need a place to call home,” said Beth Ann Wilson, Redmond coordinator.

While the TFC began as a program for families who were considered at-risk for child abuse, it grew to include all families who were interested in improving their parenting or in need of support.

By combining high-need families with parents experiencing normal anxieties about child rearing, the learning can become richer and the community is strengthened, Wilson said.

“Everybody shares the same experience of getting an 18-month-old dressed and in the car,” she said. “Everybody’s in the same boat being a parent.”

TFC classes run from September until May in three nine-week sessions. The weekly two-hour classes include time for parents and children to do activities together, followed by time apart, where children do activities with early childhood educators, while parents meet for education and discussion of issues they might be going through, Jones explained.

Cost is $350 a year per family with one child. A second child is an additional $50. In Redmond a grant from Deschutes County allows TFC to offer scholarships to reduce the cost.

Registration for this year’s sessions is scheduled for Sept. 12, and a Spanish language class is planned.

For more information on the Together for Children program, to register for classes or to offer classroom space, call Jones at 389-9317.