February 24, 2009

Event Calendar

WEDNESDAY
Feb. 25
KIDS MOVE WITH MUSIC DEMONSTRATION: Janellybean leads a KinderMusik movement and music program for children ages newborn to 5 years; free; 9:15 a.m.; Outside-In PlayCafe, 845 S.W. 17th St., Suite 201, Redmond; 541-325-6995 or www.kidsmovewithmusic.com.
SCHOOL BOARD: Redmond School Board meeting 5:30 p.m.; agenda includes discussion of the closing of Brown High School and alternative education; 145 S.E. Salmon Ave.; full agenda at www.redmond.k12.or.us.

THURSDAY
Feb. 26
CREATIONS WITH SHRINKY DINKS: Choose or create your own design, trace it, cut it, and bake it. All materials provided. Ages 12-17. Register online at www.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
“SPAY-GHETTI FEED”: The Humane Society of Redmond’s spay and neuter program is hosting a buffet dinner of spaghetti, salad and more; proceeds benefit the society; $12.95 adults, $8.95 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.
CENTRAL OREGON WRITERS GUILD MEETS: Local author Paty Jager will speak about “Promotion 101 - The Nuts and Bolts of Promoting You and Your Writing.”; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; Elsie Rochna,541-923-0896.
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council goal setting meeting, 3-7 p.m.; open to the public; 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

FRIDAY
Feb. 27
AUTHOR STEVE LENT: Event includes a presentation on “Central Oregon Place Names: Volume II: Jefferson County,” which explains how many places in Jefferson County got their name; refreshments provided; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.
OREGON SPORTS AND FITNESS EXPO: Event features hundreds of exhibitors and events offering the latest in fitness, diet, nutrition, strength and apparel products and services; the Renegade Rollergirls will perform a 30-minute scrimmage; free; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-2009.

SATURDAY
Feb. 28
MODELING AND ETIQUETTE: Learn the tools of modeling, beginning with business skills then onto runway instruction, makeup application and hair styling. Ages 10 and up; $80; Class starts Feb. 28 and continues March 1; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
OREGON SPORTS AND FITNESS EXPO: Event features hundreds of exhibitors and events offering the latest in fitness, diet, nutrition, strength and apparel products and services; the day ends with a Desert Brawl featuring 10 full-contact cage fights; free admission, $12 in advance for the Desert Brawl event; 7 a.m. vendors open, 8-10 p.m. Desert Brawl; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-389-2009.
REDMOND GRANGE PANCAKE BREAKFAST: A breakfast of sourdough pancakes, sausage, eggs and more; proceeds benefit Friends of Canines; $5 adults, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-923-1840.
MAKE YOUR OWN ROOT BEER: Learn how to make, bottle and cap a six pack of root beer to take home. All materials provided. Ages 7-12; $16; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond High School Hartman Campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-923-4840.
DIXIELAND CONCERT: The Cascade Brass Quintet performs; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1032.
“MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions and Canyons Fine Dining presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater performance; dinner includes salad, choice of entree and dessert; $55 includes dinner and show; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Canyons Fine Dining, 1857 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-7999 or www.buckboardproductions.com.
AN EVENING WITH ELVIS AND JOHN DENVER: Jamie’s Rock & Roll Legends presents Elvis impersonator Justin Shandor and John Denver impersonator Ted Vigil in an authentic Las Vegas act full of hits from the 1950s and 70s; $20, $25 front area; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-6990.
COCC CHOIR & JAZZ ENSEMBLE CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Choir and the Central Singers perform a vocal concert; $5; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7575.
AUDITIONS FOR ANNIE: Redmond High School Theatre Department is holding auditions for its production of Annie in May. Middle and elementary school kids will be cast for the parts of orphans and the lead of Annie from 9:30-2:30 p.m. Dogs are invited to audition for the role of Sandy from 2:30-4 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; Phil Neely,541-923-4800, ext. 2065.

MONDAY
March 2
PLANNING COMMISSION: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission meeting, 7 p.m.; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.: agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

TUESDAY
March 3
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meeting, 6:45 a.m.; open to the public; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

THURSDAY
March 5
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminars, camp cooking demonstrations, archery and fly casting competitions, boats and RVs; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.otshows.com.
PARENTING YOUNG CHILDREN: Sarah E. Nelson, LCSW and Nancy Hoffman, LCSW, presents, “Parenting Young Children with the 123 Magic curriculum.” Childcare provided; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Cascade Medical Clinic, 211 N.W. Larch Ave., Redmond; 541-548-2164.
THE SASQUATCH SLEUTH: Larry Lund, who has taught classes on Bigfoot related subjects at Portland Community College, gives a talk and presentation on the subject; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1032 or lizg@dpls.us.

FRIDAY
March 6
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminars, camp cooking demonstrations, archery and fly casting competitions, boats and RVs; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.otshows.com.

SATURDAY
March 7
BENTO BOX FUN: Kids learn how to make a Japanese style “bento” box meal with ingredients they choose. Ages 6-12; $15; 10-11:30 a.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminars, camp cooking demonstrations, archery and fly casting competitions, boats and RVs; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.otshows.com.
HIGH DESERT PERSPECTIVE ON WOLVES: Brian Connolly, author of “Wolf Journal,” “Wolves: A Legend Returns” and “Hawk” will read excerpts and give a presentation on how he helps field biologists spot wolves and wolf behavior in Yellowstone National Park; a book signing will follow; included with the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
COSMIC SWIM NIGHT: Games, music and cool cosmic lights for middle-school students (must show ID); $2.50; 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

SUNDAY
March 8
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminars, camp cooking demonstrations, archery and fly casting competitions, boats and RVs; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.otshows.com.
CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: Band standards, show tunes, orchestra transcriptions, marches and more performed under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-593-1635 or www.cascadewinds.org.
BATTLEFIELD BAND: A traditional Scottish music performance; $20-$25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

MONDAY
March 9
DUKE ELLINGTON ORCHESTRA: A jazz performance led by Paul Mercer Ellington, son of Duke Ellington; $30 and $40; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY
March 11
COOKING WITH MOMMY: Decorate cookies, make fun shape sandwiches and goofy drinks. Ages 2-5; $20; 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.

THURSDAY
March 12
COMEDY WITH GALLAGHER: Comedy without the mess. Gallagher’s “no sledge” show incorporates intelligent social and political commentary; $24 to $29; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700.

FRIDAY
March 13
STAR GAZING WITH OMSI: Step into the Discover Dome and learn the names of stars and constellations. Early session for kids K-6. Evening sessions for kids and adults; $18; A later evening session for adults and kids follows at 6 pm to 7 pm; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
A FINE AND PLEASANT MISERY: Tim Behrens brings to the stage humor writer Patrick F. McManus’ first book, A Fine and Pleasant Misery. A portion of proceeds will benefit Deschutes County SMART; $24.50 to $29.50; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700.

SATURDAY
March 14
SENSE-SATIONAL SATURDAY, MIGRATION SENSE-SATION: Family activities centered on the return of migrating birds to the High Desert; learn about migratory journeys with hands-on projects, games, crafts and more; designed for kindergarten through sixth-grade; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
EXPLORE BASIC COPYRIGHT LAWS: Sagebrushers Art Society presents, “What Artists Should Know About Copyrights.”; free; 12:30-2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-1567.
GREAT CHORALE WORKS CONCERTS: The Cascade Chorale will perform four Te Deums, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7401 or www.cascadechorale.org.

SUNDAY
March 15
AUTHOR MOLLY GLOSS: Portland-based award-winning author presents her book “Hearts of Horses”; part of the “Celebrate Oregon Authors” series; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
GREAT CHORALE WORKS CONCERTS: The Cascade Chorale will perform four Te Deums, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 3 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7401 or www.cascadechorale.org.
music and cool cosmic lights for middle-school students (must show ID); $2.50; 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-5

Good Stuff sale
A fundraising sale for the Humane Society of Redmond is planned for March 13-14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., at the shelter, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Anyone interested in donating items for the sale can drop off items Saturdays Feb. 28 and March 7, 1-5 p.m., and Mondays, March 2 and 9, 1-5 p.m., and Thursday, March 12. No clothing items please. Information: 541-923-0882.

Baby supplies donations needed
The Redmond Soroptimists will host the Fourth Annual Community Mother and Baby Shower Saturday, March 7, 1-3 p.m., in the Community Room in Ray’s Food Place, Redmond. People are encouraged to bring donations of new and gently used baby items such as disposable diapers, wipes, pacifiers, blankets, socks, hats, booties, bottles, onesies, pajamas, toys, and toiletries such as baby power, oil, shampoo and lotion. All items will be given to mothers and babies who are victims of poverty, violence or abuse.
Cash donations are also accepted. Donations can also be dropped off at Redmond branches of LibertyBank, Community First Bank and South Valley Bank.
Redmond Soroptimists will be accepting donations for the entire month of March. Information: Paula, 541-306-7062.

Living On A Few Acres conference
The OSU Extension Service will host a conference on Living on a Few Acres Saturday, March 14, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, North Sisters Building. The conference was developed by the OSU Extension Service to provide educational workshops that focus on the needs of those living on small farms and acreages. Cost is $35 per person or $60 for two if registered by March 9, and $50 per person if registered after March 10. Information: 541-548-6088, ext. 7957, or e-mail: dana.martin@oregonstate.edu. Class descriptions and registration forms are available online at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/deschutes.

Pic of the week

Posted by Picasa
photo by Andy Tullis
The Redmond High School nordic ski teams (and coaches) celebrate a second-place finish in in the Oregon High School Nordic championships Feb. 22 at Mt. Bachelor.

Obituaries

Jean Ryan Workman
July 25, 1927 - Feb. 16, 2009
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 548-3219
Services: No services will be held at her request. Memorial Contributions can be made to Redmond-Sisters Hospice in her name.

Donald W. Currier
July 24, 1932 - Feb. 14, 2009
Donald W. Currier, 76, of Sisters died February 14, 2009. There will be no services at Don’s request.
Donald was born in LaGrande, Oregon to Walt and Ruby (Hilyard) Currier. After graduating high school in his younger years, he was a rodeo cowboy; he graced the Sisters Rodeo poster in 1959.
He was a log truck driver for Barclay Logging here in Central Oregon as well as a chip truck driver for Bar Seven A Trucking.
He was an outdoorsman enjoying fishing, hunting, and just loved being in the woods.
Donald was preceded in death by his wife, Christine of 47 years.
He is survived by one son, Ron (Lorna) Currier of Keizer, OR; a daughter, Dawn Spencer of Bend; Three grandchildren and one great- grandchild.
Redmond Memorial Chapel has been entrusted with the final arrangements.

John Thomas Geenen
June 28, 1953 - Feb.22, 2009
John Thomas Geenen, 55, of Boardman, OR passed away Sunday, February 22, 2009.
He was born June 28, 1953 in Detroit, Michigan to John and Doraldean Geenen.
At the time of his death, he worked as a driver for 3 Js Trucking. Prior to that he worked in the circulation department for The Hermiston Herald and The Bend Bulletin.
Survived by wife, LeeAnne; mother, Doraldean; his children - daughters, Heather Montino, Theresa Torres; and son, Christopher Geenen; brother, David and his wife, Mary Geenen; as well as several grandchildren, and nieces and nephews.
He was preceded in death by his father, John.
Memorial Services will be held at a later date.

Gordon “Fred” Hall
September 25, 1907 - February 13, 2009
Fred passed away peacefully at his home in Redmond. He
was 101.
Fred was born in Savanna, Washington to Fred and Gladys Hall, spending his early childhood around the Ellensburg and Leavenworth, Washington area. In 1959, he and Faye moved to Redmond from Rouge Valley to start a new business.
Fred loved to travel - always eager to embark on any venture. In 1992, Fred sold his ranch and moved to 32nd after having a successful career as a cattle broker. Fred was still riding his horse well into his 90’s, attending Downtown Athletic Club as a member when he was 97 and traveling.
Fred was a devoted husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He was respected by all. Over the years, Fred took his children and many of his grandchildren to Washington to visit his roots. He was often asked his secret to such a long & healthy life. His response was always “I
wouldn’t change one thing. I loved what I did”.
Services will be held at Highland Baptist Church on Saturday, March 7th, 1:30 p.m. The family respectfully requests that donations be made to Hospice of Redmond/Sisters.

February 18, 2009

Pic of the Week


photo by Gary G. Newman/Spokesman
Redmond High School's Bend Baca (top) works for back points in the first round against Levi Roan of Crook County High School during the non-league meet Feb. 11. Baca won the match 7-5. Posted by Picasa

Poetry Out Loud

Monica Brown, winner of Redmond's Poetry Out Loud 2009
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When Redmond High School teacher Jeremy Rubenstein arrived at the school Feb. 11 and saw a full parking lot, he was ecstatic to think how many people in the community were showing their enthusiasm about poetry by attending the school’s Poetry Out Loud scholarship competition.

Then he found out there was a wrestling tournament in the gym.

Even after realizing only a few dozen people were in the auditorium for the poetry, his excitement was not diminished.

“You guys have more courage than I could ever imagine having at your age,” Rubenstein told the 22 competitors. He got a big laugh when he added that he briefly wondered if it might be fun to have kids in wrestling singlets come up to the microphone and recite poetry but thought better of it.

Poetry Out Loud was begun in 2005 by the National Endowment of the Arts and the Poetry Foundation to encourage the study and understanding of great poetry. The organizations offer schools educational materials to begin the process at the classroom level, learning how dynamic recitation makes poetry more enjoyable.

Students recite poems from a long list of choices, including classics such as Poe’s “Annabel Lee” to more modern pieces like “Supermarket in California” by Alan Ginsberg. Classroom winners compete at the school level, and school winners go to a state competition. The national contest is in Washington D.C. in April.

Last year’s Oregon champion finished second at nationals, where the winner takes home a $20,000 scholarship.

Students are judged on several criteria, from physical presence (eye contact, body language), articulation and projection, appropriateness of dramatization and evidence of understanding and level of difficulty. Accuracy is also important. Points are deducted if students need to rely on a prompter to recall the words.

According to teacher Rachel Sarrett, organizer of the local competition, good poetry recitation is more about storytelling than acting.

“You’re not portraying a character; you’re conveying the meaning of your poem to the audience.”

The winner of this year’s competition, junior Monica Brown, knows about meaning.

“I could understand where she was coming from, even if it was more than 200 years ago,” she said. Her chosen poem, “On Virtue” by Phillis Wheatley, was written by a freed slave in the late 1700s and is laden with archaic language foreign to most teenagers today.

“I looked up a lot of the words to make sure I was using them correctly and closed my bedroom door so I could practice over and over.”

Brown, who says she’s lucky to be able to memorize easily, took her time choosing a poem for the competition, wanting to find one that she connected to.

“I’ve always really liked poetry,” she said. “When I was in middle school I’d use writing poetry as a creative outlet but I didn’t read it a lot. Now I love it.”

In the RHS auditorium, three judges listened to and watched each student while another tracked the accuracy of the recitation. After every presentation the judges – reminiscent of a beauty pageant where contestants are given scores for poise, appearance, and skill in interviews – added or took away points for each of the criteria required.

Points were tallied, so a student who had points taken off for accuracy but scored high in articulation and level of difficulty might receive a higher score than another who recited perfectly but failed to project or show understanding of the work.

Brown worked hard on all elements of the recitation.

“When I practiced for my parents I’d go through the process of explaining every line for them and that helped me make sure I was understanding it,” she said, adding that having a live audience helped her keep from over-dramatizing the recitation.

A Global Academy student at RHS, Brown credits teacher Jeremy Rubenstein for his support and inspiration in preparing for the contest. Now she is busy readying for the state competition in March, for which she needs to prepare three poems of varied length and complexity.

“I think poetry is something most teenagers can relate to,” she said. “It may be uncool to admit it but I think most of us use it as a way to understand all the things we go through.”

-- story and photo by Leslie Pugmire Hole

Event calendar

Feb. 19
GAME DAY FOR TEENS: Play Wii, Guitar Hero, Rock Band, and more. Ages 12-17. Register online at www.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
BIONEERS FILMS: Film series features two films that address social and environmental decisions that affect the world; donations accepted; 6:15 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.
BEHIND THE OREGON FLORA PROJECT : Linda Hardison will speak about the Oregon Flora Project, a comprehensive database of Oregon plants, and discuss how to use the information when gathering plants; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; Eileen, 541-923-2777 or www.oregonflora.org.

Feb. 20
KIDS NIGHT OUT: For kids K-5. Basketball, batting cage, contests, arts and crafts, movies, pizza; $15; 6-9 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
AUTHOR TOM DEWOLF: Presentation by Bend author Tom DeWolf on his book, “Inheriting the Trade: A Northern Family Confronts Its Legacy as the Largest Slave-Trading Dynasty in U.S. History.”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

Feb. 21
4-H DOG SHOW: Dogs R Us Fun Match for all ages. Show and classes for all levels of experience. Showmanship, obedience and rally obedience for dogs and their handlers. All dogs must be current on vaccines. Admission is free for spectators. Registration opens at 8:15 a.m; $5 per class; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-280-3856.
FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; event made possible by Mid Oregon Credit Union; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
HANDCRAFTED DENIM BAGS: Learn how to turn a pair of old jeans into handbags. Personalize with decorative stitches, iron on appliques and jewels. Ages 10 and up; $20; 9 a.m.-noon; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.
DUCT TAPE CREATIONS: Learn how to turn duct tape into unique yet functional items. Ages 9 and up; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.
CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Menu includes Dungeness crab, bread, salad, beer and wine. 21 and over only. Tickets are available at CL Printing and St. Thomas Academy of Redmond. Proceeds benefit the student technology program of St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $20 per person; 4-8 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Hall, 12th Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-548-3785.
COSMIC SWIM NIGHT: Games, music and cool cosmic lights for middle-school students (must show ID); $2.50; 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

Feb. 23
EFFECTIVE DISCIPLINE TECHNIQUES: Interactive class for parents, childcare providers and early childhood educators on proper discipline techniques; $18; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.

Feb. 24
KEYBOARDING CLASS: Class for beginners or those wanting to improve. Features an introduction to Ultra Key typing software. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes prior to class; free; 9-11 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org.
HARLEM GLOBETROTTER’S “SPINNING THE GLOBE” WORLD TOUR: Basketball show includes ball-handling tricks, slam dunks and family comedy; $16-$60; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-790-2787.

Feb. 26
CREATIONS WITH SHRINKY DINKS: Choose or create your own design, trace it, cut it, and bake it. All materials provided. Ages 12-17. Register online at sww.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
“SPAY-GHETTI FEED”: The Humane Society of Redmond’s spay and neuter program is hosting a buffet dinner of spaghetti, salad and more; proceeds benefit the society; $12.95 adults, $8.95 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.
CENTRAL OREGON WRITERS GUILD MEETS: Local author Paty Jager will speak about “Promotion 101 - The Nuts and Bolts of Promoting You and Your Writing.”; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; Elsie Rochna,541-923-0896.

Feb. 27
RENEGADE ROLLERGIRLS : The Renegade Rollergirls will perform a 30-minute expo scrimmage “Rumble in Redmond,” as part of the 2009 Oregon Sports and Fitness Expo; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

Feb. 28
MODELING AND ETIQUETTE: Learn the tools of modeling, beginning with business skills then onto runway instruction, makeup application and hair styling. Ages 10 and up; $80; Class starts Feb. 28 and continues March 1; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
MAKE YOUR OWN ROOT BEER: MAKE YOUR OWN ROOT BEER
Learn how to make, bottle and cap a six pack of root beer to take home. All materials provided. Ages 7-12; $16; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond High School Hartman Campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-923-4840.
DIXIELAND CONCERT: The Cascade Brass Quintet performs; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1032.
“MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions and Canyons Fine Dining presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater performance; dinner includes salad, choice of entree and dessert; $55 includes dinner and show; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Canyons Fine Dining, 1857 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-7999 or www.buckboardproductions.com.
AUDITIONS FOR ANNIE: Redmond High School Theatre Department is holding auditions for its production of Annie May 5-9. Middle and elementary school kids will be cast for the parts of orphans and the lead of Annie. Dogs are invited to audition for the role of Sandy from 2:30-4 p.m; free; 9:30-2:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; Phil Neely,541-923-4800, ext. 2065.

March 5
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

March 6
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

March 7
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

March 8
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.
CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: Band standards, show tunes, orchestra transcriptions, marches and more performed under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-593-1635 or www.cascadewinds.org.
BATTLEFIELD BAND: A traditional Scottish music performance; $20-$25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

Obituaries

Robert Brian O’Neal
Sept. 27, 1971 - Feb. 6, 2009
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 504-9485
Services: A Celebration of Life was already held. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Washington Mutual account #3173463577 in the name(s) Of Kyle, Kasey and Sean O’Neal.

James Patrick Harrington
Feb. 10, 1938 - Feb. 10, 2009
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 504-9485
Services: No services will be held.
Contributions to: Partners in Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Bill E. Beeks
Sept. 16, 1953 - Feb. 12, 2009
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home - Bend, 541-382-0903
Services: Private memorial gathering at a later date.
Contributions to: Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Millie May Hoyt
Feb. 9, 1937 - Feb. 8, 2009
Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 447-6459
Services: A memorial service was held in her honor on February 14, 2009.

Ida Frances Martin
Aug. 29, 1930 - Feb. 2, 2009
Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 382-2471
Services: No services are planned.

John Sharp
April 19, 1914 - Feb. 10, 2009
Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733
Visitation will be held 2-5 p.m. Thursday, February 19, 2009 at Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 NE 4th St., Prineville, OR. A Celebration of Life will be held 11 a.m. Friday, February 20, 2009 at Calvary Baptist Church, 2241 N. Main St., Prineville, OR. A graveside service will be held 2:00 Friday, February 20, 2009 at Juniper Haven Cemetery, 1555 N. Main St., Prineville, Oregon.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Pioneer Memorial Hospice 1201 NE Elm Street, Prineville, ORregon 97754 or Ochoco Humane Society 1280 SW Tom McCall Rd., Prineville, OR 97754.

Loyd Priday
July 19, 1918 - Feb. 10, 2009
Loyd Priday died following a long illness on February 10, 2009.
There was a private family graveside service at Redmond Memorial Cemetery with a memorial service at Redmond Presbyterian Church February 17.
He was born in the The Dalles, Oregon on July 19, 1918, the son of H. L. and Nellie Priday. He had two brothers, Farrell and Morris, and a sister, Vernamay. He grew up on the historic Priday Ranch at Willowdale. He married Doris Lytle on August 10, 1941, at the Cross Keys Church on the ranch.
In the 1950s he farmed at Cinder Butte near Redmond and in the 1960s at Lower Bridge. He later worked for the Deschutes Farmers Co-op and then worked for a mobile home service. He was an active member of Oregon Farm Bureau, the Terrebonne Grange, the Terrebonne school Board, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association and the Redmond Presbyterian Church. He helped build the new Presbyterian Church. He was a 17-year member of the Redmond Hospital Board and served on the Redmond Rural Fire Board for many years. He is survived by his wife, Doris; sister, Vernamay Corwin, Madras; three children, The Rev. Harold (wife Lena) Priday, Siguatepeque, Honduras, Raymond of Powell Butte, and Dr. Judy Peabody, Beaverton; six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Redmond Presbyterian Church or the Redmond Rural Fire Board.
Redmond Memorial Chapel was entrusted with the final arrangements 541-548-3219

Evelyn Helen Concannon
June 12, 1926 - Feb. 8, 2009
Evelyn Helen Concannon, 82, died February 8, 2009; she was a resident of Redmond since 2003.
Evelyn was born June 12, 1926, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa to Guy & Bertha (Nelson) Cooper. She attended schools in Cedar Rapids where she graduated in 1944 from Franklin High School.
She later met and married Keith Concannon on April 4, 1948, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Evelyn was a homemaker throughout her married life.
Evelyn was preceded in death by her mother and father, husband and two brothers. She was a devoted and loving wife, mother and grandmother, and enjoyed quilting, cooking and her cat, Andy. Survivors include one son, Gregory Concannon of Redmond, OR, one daughter, Diane Concannon-Turk of Woodinville, WA, five grandchildren and one great- grandchild.
Graveside services will be held in Cedar Rapids, Iowa at Cedar Memorial Park.
Contributions in memory of Mrs. Concannon may be made to Hospice of Redmond-Sisters, 732 SW 23rd, Redmond, OR 97756.
Redmond Memorial Chapel has been entrusted with the arrangements.
www.redmondmemorial.com, 548-3219.

,.

February 10, 2009

Event calendar

WEDNESDAY
Feb. 11
COOKING WITH MOMMY: Interactive class for tots and mommies. Decorate cookies, make fun shape sandwiches and creative drinks. Ages 2-5; $20; 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
DIXIELAND CONCERT: The Cascade Brass Quintet performs; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1032.
HISTORICAL COMMISSION: Redmond Historical Commission meeting, 1 p.m., Suite 303, Historic Redmond Hotel, 521 S.W. Sixth St; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
FIRE BOARD: Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1 board meeting, 7 p.m.; 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; agenda at www.redmondfireandrescue.org.

THURSDAY
Feb. 12
UN-VALENTINE PARTY FOR TEENS: No sappy poetry here! Make a chocolate sculpture, break a piƱata, make duct tape black roses. Ages 12-17. Register online at www.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
“POWER SELLING ON EBAY”: Learn how to clean out unwanted treasures and make extra money selling on eBay. Preregistration required; $59; 6-9 p.m., and class continues Feb. 19 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc.edu.
CITY CENTENNIAL: Redmond Centennial Advisory Committee; 5 p.m., conference room A, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; information 541-923-7755.
RAPRD: Redmond Area Park and Recreation District board meeting 6:15 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way; information 541-548-7275.
STUDENT THEATER: Obsidian Middle School Drama Club presents an original play, “Murder at Camp Sasquatch” in the school gymnasium, 6 p.m. The play was written by students, admission is free and donations are appreciated.

FRIDAY
Feb. 13
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council goal setting workshop, 8 a.m.-noon; 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

SATURDAY
Feb. 14
FREE DAY AT DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: In celebration of Oregon’s 150th birthday the museum is offering free admission and cake; free; 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org.
VALENTINE SWEETHEART DINNER: A candlelit gourmet dinner with music. Free childcare provided. A silent auction and sale of Valentine gift baskets will coincide. Hosted by the church youth group to raise money for upcoming missions; $20 suggested donation per person; 5-7:30 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367.
FREE COFFEE: Dutch Bros. Coffee is giving away free 16-ounce beverages with every donation of three cans of food, which will be donated in NeighborImpact; donate at 1501 S.W. Highland or 650 N.W. Jackpine Ave.

MONDAY
Feb. 16
NO SCHOOL DAY FUN: Sports, arts and games for kids in grades K-5. Bring a sack lunch; $25; 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.

TUESDAY
Feb. 17
SOCIETY OF THE ARTS MEET: Artist Michelle Oberg will lecture and demonstrate block printing. Open to all; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 S.W. 29th St., Redmond; Linda, 541- 279-0007.
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meeting 6:45 a.m., 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PUBLIC ART: Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places meeting, 4 p.m.; conference room A, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
REDMOND PARKS COMMISSION: meeting, 6 p.m., conference room A, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

THURSDAY
Feb. 19
GAME DAY FOR TEENS: Play Wii, Guitar Hero, Rock Band, and more. Ages 12-17. Register online at www.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
BEHIND THE OREGON FLORA PROJECT : Linda Hardison will speak about the Oregon Flora Project, a comprehensive database of Oregon plants, and discuss how to use the information when gathering plants; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; Eileen, 541-923-2777 or www.oregonflora.org.

FRIDAY
Feb. 20
KIDS NIGHT OUT: For kids K-5. Basketball, batting cage, contests, arts and crafts, movies, pizza; $15; 6-9 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
AUTHOR TOM DEWOLF: Presentation by Bend author Tom DeWolf on his book, “Inheriting the Trade: A Northern Family Confronts Its Legacy as the Largest Slave-Trading Dynasty in U.S. History.”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

SATURDAY
Feb. 21
4-H DOG SHOW: Dogs R Us Fun Match for all ages. Show and classes for all levels of experience. Showmanship, obedience and rally obedience for dogs and their handlers. All dogs must be current on vaccines. Admission is free for spectators. Registration opens at 8:15 a.m.; $5 per class; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-280-3856.
FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; event made possible by Mid Oregon Credit Union; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
HANDCRAFTED DENIM BAGS: Learn how to turn a pair of old jeans into handbags. Personalize with decorative stitches, iron on appliques and jewels. Ages 10 and up; $20; 9 a.m.-noon; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.
DUCT TAPE CREATIONS: Learn how to turn duct tape into unique yet functional items. Ages 9 and up; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.
CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Menu includes Dungeness crab, bread, salad, beer and wine. 21 and over only. Tickets are available at CL Printing and St. Thomas Academy of Redmond. Proceeds benefit the student technology program of St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $20 per person; 4-8 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Hall, 12th Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-548-3785.
COSMIC SWIM NIGHT: Games, music and cool cosmic lights for middle-school students (must show ID); $2.50; 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

MONDAY
Feb. 23
EFFECTIVE DISCIPLINE TECHNIQUES: Interactive class for parents, childcare providers and early childhood educators on proper discipline techniques; $18; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.

TUESDAY
Feb. 24
HARLEM GLOBETROTTER’S “SPINNING THE GLOBE” WORLD TOUR: Basketball show includes ball-handling tricks, slam dunks and family comedy; $16-$60; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-790-2787.

THURSDAY
Feb. 26
CREATIONS WITH SHRINKY DINKS: Choose or create your own design, trace it, cut it, and bake it. All materials provided. Ages 12-17. Register online at sww.dpls.us/calendar or sign up at the door. Space is limited to 25; free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
CENTRAL OREGON WRITERS GUILD MEETS: Local author Paty Jager will speak about “Promotion 101 - The Nuts and Bolts of Promoting You and Your Writing.”; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; Elsie Rochna,541-923-0896.

FRIDAY
Feb. 27
RENEGADE ROLLERGIRLS : The Renegade Rollergirls will perform a 30-minute expo scrimmage “Rumble in Redmond,” as part of the 2009 Oregon Sports and Fitness Expo; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

SATURDAY
Feb. 28
MODELING AND ETIQUETTE: Learn the tools of modeling, beginning with business skills then onto runway instruction, makeup application and hair styling. Ages 10 and up; $80; Class starts Feb. 28 and continues March 1; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
MAKE YOUR OWN ROOT BEER: Learn how to make, bottle and cap a six pack of root beer to take home. All materials provided. Ages 7-12; $16; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond High School Hartman Campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-923-4840.
AUDITIONS FOR ANNIE: Redmond High School Theatre Department is holding auditions for its May 5-9 production of Annie. Middle and elementary school kids will be cast for the parts of orphans and the lead of Annie. Dogs are invited to audition for the role of Sandy from 2:30-4 p.m.; free; 9:30-2:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; Phil Neely,541-923-4800, ext. 2065.

THURSDAY
March 5
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

FRIDAY
March 6
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

SATURDAY
March 7
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

SUNDAY
March 8
CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMENS SHOW: Casting ponds, a free kids’ trout pond, seminar theaters and camp cooking; $9 adults; $5 kids 6-12; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.
BATTLEFIELD BAND: A traditional Scottish music performance; $20-$25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

MONDAY
March 9
DUKE ELLINGTON ORCHESTRA: A jazz performance led by Paul Mercer Ellington, son of Duke Ellington; $30 and $40; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SATURDAY
March 14
GREAT CHORALE WORKS CONCERTS: Featuring the Cascade Chorale, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7401 or www.cascadechorale.org.

SUNDAY
March 15
GREAT CHORALE WORKS CONCERTS: Featuring the Cascade Chorale, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 3 p.m.; Summit High School, 2885 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-383-7401 or www.cascadechorale.org.

RHS Theatre Department presents comedy
The Redmond High School Theatre Department presents the comedy farce, “Dilemmas with Dinner,” by Robin Roberts, Feb. 19-21, 7 p.m., each night, and Feb. 22, 2 p.m. in the high school auditorium. When a junior executive invites her tongue-tied boss and his half-wit wife over for dinner in the hopes of securing a promotion, she discovers that the hired help is the boss’ hated ex-daughter-in-law. Tickets are $5.Information: Phil Neely, 541-923-4800, ext. 2065.

Friends Language Exchange
Free Spanish conversation practice and lessons are held each Saturday, 9:30-11:30 a.m., at Santiago’s Mate Company, 528 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond. A French conversation group also meets Saturdays, 1:30-3:30 p.m., at the same location. Information: Barb, 541-447-0732.

Soroptimists sell candy
The Soroptimist club is selling See’s candy for $13 a box. Contact Norma Brenton, 541-923-8066.

A chicken in every yard

Some are into it to save the planet – eat local and organic – or for the nutrition, the companionship, or maybe just because it seems fun.
Whatever the reasons, backyard chickens are fast becoming the Victory Gardens of the new millennium: It's hip, it's money-smart and it makes you feel good about yourself.
When Sherry Elbek got her first chickens 12 years ago, she was in it for the poop.
“I'm a maniac gardener and I needed organic fertilizer,” she said. “I researched which breeds would give me the best poop for gardening and I started with 20 chickens.” She and her husband John have a couple of acres just south of Redmond and the sterile soil of Central Oregon on their property was crying out for help.
“I kept planting more and more in the garden so I needed more poop to keep up,” said Elbek. Eventually she had as many as 100 chickens. Today there are less, but she's getting ready to gear up again.
Although Steve Oberg was born and raised on a farm, it was cattle, not chickens, and he never thought much about joining the poultry craze.
But when he and his wife Bev retired to 115 acres in Powell Butte nearly three years ago chickens began to seem like a nice accompaniment to their new buffalo ranching enterprise.
“It was a slowly evolving decision,” said the retired university professor. “It just doesn't seem like a real farmyard without chickens roaming around.”
Shirlee Evans is a more typical “urban” chicken raiser, if you can call Redmond urban. The physical therapist and new city councilor lives on an average city lot, but her drive to live green and eat organic prompted her to add a few chickens to the backyard landscape nearly 10 years ago.
“To me it's about closing the loop,” said Evans. She and her husband Ron buy chicks every spring, keep the laying hens for about 18 months, then butcher that batch before winter falls. Next spring, it starts again and in between they use the chicken poop to fertilize their garden, feed their chickens scraps from the garden and kitchen and harvest the eggs, in a full circle of food production.
Raising chickens, whether it's a half dozen or so like Evanses or more than 100 like the Obergs, isn't rocket science, they say, but it pays to do a little research first.
When the Obergs first began they heard chickens were good for gardens: they eat bugs, leave poop and till up the soil with their claws. The couple penned a few roosters in their deer-proof vegetable garden.
“In one afternoon they ate every green scrap, every blossom,” said Steve Oberg with a chuckle. “There was nothing left.”
Make a note: Chickens are omnivores so don't let them loose anywhere there's anything you want to stay growing.
When Elbek began, she had one main chicken house for roosting, laying and feeding. Before long she realized that when it was cold the hens crowded inside and created so much havoc eggs were broken before collecting could take place. Today she has a small shed divided into three compartments.
“Chickens like a nice dark, quiet place to have babies,” she said. “All eggs are all babies to them.” Although it is possible to buy 'pre-sexed' chicks from a feed store or the Internet, the system is not foolproof, as all three chicken farmers learned.
“We ended up with a rooster in one year's batch of hens,” Evans recalls. “We tried to give it to my mom, who lives in the country, but she figured it out right away and we had to come get it.”
Although most folks who raise chickens do it for the eggs, or organic meat, no one can deny the charm of chickens, who can be quite tame if they spend enough time with people.
“Sometimes we just sit out in the yard and watch them,” said Evans. “They can be pretty entertaining.” If she catches field mice she feeds them to the flock, a move that can prompt a game she terms “poultry rugby” – you can guess what the ball is.
“It's so funny when they lay an egg, they boast about it with lots of clucking and fussing,” she added.
The Obergs now have their yard full of chickens, now a “real farmyard,” but the free-range eggs haven't come without a price. It didn't take long for them to realize it was important to wait until the morning laying time was up before opening the door to the chicken yard. “They were laying eggs all over the place and we never wanted to eat them because you never knew if they were laid that day or days ago,” Steve said. In addition, they have learned to protect landscape plants they treasure, and give the rest over to chickens.
Although Elbek has neighbors fairly close by, Evans, who lives within city limits, is the one who really knows how to raise chickens without raising the hackles of neighbors. It's pretty simple, she says: no roosters, keep your coop and yard clean to avoid odor and share your extra eggs. “With the economy the way it is raising chickens seems like a good idea to encourage,” Evans said.
Elbek concurs. “There’s not a lot of income in backyard farming but there is a lot of savings.”
All three families agree on one downfall of raising chickens: finding a chicken sitter is not easy. Chickens need daily care, bringing food and water and picking up eggs. ”It can keep you pretty close to home,” said Steve Oberg. “We ask neighbors for help but we don’t want to abuse their friendship.”
Maybe that’s where those free organic eggs come in.

-- photo and story by Leslie Pugmire Hole

Chicken Q & A

Where to I buy chicks?
Feed stores stock chicks every spring, your best choice if you just want a few. If your research has sold you on a particular breed, as if you can ‘reserve’ that type of chick. If you want a dozen or more, you might want to try some online sources.

What do I do with a chicken that no longer lays eggs?
You can butcher if for the dinner table or try giving it away as a pet.

How many laying chickens do I need for my family of four?
Three good layers are about right to get a dozen eggs weekly.

How can I make sure I don’t buy a rooster?
You can buy “pre-sexed” chicks to guarantee hens.

What about the bird flu?
The bird flu does not currently pose a major threat in the U.S. and it is not easily transmitted from person to person.

What can I feed my chickens?
Chicken feed, fresh garden clippings, bugs, kitchen scraps.

Isn’t Central Oregon too cold to raise chickens?
No. It has to get very cold, into the teens, to bother chickens. Simple steps such as coating their combs with ointment o avoid frostbite and putting a heat lamp in the coop will help.

Can I start my backyard flock anytime?
If you‘re starting your flock with chicks do so in spring, March through May, when they are most available. They will begin laying in about five months (slacking off some in winter when days are short).

How long will my hens lay eggs?

Hens produce eggs for 2-3 years on average.

Sources: City chicken.com; Backyardchicken.com; OSU extension

Example yearly chicken budget (6 laying hens)
$10 chicks
$60 feed
$110 chicken pellets
Total cost $180
Yield –104 dozen eggs
Cost (if purchased) - $364
** Not calculated is the cost of setting up your coop

Chicken Regs

Rules within Redmond city limits - If your home lot is an average 4,000 square feet you could have as many as eight chickens, but only if their coop could be situated on your lot at least 50 feet away from any neighboring homes, AND towards the rear of the property. Additional rules about adequacy of fencing and sanitation also apply. See zoning regulations at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

Oregon law regarding egg sales- A producer does not need a license if the producer is selling and delivering eggs of the producer's own production directly to an individual consumer. A producer may also sell without an egg handler license, if they sell only ungraded eggs to a dealer.

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Local obituaries

Dale Bannon
June 5, 1925 - Jan. 25, 2009
Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 447-6459
Services: A Funeral Service was held on Monday, February 2, 2009. Contributions can be made to: Our Savior's Lutheran Church building fund, 695 NW 3rd St., Prineville, OR 97754 or Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Laura Ruth Short
Aug. 8, 1961 - Jan. 29, 2009

Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 548-3219
Services: Celebration of Life Service was held February 6, 2009.
Burial will be at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park in Madras, OR.

Darren Patrick Tooley
Oct. 17, 1970 - Jan. 18, 2009
Services: A celebration of Darren’s life will be held at a later date. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Humane Society.

Juanita Mae Orourke
Aug. 22, 1933 - Jan. 27, 2009
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 548-3219
Services: No services are planned.

Marjorie Ruth (Gordon) Kurtz
Aug. 27, 1933 ~ Feb. 6, 2009
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, of Bend. 541-382-0903Services: “Home - Going Service” at Trinity Lutheran Church, Wed. Feb. 11, 2009 at 1:00pm. Contributions may be made to Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 NE Butler Market Rd., Bend, Oregon 97701

Jean Louise Yost
Feb. 23, 1938 - Feb. 6, 2009
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 504-9485
Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 28th at the Daysprings Christian Church in Terrebonne.

Eleanor (Weedon) Mace
Oct. 7, 1921 ~ Feb. 5, 2009
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, of Bend. 541-382-0903
Services: No services we be held.
Contributions may be made to: Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

James J. “Jim” Edwards
April 11, 1932 ~ Feb. 5, 2009

Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, of La Pine. 541-536-5104
Services: Scattering of the ashes at sea will be at a later date.

Jessie Belle Donovan
Nov. 10, 1913 - Feb. 2, 2009
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 541-504-9485
Services: No services planned.

Hairle L. Parsons
July 15, 1962 ~ Feb. 4, 2009
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, of Bend. 541-382-0903
Services: Private family gathering at a later date.

Ruth Ann Cunningham
Dec. 14, 1937 - Feb. 1, 2009
Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 447-6459
Services: No local services will be held.

Shirley S. (Kibbey) Flaherty
Jan. 24, 1947 - Feb. 4, 2009
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, Bend 541-382-0903
Services: Graveside service was held at Mountain View Cemetery in Walla Walla, Wash. on Feb. 10, 2009.
Contribution may be made to Hospice of Redmond & Sisters, 732 SW 23rd Ave., Redmond, OR, 97756

Laura Ruth Short
Aug. 8, 1961 - Jan. 29, 2009
Our dear Little Laura, Laura Ruth Short, passed peacefully away January 29, 2009, surrounded by her family.
Laura was born to Robert and Sarah Lovina Short August 8, 1961. She lived with her family as she was educated by Warm Springs and Madras schools, the Opportunity Center, and the loving tutelage of her teacher-mother.
She went on to work as "clothing specialist" at the Redmond Thrift Store. Laura took her job seriously and made many good friends there.
Her kind, gentle nature and smile that brightened everyone's lives made her a joy to be around. She had a great sense of humor and could be overcome by laughter. The fact that she was chromosomally enhanced (Down's Syndrome) made her all the more lovable.
Laura loved being a companion to her mom, dancing, making crafts with sisters, watching the Fiddlers, going to the Highland Baptist Church and hanging out with friends Joyce and Barbara, Mick Harris, Pam Harris, and Rose Palmer at the group home.
Laura was a cohesive force among family and friends. Her subtle gifts to us will never be replaced. While we have lost her earthly presence, she has gone on to join her mother, father and sister Kathy, and friends Mick and Joyce.
Surviving Laura are her sisters, Ginny Rosenkranz, and husband, Patrick, Marjie Reinig and husband, Bill; nephews, Crispin Rosenkranz, Zachary Reinig, Nikolas Reinig, and niece, Jessica Reinig.
Donations may be made to the ARC of Central Oregon.

Barbra Rae Bates
March 7, 1943 - Feb. 1, 2009
After a brief battle with cancer, Barbra Rae Bates, surrounded by family, passed away peacefully at her home in Redmond, Oregon on Sunday, February 1st at the age 65. Barbra was born on March 7, 1943, to Raymond and Evelyn Yadon in Fairview, Montana. Because of a raging blizzard, she was brought home from the hospital in a horse drawn sleigh. A few months after her birth, the Yadon family moved to Vanport, Oregon where Barbra's father worked in the shipyards during World War II.
Barbra graduated from Reynolds High School in 1961 where she was lead soprano in the choir, belonged to a seven girls singing group named the Seven Teens, and was a proud member of the Future Homemakers of America.
Barbra married her high school beau, Allen Bates, in 1963 and they moved to Ontario, Oregon where Allen managed the family car business. During this time, Barbra was a homemaker and was on the local hospital auxiliary board and a member of the Jaycees, a social service group. This is also when Barbra and Allen had their first daughter, Kelly Rae Bates in 1964.
Barbra and her husband moved to Gresham, Oregon in 1966, where their second daughter, Belinda Jo Bates, was born in 1970. In 1985, Barbra and her husband divorced and Barbra went back to school. While earning her college degree, she worked for the law firm Vick & Gutzler. Barbra was a paralegal assistant to Judith Hudson Matarazzo until Barbra's retirement in 2000. Barbra remarried in 1990 to James Oeder and, in 2004, they settled in Redmond, Oregon.
Barbra was an active volunteer in the reading programs, Oasis in Gresham and SMART in Redmond, and was a member of the Oregon Legal Assistant Association for the State of Oregon for many years. She enjoyed life to its fullest and especially loved spending time with her family and her grandchildren in particular. Barbra had a passion for travel, reading, going to plays and the arts, staying fit through walking, Pilates and yoga, and socializing with her friends in the social groups, The Lunch Bunch and Newcomers/Oldcomers. She also took pleasure in training and playing with her Parsons Russell dog, Mr. Wilson and the newest addition to her household, Abigail the Siamese cat.
Barbra was an intelligent, dynamic and beautiful woman. She was a devoted daughter and sister, a faithful wife, a supportive mother and a loving and guiding grandmother. The earth will be a little less bright with her departure, but heaven will shine that much more on her arrival. Barbra will be greatly missed, but her influence will live on.
Barbra was preceded in death by her parents, Raymond and Evelyn Yadon and her older sister, Dolores Schwenk. Barbra is survived by her husband, Jim Oeder of Redmond, Oregon; daughters and sons-in-law, Kelly and Ron Bateman of Gresham, Oregon and Belinda and Travis Hampton of Redmond, Oregon; grandchildren, Grant and Taylor Bateman of Gresham, Oregon and Delaney and Bethany Hampton of Redmond, Oregon; and younger sister and brother-in-law, Nikki and Ron Manza of Portland, Oregon.
At Barbra's request, there will be no services. In lieu of flowers, please make contributions to Redmond Hospice.

Juanita ‘Nita’ Mae Barks O'Rourke
August 22, 1933 - Jan. 27 2009
Juanita M. "Nita" O'Rourke, 75, from Culver, died January 27, 2009 at her home after a courageous battle with cancer. No services will be held at her request.
Nita was born August 22, 1933 in Lyons, Kansas, a daughter of Joseph and Mae Barks. She was raised and educated in Arizona.
She married Bernard F. "Barney" O'Rourke, November 24, 1950, in Phoenix, Arizona. Barney's service in the U.S. Navy required them to move frequently. They lived in San Diego, CA; various cities in northern Virginia; Fall River, MA; and Valparaiso, Chile. Upon his retirement in 1972, they moved to a ranch at Kimberly, Oregon. Nita lived in the Redmond/Culver area for the past ten years.
She enjoyed dancing and big band music, word puzzles and the game of Scrabble. She was a wonderful mother who was very active in the lives of her six children. She adored her grandchildren and cherished the time she spent with them.
Survivors include her children and their spouses: Berney and Donna O'Rourke; Mike O'Rourke; Pat and Chris O'Rourke; Angel and Max Mills; Sheri and Jim Stirewalt; Kelly and Scott Gross; her brother, Marion Douglas Barks; sixteen grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Redmond Memorial Chapel in charge of arrangments. www.redmondmemorialchapel.com

Lyle DeanHammack
June 24, 1951 – January 30, 2009
At 57 years his journey came to an end at the Veterans hospital in Portland. Lyle lived in Eugene, he was raised in Sisters, Oregon where his heart was always at. He was born in Redmond, Oregon to Wesley Milton Hammack (deceased) and Dona Lee (Abbott) Hammack. Lyle married Margie Lea (Smyth) Hammack in Sisters; May 25, 1974. They own 5 acres in Eugene & have 2 horses & 2 dogs; George Strait & Bubba who they love dearly. Lyle went to school in Sisters, when it was a quiet little logging town of about 600 people. In 1969 Lyle joined
the Marines during the Vietnam conflict. He received the Good Conduct Medal & National Defense Service Medal and an honorable discharge from the Marines as a Corporal. He belonged to the U.S.M.C. Reserve Force until 1975. He was a true Warrior, a true Marine and fought hard to live. He stood for something and fought for what he believed in. Coming from a family of 8 kids, he was tough and had a heart of gold. Lyle loved all kids and had time for them. He loved his nephews and nieces and was like a 2nd father to them. He would even get down in the
dirt, play with the Tonka Trucks and build roads with them.
Lyle worked in the woods and drove for Harold Barclay Logging in Sisters, Oregon. He moved to Eugene and worked several different jobs in Eugene: Logging,
Driving Cattle Truck, Fertilizer Truck, worked for Eugene Auction Yard and was a Brand Inspector. He also traveled to Murphysboro, Tennessee with Frank White to show Tennessee Walking Horses. He was a man of many hats . . .
Lyle is a cowboy, “Ranch & Rodeo”. He worked the Wild Horse Race with his brothers Jack and John Hammack and his friends. They were undefeated in the 1970’s & early 1980’s. He also Teamroped with his family, Tom, John, Ron & Jay Hall and his brothers and friends. He belonged to the Northwest Professional Rodeo Association and judged many Rodeo’s, also many High School Rodeo’s. When his nephew John Hall, presented Lyle with the P.R.C.A. Columbia River Circuit Finals Buckle that he had won in the Steer Wrestling. Lyle was estatic and wore that buckle with pride. Lyle helped with his families “Bull Bashes” they produced in Central Oregon from 1992 to 1997. When he got well, “he had a dream” to raise P.B.R. Bucking Bulls. He never missed a P.B.R. Bullriding on TV. He knew the Bulls and he knew the riders, some
personally. He so enjoyed camping, hunting & fi shing with family from Margie’s side and his side. At our family Pow Wow, one of the highlights of his life was when he received
his “Chinook” Indian name Honoring, given to him by his Aunt Gladyce Damewood in 2003. Lyle was proud of his Indian heritage. He believed in our creator, our
Great Spirit. His Indian name is “Kahkwa Nika Tum Tum” which means: “As my heart thinks”.
Lyle is survived by his wonderful wife, Margie; Mother, Dona Hammack; Sisters, Patty (Patricia L. Hammack) Hall & (Tom); Denise L. (Hammack) Burger & (Andy); Brothers, John E. (Maura) Hammack, Jack W. & (Lori) Hammack, Jim E. & (Kristi) Hammack & many aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, cousins, brother-in-laws, sisters-in-law & lifetime friends. Lyle has gone to join, “with a tear in his eye”, his “Dad”,Milton Hammack, brother Dick Hammack, sister
Rebecca (Becky) Sue Hammack-Ward, Uncle Verl Hammack and his Grandparents: George Ernest Earl Hammack & Mable Lilas Hammack & Harold Henry (Hank) Aboott & Verda Dean (Bay) Abbott.
A CELEBRATION OF LIFE Service will be held on Sunday, February 15,
2009, at 1:00 p.m., Redmond Grange Hall with a potluck luncheon to follow.

William Hendrich
Jan. 11, 1922-Jan. 17, 2009
William A. Hendrich was born in Lincoln County, Kansas on January 11, 1922 to Anna and Joseph Hendrich. He was the next to the oldest of ten children. William attended rural schools through eighth grade, graduating in 1936 and completed his GED later. He farmed with
his father until he was drafted in November of 1942. He served in the 21AIB in Europe, including three major battles: The Battle of the Bulge, The Battle of the Ardennes and The Battle of the Rhine. His unit emancipated the Matthausen Prison Camp on the Danube River in
Austria at the end of the war. There he witnessed the depth of the evil and inhumanity
of the Hitler regime.
On November 25, 1948, he married Barbara Briggs of Kansas City, Kansas. After their marriage, William continued to farm until a relapse of rheumatic fever caused him to leave farming. He worked in sales in Sterling, Kansas; Sacramento, California; and Bend, Oregon, retiring in 1987. William and Barbara were best friends and lovers throughout the sixty years of their marriage. William loved the Lord Jesus Christ supremely, and served as a deacon-servant for over 50 years. His prayer was that his children and grandchildren after him would know and serve the Lord.
He is survived by his wife, Barbara, his five children: Gordon (Laurie) of Knoxville, TN; Phyllis Hartin (Don) of Citrus Heights, CA; Margaret Blankenfeld (John) of Lacey, WA; Howard (Donna) of Grass Valley, CA; Alice Hendrich of Bend and his fourteen grandchildren and ten great grandchildren.
Donations in William’s memory may be given to Billy Graham Evangelistic Association,
1 Billy Graham Parkway, Charlotte, NC 28201-0001.