July 30, 2008

July 30, 2008 updates

Redmond-area 4-H members Alec and Bradley Carter with the swine they will be putting on the auction block Saturday, Aug. 2, at the annual Deschutes County Fair livestock auction.
photo by Trish Pinkerton/copyright Redmond Spokesman

  • 4-H and FFA kids across the county are hoping for the best but prepared for the worst when fair auction time rolls around this Saturday. Auction organizers expect the tough economic times will affect bidding for the market animals raised by the kids, and have advised the youth to be more assertive in letting local businesses and individuals know about their livestock project.
  • The Veterans Way to the new Highway 97 reroute median will soon be a reality but won't cut off access to eastside businesses entirely. ODOT will install the concrete median to limit left-hand turns into individual driveways, but a single opening will allow turns into the 'community driveway' between Mazatlan and Cindy's China Garden restaurants.
  • Redmond Area Park and Recreation District will spend the next month considering the possibility of asking voters to approve a bond for a new recreation center. Consultants hired by the district two years ago to develop preliminary concepts for an expanded pool and recreation facility speculated that a two-pool 80,000-square-foot recreational center would cost just under $30 million.

Events calendar

Horseback riding lessons
Redmond Area Park and Recreation District (RAPRD) is offering horseback riding lessons for kids ages 7-16 at Diane’s Riding Place in Tumalo Saturdays through Aug. 16. Cost is $100. Information: 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org.

Author presentation
Janice Marschner presents a slideshow and talk on her book “Oregon 1859: A Snapshot in Time” Aug. 2 at 6:30 p.m. at Paulina Sprngs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond. Marschner will share Oregon’s history, settlers, bridges and early roads, schools and more. Refreshments will be served. Information: 541-526-1491.

Country Western Dance at VFW

Members and guests are welcome to attend a country western dance at Redmond’s VFW Hall, 1836 SW Veterans Way, Aug. 2, 7-11 p.m.

Fiddlers Jam
The Old Time Fiddlers will jam Sunday, Aug.3, 1-4 p.m., at the VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond. All ages are welcome. Admission is free and donations are gladly accepted. Information: 541-447-5451.

Go Wild! at library
Slightly Illusional, a kids’ performer, will lead an imaginary tour of backyards and parks through magic, puppetry and storytelling at Redmond Public Library, 827 SW Deschutes Ave., Aug. 6 at 1 p.m. The event is for children ages 6-11.

Music on the Green
Central Oregon-based SideHill Band performs country favorites at Redmond Music on the Green Aug. 6, 6-7:30 p.m.at Sam Johnson Park. Food vendors available. Information: 541-923-5191.

OMSI science Adventure Aug. 7
OMSI, together with the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, will host science adventure classes for kids on Thursday, Aug. 7 at Redmond High School Hartman Campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave:
  • Jolts, Volts and Wires, grades 2-6, 9-10 a.m.
  • Dangerous Decibels, grades K-6, 10:15-11:15 a.m.
  • Kiddie Chemistry, grades K-3, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Each class is $15. Information: 541-548-7275.

Environmental awareness for kids

Redmond Area Park and Recreation District is offering several classes and programs for kids in August:

  • PEAK (Promoting Environmental Awareness for Kids), Aug. 7, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., at Sam Johnson Park. Get kids excited about experiencing the natural world. Cost is $5.
  • Cheerleading during Saturday youth soccer games in Redmond. Grades 1-8. Cost is $55. Registration deadline is Aug. 4.
  • Horseback Riding, Aug. 2-3, at the West Powell Butte Equestrian Center. Cost is $50.
  • Kimbers Dance Magic, Aug. 4-29. Cost is $75.
  • Beginning Guitar Lessons, at the RAPRD Activity Center. Ages 12-17, Tuesdays, Aug. 5-26, or Wednesdays, Aug. 6-27. Cost is $100.
  • Trip to Kah-Nee-Ta, Aug. 7. Ages 9-18. Cost $18-23. Transportation provided from the Cascade Swim Center.

Information: 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org.

Make dill pickles and dilly beans
The Deschutes County OSU Extension Service is hosting a class on how to make dill pickles and dilly beans Aug. 19, 9 a.m. to noon, at the OSU Extension office, 3893 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond. Cost is $14. Class size is limited and registration deadline is Aug. 14. Information: 541-548-6088 or e-mail Glenda.hyde@oregonstate.edu.

Dog Days of Summer
Columbia River Bank presents Dog Days of Summer, a festival of live bluegrass, country, rock ‘n’ roll and blues music Aug. 16, from 12 p.m. - 9 p.m. The event in Sam Johnson Park will feature a kids’ area with inflatable rides, food and retail vendors and more.Information: 541-389-1995.

Vendors and crafters wanted for festival
The Redmond Revival Street Festival is looking for vendors with fine arts and crafts for the Aug. 16 celebration of the return of our Sixth Street to the city when the complete reroute opens. Information: 541-420-0283.

Redmond Revival Street Festival
Event kicks off with mimosas and crepes; other activities include face painting, a fun run, pony rides, a Pets, Pals and Pedestrians Parade, live music by the Gospel Choir of the Cascades, Andy Armer’s Jazz Trio and Bellavia.

Ceramics class
Redmond Area Park and Recreation District is offering ceramics classes at Painted People Ceramics, 239 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond, Aug. 12, for ages 4-11; and Aug. 13, for ages 11 and up. Cost is $20. Information: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

Harvest Run
The 15th Annual Drifters Car Club Harvest Run is set for Aug. 15-16 in downtown Redmond. There will be close to 200 classic and custom cars, hot rods, motorcycles and trucks on display. The event kicks off Aug. 15, 6 p.m., with a barbecue and music. Cruising downtown starts at 8 p.m. Activities continue Aug. 16, 10 a.m., with a Show and Shine, Poker Walk, raffle drawing, music, dancing and kids’ games. Admission is free. Information: Jim Larson, 541-548-6329.

Desert Explorers Pass
The new Desert Explorers Pass, good for free admission (two adults, two kids) to the High Desert Museum, is now available at all Deschutes Public Library branches. A limited number of passes available each week to library cardholders 17 and older. Information: 541-617-7097 or visit www.dpls.lib.or.us. Click on “My Library Account” and “High Desert Museum Passes.”

Healing plants at museum
The Healing Power of Plants, a traveling exhibit developed by the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, is open through Sept. 21 at the High Desert Museum south of Bend. Guided “nature walks” weekdays at 9:30 a.m. Information: 541-382-4754 or visit www.highdesertmuseum.org.

Summer reading program

The summer library reading program for kids birth through fifth grade runs through Aug. 16 at all Deschutes Public Libraries. Free activities, prize drawings, entertainers, story times and more. Children earn a free book for every three hours of reading. Reading time earns “BugBucks” for toys and games at the Redmond Library’s Flea Market. Busy Bees weekly story times for ages five and under and Buzz Patrol, a weekly program of creative activities for ages six to 11 Tuesdays at 2 p.m. Information: 541-312-1054.

Women’s beginner mountain bike clinic

Cog Wild is offering a Women’s Beginner Mountain Bike Clinic now through Aug. 10. Women will learn how to use gears, ride off-road and explore local trail options.Information: 541-385-7002 or visit www.cogwild.com.

Summer In The Park

Each weekday now through Aug. 29, Redmond Area Park and Recreation District hosts “Summer In The Park” for kids 5 to 11 in Sam Johnson Park. From 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., kids enjoy supervised games, arts and crafts. Swimming is offered Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Cascade Swim Center. Cost is $20 per day, or $70 per week. Information: 541-548-7275.

Andy Warhol exhibit

Iconic Andy Warhol images and works by other artists are on exhibit now through Nov. 15 at the Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Dr., Goldendale, Wash. An opening celebration for the exhibit will be held Saturday, Aug. 2, with a collector’s talk, gallery walk, family art activities and monoprint workshop. Information: 509-773-3733 or visit www.maryhhillmuseum.org.

Deschutes County Fair & Rodeo 2008

The 2008 Deschutes County Fair runs July 30 through Aug. 3. Hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Discount days and special events:
Free admission everyday for veterans and current military personnel.

  • Pepsi Day July 30. Seven rides for $14 (coupons must be redeemed between noon and 6 p.m..
  • KOHD Day July 31. Free admission plus one carnival ride for 12 and under with a can of food.
  • Free admission for everyone Aug. 1 before 3 p.m.
  • Unlimited rides for $22 Aug. 3.
  • Rodeos (free with admission) July 30-31, 6:30 p.m.; Aug. 1, 7 p.m.; Aug. 2, 7:30 p.m.
  • Little Big Town performs July 30, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 99.7 FM.
  • Alice Cooper performs July 31, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 98.3 FM.
  • Kellie Pickler performs Aug. 1, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 99.7 FM.
Daily admission prices are $9 adults, $6 kids 6-12 and seniors, free for kids 5 and under.

AARP Driver Safety class offered

An AARP Driver Safety class will be offered at Redmond Senior Center Aug. 11-12, 8 a.m.-noon. The class focuses on defensive driving and compensating for age-related changes. Information: 548-6325.
Mt. Hood Adventure Park now open
The Mt. Hood Adventure Park at Skibowl is now open for the summer. The park offers an Alpine slide, downhill mountain biking, bungee jump, IndyKart racing, hiking trails, 500-foot zipline, scenic skychair rides, mini-golf, kids’ play zone and more.
Skibowl is open weekdays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and weekends 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Information: Visit www.skibowl.com or call (800) SKI BOWL.

“Menopause the Musical” at 2nd Street

The 2nd Street Theater in Bend presents “Menopause The Musical,” by Jeanie Linders July 24 through Aug. 30. Showtimes are Wednesdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 students and seniors age 62 and older. The comedy musical features 25 re-lyricized tunes from the ‘60s and ‘70s and culminates with a salute to women who are experiencing “The Change.” Information: 541-312-9626 or visit www.2ndstreettheater.com.

Stand-up comedy at Tower Theater

Comedians Kirk Fox and Joe Vesapaziani will perform at the Tower Theater in Bend July 30 at 8 p.m.; ages 21 and older only.

Booher Family Music Camp concert

The musically talented Booher Family is hosting a Family Music Camp concert Friday, Aug. 1, 7-9 p.m., at the Sisters Community Church, 15220 Highway 242, Sisters. Over 100 musicians and instructors, including the Booher Brothers, will perform fiddle, piano and guitar. Tickets are $12 adults, $5 children 6-12, and free for 5 and under. Proceeds help fund music scholarships. Information: 541-390-4390.

Spanish language conversation groups

The Redmond French Conversation Group meets Saturdays at 1:30 p.m. and the Spanish/English Language Exchange Group, “Compañros Friends,” meets at 9:30 a.m. on Saturdays. Both groups meet in Santiago’s Maté Company, 528 S.W. Sixth St.Free and open to everyone. Information: Barb Eager, 541-447-0732.

Susie Luchsinger to perform Aug. 3

Gospel and Christian country singer Susie Luchsinger with the Mud Springs Gospel Band perform Aug. 3 at the Antelope Community Church. The free concert begins at 4 p.m

Tuesday Market at Eagle Crest

Tuesday Market at Eagle Crest has returned for the summer. The open air market is open Tuesdays, 2-6 p.m., at the soccer field on Falcon Crest Drive at Eagle Crest through Aug. 26. Fresh produce and food products, nursery stock and local artisans. Information: Yoleen, 541-633-9637.
Oregon Equestrian Trails meetings
Oregon Equestrian Trails meets on the first Tuesday of the month at Ray’s Food Place, 900 S.W. 23rd St. at 6:30 p.m., with a speaker presentation beginning at 7 p.m. Nonmembers are welcome to attend. Contact: Marilyn Ball at 382-4492 or Jan Fuller at 548-6124.

Soroptimist of Redmond meeting
Soroptimist of Redmond has changed its meeting days and location to the first, second and third Thursday of each month, noon, at the Black Bear Diner, 429 N.W. Cedar Ave., in Redmond. Information: 541-504-7973.

Country Fair and Art Show
The Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Sisters holds the 13th annual old-fashioned county fair with face painting, a petting zoo, pony rides, a silent auction, food, a fine arts show and more; proceeds benefit multiple community agencies.The art show begins Aug. 8 from 5-8 p.m., fair begins Aug. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.






Pacific City: Whispers of the Past

photo by Leslie Pugmire Hole/Copyright Redmond Spokesman

People don’t just get into a rut in their daily lives, often they fall into the same old patterns while on vacation.

Personally, my time at the Oregon coast has always had a serious northern slant, with very infrequent visits to the central or southern section of the shore. Marrying into a Pacific City-loving family, however, has made me a convert to the benefits of life beyond Tillamook Bay.

Pacific City seems to be a rather unique creature in coastal towns. Like many other longtime resort towns such as Seaside, Lincoln City and Florence, PC (as the locals call it) was a natural resources supported rural community that has transitioned slowly into a more tourism-based economy. But while the former have grown dramatically over the years, PC has shown more modest changes.

“When I was a kid we’d leave on our bikes in the morning with instructions to check in every four hours. We’d be gone all day, playing at the beach, the river, in the dunes. That’s all we needed and that’s all kids still need.”

For the inside scoop on life in PC I went straight to the source – my mother-in-law Jann Burelbach. Who better to hear the history and get tips on things to see and do in town than someone whose family has been coming to PC every summer since 1925?

That was the year Jann’s grandfather, a dentist from Dallas, Ore., built a ‘fishing shack’ for his family vacations, just like countless other refugees from the valley who came to call PC their second home. The cabin still stands and is used by the third generation of Burelbachs, a common occurrence in PC.

“There are people in town that I played with as a kid and now they have homes here,” says Jann. “We’re still unincorporated and most of the locals I know like it that way. We have a library, a fire station, a dentist and a doctor – the only thing we don’t have is mayor or city hall and who needs that?”

Pacific City has a handful of upscale inns and an expansive RV park, a scattering of fancy gift stores and art galleries, but mostly it's still about the hardware store, the bait and fishing tackle shop and the local burger shack. It's a town you can live in with nothing but two wheels for transportation because everything is within biking distance; traffic only requires a single stop light and that one only blinks. For every beachfront luxury home there must be three ramshackle cabins or doublewides, occupied by a mix of year-round residents and vacation home owners of more modest means.

We've come to love the eclectic mix of new and old, fancy and well-loved. Even the local thrift store, very clean and organized and occupying an attractive newer building, declares it does not sell used items but things that have “proven themselves.”

“I can remember riding my horse across the wooden bridge (spanning the Big Nestucca River) and he would freak out because of the load noise his hooves made,” says Jann. “We're on like the third or fourth bridge now – they've had to replace it several times since my grandfather used to cross it in the early days and drive his car with huge balloon tires to the Cape because there was no road.”

Some may argue but it's my belief that Pacific City must be the most photogenic spot on the Oregon coast. You have Cape Kiwanda's stark sandstone bluffs and wind-sculpted pines, its enormous dune face always populated with crowds of running children; Haystack Rock with its funny pitcher-handle arch, the stark stretch of dune and beach grass along Bob Straub State Park and the awesome Nestucca Bay.

Even if you can't click a shutter without cutting off someone's head, there's plenty of eye candy in Pacific City: dory fishermen charging through the surf from the beach, harbor seals sunning on sand spits, hangliders defying gravity by launching from the top of the cape and Technicolor tidepools revealed twice each day.

What has my new-found discovery of PC prompted me to recommend?

The dune. Suck it up and climb the mammoth slope, you'll be glad you did. The views are stupendous and the run down makes you feel 10 years old again. During our last visit my husband was racing one of the kids to the bottom, running at the full tilt when he ended his trip with a 20 mph face plant. Even so, he came up smiling.

Cape Kiwanda Marketplace. This is the spot where you'll find fresh-off-the boat seafood, if the season is right and catches are good.

Straub State Park. A four-mile long spit of sparsely visited trails between ocean and river, shared by diverse wildlife and flora.

Three Capes Scenic Drive. A can't-be-missed trip of 40 miles of rainforest, lighthouses, headlands, and beaches.

Jann has many, many favorite spots in and around Pacific City but the one she treasures the most, and the one she chooses to visit every year for her birthday, is the mouth of Nestucca Bay.

“It's the most beautiful place on any shore I've ever seen. It's spectacular – a must-see.”

Jann's Picks

Sportmen's Pub N' Grub (34975 Brooten Rd.)

“Great food and reasonable prices. Best fish and chips I've ever had.”

Riverhouse Restaurant (34450 Brooten Rd.)

“Right on the Nestucca and wonderful food.”

Greatful Bread (34805 Brooten Rd.)

“Best breakfasts and lunches in town. My favorite.”

PC Riverside Market (34595 Brooten Rd.)

“Great little market. They seem to have everything.”

Village Merchants (34950 Brooten Rd.)

“I go in there every time we have guests; I never get tired of it”

Dapper Frog Worldwide Art and Gifts (34930 Brooten Rd.)

“It's hard to describe and impossible to resist.”

Inn at Pacific City (http://www.innatpacificcity.com/)

“They're close to everything and cute and reasonable.”

Anchorage Motel (http://www.oregoncoast.com/anchorage/)

“I think of it as whispers of the past, an old-fashioned beach motor court motel.”

-- story by Leslie Pugmire Hole/copyright Redmond Spokesman

July 22, 2008

July 23, 2008 updates

"Crosswords of Thought" by Jerry Werner

  • The city of Redmond is hoping its citizen advisory committee, Redmond Commission on Art in Public Places, can muster enough community support for public art to fund a landscape sculpture for the large median between the new highway reroute and Highland and Glacier avenues. Donations for a previous hoped-for acquisition, "Dignity " by Rodd Ambroson, has been slow in coming, a sign that perhaps fundraising for niceties like art might be a hard sell in the community these days. Nevertheless, the city has received proposals from four arts and scale models are on display at Redmond Public Library through July for public comments. So far the city has given RCAPP $25,000 towards purchase of public art, with a promise of more in matching funds. The $5,000 raised so far for "Dignity" is still $10,000 short of that match goal, however.
  • Humane Society of Redmond is open, for now, and has hired an interim executive director in an effort to get back on track. Diane Gokey's years of experience in the business and nonprofit sector are hoped to revitalized the troubled organization, which has been operating in the red for some time.
  • Two longtime downtown businesses announced closings this week. Kayo's Roadhouse locked its door abruptly July 21, after nearly 10 years of operation in Redmond. Tum-a-Lum Lumber, Redmond's oldest continuously operating business (1910), announced it would be shutting down within weeks due to declining sales and increased competition.

Hurry up and wade

Hurry up and Wade

Every once in a while, this page is used to highlight a recreational outing, a little Sunday-afternoon jaunt that’s fun for the whole family

This is not one of those stories. It started out as one, yes, but after a trip that we calculated to take four or five hours stretched into nine with no end in sight, it had become something else, kind of a cautionary tale about getting in over your head.

Previously, my boat has mostly been used for calm stretches of the Deschutes in and around Bend – perfectly nice paddling that is only partially marred by the enormous number of people using this particular piece of river.

In order to do a Redmond-specific piece about paddling, it would have to be something a little closer. Sports editor Gary Newman was quick to volunteer to go along, and in no time, we'd settled on a route from Tumalo State Park to Cline Falls State Park, roughly 14 miles by water.

Within 15 minutes, we were falling out of our boats for the first time.

The Tumalo to Twin Bridges stretch of the river is the only one I can responsibly recommend to anyone. The bird and wildflower life is considerable, and the river consists mostly of shallow but brisk moving waters. In a few places it's easier to walk the boat, but there are also a handful of playful standing waves and other low-level rapids accessible to paddlers of all abilities.

Twin Bridges is the last takeout point before Cline Falls, and the canyon walls started to climb and narrow. We continue and after a few miles and a half-dozen spills, the canyon bottom widens and flattens out, and we can hear the rumble of Awbrey Falls in the distance.

In our limited research, the falls stood out as the most dangerous obstacle along our route. Five years ago, a college student from Redmond inner tubing on the river was killed at the falls, and guidebooks advise all paddlers to portage around the falls, regardless of skill level.

About a hundred yards above the falls, I go under. Throwing my pack and my paddle to shore, I lock on to the tail of the boat, dragging it as it fills with water, my feet sliding across the slimy rocks on the river bottom. Losing my footing, one hand slips from the boat and I’m dragged, face down in the water, for another 15 or 20 feet before I can regain my grip on the boat and wrestle it to shore. Panting and spitting up water, I can see Gary 50 yards upstream, getting out of his boat in an orderly fashion just above the rapids.

The growth is terrifically thick here, and we’re climbing on it as much as through it, finding footing on dead branches and vines as often as solid ground. Gary begins to squirm and yelp.
“Nettles,” he says, and then I feel them too, burning like a belt sander on my shins.

After 30 minutes of fighting through the riverside growth, we reach a dry area midway up the canyon wall. The hillside is scattered with animal bones of every kind imaginable.

“Wow, lotta things seem to die out here,” I say.
Gary nods. We both look up at the canyon walls around us – no roads, no trails, no easy way out should somebody get hurt.

“I wonder if we even get cell reception out here,” says Gary, digging through his pack. He pulls out a little baggie that looks like it ought to be used for transporting guppies, but instead of fish, that’s his phone floating belly-side up in the water. It’s dead.

Below the falls is an area described in my map as the “White Mile,” a Class III rapid. For the next two hours or so, we jump from rock to rock where we can, leading the boats on our ropes. At other times, we wade, and occasionally, we bob downstream, bashing our knees and tailbones against hidden rocks. Once in a great while we get in our boats, moving downstream 50 or 100 yards at a stretch before either tipping over or pulling over to the bank.

With luck, the end of the White Mile follows shortly after Gary's announcement of a broken paddle. Finding ourselves in the nicest open water we’ve seen so far, we float along lazily, picking at our sopping-wet lunches. Gary decides he wants to try to fix his paddle, but ends up instead with a knot of duct tape and wooden splints as big around as his leg. But the water’s nice, and we assume we’re past the worst, so half a paddle will do just fine.

A big rock with its top scooped out like a soapdish grabs my boat by the nose, the current snagging the back end and spinning it around to the left to settle on another rock. The boat has filled with water, but I'm securely lodged, and can begin the orderly process of setting my backpack and paddle on the second rock. With tremendous difficulty, I manage to dislodge my boat and the 200 or so pounds of water inside it. It shoots off, and I'm sprinting after it on shore like a wet drunk fleeing the cops.

At the bottom of one of yet another rapid, I pull into a calm backwater to wait for Gary. After ten minutes, something comes floating out of the rapids towards me. It’s Gary’s backpack. Diving in, I grab it and swim it over to shore. It’s full of a milky slurry of saltines, cheese, and river water.

Gary turns up shortly thereafter, relieved that I’ve recovered his pack. I'm relieved to see him. II tell him how the little thunderbird ring I wear had slipped off while I was retrieving his pack, and he looks down to find his wedding band missing.

That was enough paddling for Gary.

By now, we'd been on the river for upwards of nine hours. The sun had slipped behind the canyon rim, and nearly all of the river was in shadow.

"I have a proposal," I say.

And so we pulled the boats ashore and began hiking straight up the canyon wall. No one would steal our boats, because no one sane would be coming down here.

The woman who lived on top of the canyon was uncommonly receptive to two filthy, wet strangers who had come staggering out of the desert covered in bruises and scratches. Gary borrowed the phone to call his wife for a ride, and we were given cups of ice water.

That's when the plane appeared. A little green and white single-engine, it was flying unusually low, and had just made a loop above the bottom of the canyon.

At the 7-11 near my home, I called my mother on a pay phone. She said she had to go.

"I've got my sister on the other line, and I should probably call your father. He chartered a plane to go look for you."

Wow.

Gary had nightmares that night, bony hands reaching out of the river to pull him under. Regardless, the next day he wanted to go pick up the boats.

There were three men fishing near our boats when we reached the bottom of the canyon.

"You're going to carry those things all the way up there?" the leader of the group said. "Good luck with that."

-- photo and story by Scott Hammers
Copyright Redmond Spokesman


Redmond-area event calendar

Harvest Run car show

The 15th Annual Drifters Car Club Harvest Run is set for Aug. 15-16 in downtown Redmond. There will be close to 200 classic and custom cars, hot rods, motorcycles and trucks on display. The event kicks off Aug. 15, 6 p.m., with a barbecue and music. Cruising downtown starts at 8 p.m. Activities continue Aug. 16, 10 a.m., with a Show and Shine, Poker Walk, raffle drawing, music, dancing and kids’ games. Admission is free. Information: Jim Larson, 541-548-6329.

Dog Days of Summer

Columbia River Bank presents Dog Days of Summer, a festival of live bluegrass, country, rock ‘n’ roll and blues music Aug. 16, from 12 p.m. - 9 p.m. The event in Sam Johnson Park will feature a kids’ area with inflatable rides, food and retail vendors and more.Information: 541-389-1995.

Country western dance

Members and guests are welcome to attend a country western dance at Redmond’s VFW Hall, 1836 SW Veterans Way, Aug. 2, 7-11 p.m.

Go Wild! at library

Slightly Illusional, a kids’ performer, will lead an imaginary tour of backyards and parks through magic, puppetry and storytelling at Redmond Public Library, 827 SW Deschutes Ave., Aug. 6 at 1 p.m. The event is for children ages 6-11.

Camp Good News

Ponderosa Chapter of the Child Evangelism will be holding two sessions of summer camp Aug. 16-19, Aug. 19-22, at Camp Good News west of Sisters. Financial aid and limited transportation are available. Register at 541-365-2233.

Music on the Green

Tony Graham, internationally renowned singer/songwriter, will perform Wednesday, July 23, 6-7:30 p.m., during the Redmond Chamber of Commerce Music on the Green concert in Sam Johnson Park. Concerts are free. Food vendors on site. Information: 541-923-5191.

Redmond Revival Street Festival

Redmond Revival Street Festival kicks off Aug. 16, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., with mimosas and crepes; other activities include face painting, pony rides, live music by the Gospel Choir of the Cascades, Andy Armer’s Jazz Trio and Bellavia, a pedestrian parade, a fun run and more. Information: 541-923-3977.

Open mic night

The Redmond Public Library is hosting several activities for teens in August:
Monday, Aug. 4, 3-4:30 p.m., Dec Out My Deck. Teens can bring skateboards, bikes, and rollerblades to the library and decorate it with stencils and stickers.
Wednesday, Aug. 6, 3-4:30 p.m., Slightly Illusional. Tales of revenge beyond the grave, hauntings in Oregon and Washington, and demonstrations of strange artifacts.
Thursday, Aug. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Game Day. Teens can play Guitar Hero, Dance Dance Revolution, and Nintento Wii.
Friday, Aug. 29, 5:30-7 p.m., Open Mic Night. Teens can sing, dance, recite poetry or perform other talents. Must register by July 31.
All events are free. Information: 541-312-1063.

Driving Miss Daisy

Innovation Theatre Works, Central Oregon’s new, professional theatre company, will present, “Driving Miss Daisy,” Sept. 20 through Oct. 5 at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Tickets are $25-$45 and can be purchased online at www.towertheatre.org, or by phone, 541-317-0700.

Women’s beginner mountain bike clinic

Cog Wild is offering a Women’s Beginner Mountain Bike Clinic through Aug. 10. Women will learn how to use gears, ride off-road and explore local trail options.
Information: 541-385-7002 or visit www.cogwild.com.

Andy Warhol exhibit

Iconic Andy Warhol images and works by other artists are on exhibit now through Nov. 15 at the Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Dr., Goldendale, Wash. An opening celebration for the exhibit will be held Saturday, Aug. 2, with a collector’s talk, gallery walk, family art activities and monoprint workshop. Information: 509-773-3733 or visit www.maryhhillmuseum.org.

Library research tips

Local librarian Kathy Duffy will present, “How to Research Using Your Library,” during the Central Oregon Writers Guild meeting July 24, 6:30 p.m., at the Redmond Public Library. Free and open to all. Information: 541-388-0836 or e-mail wordcrafter1@msn.com.

When I’m In Charge

Redmond Area Park and Recreation District (RAPRD) will host “When I’m In Charge,” a class for kids 9-11 Friday, July 25, at the RAPRD Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St. Teaches safety, awareness and responsibility when staying home alone. Cost is $20. Information: 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org.

RAPRD horseback riding lessons

Redmond Area Park and Recreation District (RAPRD) is offering horseback riding lessons for kids ages 7-16 at Diane’s Riding Place in Tumalo Saturdays, July 26 through Aug. 16. Cost is $100. Information: 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org.

Dance workshop

Redmond School of Dance is offering hip hop, African, and tap dance workshops July 28- Aug. 2, culminating in a performance at the Deschutes County Fair. Ages 12 and above for the hip hop and African classes. Master dance teachers for Western Oregon University will teach the African and hip hop classes and the Hot Shot Tap Dancers will teach the tap. Informmation: 541-548-6957.


Deschutes County Fair & Rodeo 2008

The 2008 Deschutes County Fair runs July 30 through Aug. 3. Hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Discount days and special events:
Free admission everyday for veterans and current military personnel.
Pepsi Day July 30. Seven rides for $14 (coupons must be redeemed between noon and 6 p.m.
KOHD Day July 31. Free admission plus one carnival ride for 12 and under with a can of food.
Free admission for everyone Aug. 1 before 3 p.m.
Unlimited rides for $22 Aug. 3.
Rodeos (free with admission) July 30-31, 6:30 p.m.; Aug. 1, 7 p.m.; Aug. 2, 7:30 p.m.
Little Big Town performs July 30, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 99.7 FM.
Alice Cooper performs July 31, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 98.3 FM.
Kellie Pickler performs Aug. 1, 7 p.m. Free tickets by listening to 99.7 FM.
Daily admission prices are $9 adults, $6 kids 6-12 and seniors, free for kids 5 and under.

Booher Family Music Camp performance

The musically talented Booher Family is hosting a Family Music Camp concert Friday, Aug. 1, 7-9 p.m., at the Sisters Community Church, 15220 Highway 242, Sisters. Over 100 musicians and instructors, including the Booher Brothers, will perform fiddle, piano and guitar. Tickets are $12 adults, $5 children 6-12, and free for 5 and under. Proceeds help fund music scholarships. Information: 541-390-4390.

Susie Luchsinger

Gospel and Christian country singer Susie Luchsinger with the Mud Springs Gospel Band perform Aug. 3 at the Antelope Community Church. The free concert begins at 4 p.m.

Soroptimist of Redmond meeting

Soroptimist of Redmond has changed its meeting days and location to the first, second and third Thursday of each month, noon, at the Black Bear Diner, 429 N.W. Cedar Ave., in Redmond. Information: 541-504-7973.

Country Fair and Art Show in Sisters

The Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Sisters holds the 13th annual old-fashioned county fair with face painting, a petting zoo, pony rides, a silent auction, food, a fine arts show and more; proceeds benefit multiple community agencies.The art show begins Aug. 8 from 5-8 p.m., fair begins Aug. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Fiesta Del Sol

Fiesta del Sol, a celebration of Latino culture, will be held Saturday, Aug. 16, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., in Troy field, downtown Bend. The community festival features live Latin music, dancing, food, a kids’ plaza, decorations and vendors. Proceeds benefit the Latino Community Association Programs. Information: 541-383-8268.

Dancing stallions

The World Famous Lipizzaner Stallions presents their 38th anniversary performance of Dancing White Stallions Aug. 23-24 at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Tickets are $22.50 adults, and $20.50 for children and seniors. Tickets go on sale July 24 at Big R in Redmond, Spotted Mule Saddlery in Bend and online at www.tickets.com. Information: 541-548-2711 or visit www.lipizzaner.com.