February 23, 2010

The Maverick Mary Conn Brown

Mary Conn Brown, center, climbed mountains, flew airplanes, swore like a sailor and drank like a soldier -- all the while running a business, The Redmond Spokesman, for 40 years.


Journalist, adventurer, crusty, a hard drinker and even heavier smoker, feisty and foul-mouthed – all those terms have been used to describe the Redmond Spokesman’s most memorable and longest tenured publisher and editor, Mary Conn Brown.

“She was five feet tall and weighed at most 100 pounds. Yet she maintained a powerful presence for 40 years as a newspaper editor in a town otherwise run by men. As tough, intelligent or tenacious as she had to be in anything, she was. Beyond the paper and print shop, it applied to climbing mountains, flying airplanes and maintaining her ribald, eccentric personality in a town where that, too, was not encouraged,” wrote Barry Stranahan, who as a teen worked for Brown, and whose mother, Martha Stranahan, was also a noted Central Oregon newspaperwoman.

She was born Mary Elizabeth Conn on Oct. 19, 1905, in Lakeview, the daughter of La Fayette Conn, then in his 40s, and Lora Butler Conn, 25 years his junior.

“Mary was very adventurous, very smart and very eccentric.
She jumped out of airplanes, for heaven’s sake -
you never knew what she’d be doing.
Judge Conn, who died in Lakeview at age 77 in 1938, was born in Roseburg in 1861, and graduated from Willamette University. He practiced law in Salem before moving to Lakeview in 1892, where he served as district attorney and circuit court judge. He married schoolteacher and music teacher Lora Fern Butler of Dallas, Ore., in 1901. In addition to daughter Mary, they had a son, Theodore, two years younger.

In the mid-1920s Mary Brown headed off to college at Willamette University in Salem, but left after learning the school prohibited dancing. She transferred to the University of Oregon, where she spent time as day editor of the Oregon Daily Emerald, graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in journalism and met Redmond boy and fellow journalism student Joseph Colbert
Brown, son of Edward and Daisy Brown, who were in the creamery business.

After graduation Mary headed to Bend, where she was a reporter for The Bend Bulletin. The 1930 census lists newspaper reporter Mary Brown as a lodger at a rooming house at Broadway and Louisiana in Bend.

By the fall of 1931 Joe and Mary were married. After buying The Spokesman in the fall of 1931 for $10,000, the Browns set out to modernize it, buying the latest model Linotype, a typesetting machine, in 1932.

“Mary was a pea on a hot skillet;
close to a constant motion machine.”

“The Redmond Spokesman has decided to look like a newspaper, as well as act like one,” they wrote. “Besides living in Redmond, we are also living in 1932. A modern newspaper, in a modern town, cannot be published with 1910 printing equipment.”

Through the decade The Spokesman also acquired a new press and added new features, such as comics.

By 1939 The Spokesman had won the prize for top weekly in the state three consecutive times and was awarded permanent possession of the Hal E. Hoss Trophy (though somehow it still remains at the Malheur Enterprise).

In accepting the award Joe Brown gave “full credit for the accomplishment to his wife, Mary Brown,” said an article in The Bulletin at the time.

In a 1978 interview Mary recalled the key to success: “National news has no place in the weekly paper. That’s how you get the edge on the radio and TV. You know you have to carry the local chitchat.”

Barry Stranahan describes a day at The Spokesman in the 1960s: “Harry Sly was in charge of the press room, so he was ultimately responsible if the page was off-register, smudged, faint or incorrectly placed. He was not much taller than Mary and permanently bent forward as he was, could and would jaw chin to chin with her. Mary , too, could and would be ready to do just that. They each had their own 60 or so years behind them and would square off as equals, Harry with a cigar stub clenched in the corner of this mouth and Mary with a menthol in hers. And they would converse in long strings of phrases I could not, for reasons of propriety, even think to relate here. Presently they would come to an understanding. Harry would utter one last glorious string of what pretty much summed it up to him and head for his toolbox. Mary would turn and head back toward her office in the front of the building, stopping to talk to a couple of the back room workers on the way. But she’d be checking back.”

Brown was co-editor and publisher of The Redmond Spokesman from 1931 until 1955, when she became sole publisher after she and Joe divorced.

During World War II, when Joe was away serving in the Navy (he served aboard and eventually commanded the USS Susquehanna, a tanker), Mary Brown ran the The Spokesman with the help of local housewives and in 1942 was elected the first female president of the Oregon Press Association.

“She was a newspaper person Number One.
She had a tremendous gift for spelling and grammar;
she was tough when it came to journalism, a real perfectionist.
She’d sit at an old manual typewriter and bang out stories lickety split.”

Yet Mary Brown’s life was lived far beyond the newspaper office and her personality made a big impression on the community. A petite woman, Brown was often seen rushing down the sidewalk in high heels with a pad of paper and pen in one hand and a cigarette in the other – always a Tareyton in a long holder. In her later years she sported hair dyed jet black and clothes more suited to girls a fraction her age.

An airplane ride when she was a child left a lasting impression and Mary vowed to learn to fly, eventually earning a commercial license.

“I can’t think of anything I liked better than flying,” Brown recalled in a 1980 interview in The Bulletin. She continued to fly well into her 60s.

Brown served for 20 years on the Redmond Airport Commission, 10 as secretary, taking the minutes, handling the books, filling out stacks of applications for federal grants, and taking calls when the public toilet at the original terminal needing unclogging.

She was also one of a group who each contributed $10 to purchase 40 acres at Cline Falls to build an airstrip to fill in while the Army used what was to become Roberts Field. The group borrowed graders, got to work and the strip was ready for take-offs and landings that day.

Mary also skied (and broke her leg skiing at Skyliners west of Bend in February 1939) and climbed mountains, including all the Cascades peaks except St. Helens and Adams.

In August 1928, she and a fellow female Bulletin staffer, Mary Ellen Foley, made the hike up Bachelor Butte (now Mt. Bachelor) by moonlight, leaving Bend after work. After a delay due to car trouble they started the hike about 11 p.m. and reached the lookout station at the top about 1:30 a.m. They were back at work by 7 a.m.

In July 1937 Brown and good friend and frequent climbing companion, Nellie Nooe (later Sly) reached the summit of Mt. Rainier in Washington using a new route up Cadaver Gap.
Over the years South Sister was one of Mary Brown’s favorite places in Central Oregon’s backyard to show others. She took her nephews and their friends, Scouts and visitors up the mountain.

After 24 years of marriage and no children, Mary and Joe divorced and life changed. As both publisher and editor of the Spokesman, time for climbing mountains and other adventures grew short. Joe remarried a younger woman and went on to have several children, eventually moving to Washington State.

Always close to her brother Ted, Mary treasured her time with her nephews, especially Truman, who often came to stay in Redmond. As a youngster she would allow him to sit on a stool and watch the huge letterpress.

Mary wasn’t just adventurous on weekends; she was no stranger to innovation or change in the professional realm. In 1967 she continued to modernize the paper, abandoning hot lead (and its aroma) for modern offset printing, a move Spokesman production manager Jim Sage described as taking real guts. It also meant the end of the line for printing The Spokesman in Redmond. Brown contracted with The Bulletin in Bend for printing press services.

A few years later Mary approached Sage with an idea to invest in a “quick print” business, a direction both saw the printing industry heading. The pair opened Pronto Print in Bend and operated as partners for several years before Sage bought her out.

After selling the newspaper to Western Communications in 1971, Brown retained the printing business, Midstate Printing, but it wasn’t the same as owning a newspaper.

“When she decided to sell the paper I remember telling her that she should sell the print shop and keep the paper; that’s where her passion was. After she sold and did just printing, she was sad,” said Sage. “(Before she sold the paper) every time a politician hit town, their first stop was to see Mary Brown. The fire chief, police chief – (if you were smart) you kept the editor on your side. When she sold the paper all these people never came back. I felt that bothered her. She went from a very important person to ordinary.”

After retirement (she sold Midstate in 1980) Mary settled into a little house near downtown with 13 cats and a big black sheepdog that used to accompany her to work. She worked a while for the new owners of the print shop but it wasn’t the same.

“It doesn’t smell like a print shop anymore,” Brown lamented at one point. “Kinda miss it.”
After suffering a few years of poor health Mary Brown died Oct. 6, 1982, at age 77. Her ashes were scattered on Mount Jefferson.

-- story by Trish Pinkerton andLeslie Pugmire Hole
Spokesman staff

Event calendar

GPS Navigation
COCC’s Community Learning department is offering a class on GPS navigation March 9 and 11, 6-9 p.m., at the Redmond campus. Learn basic operating features of hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers through classroom exercises and field practice. Bring your GPS and owner’s manual to class. Cost is $39. Information: 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Dirt bike and ATV class

The Deschutes County 4-H Natural Resource Program is sponsoring ASI and MSF ATV and Dirt Bike RiderCourse certification classes for youth 6 to 17 March 13 and 14. Classes are available from 8 a.m. to noon, or 1-5 p.m. Participants must supply their own ATVs/Dirt Bikes and approved riding gear: helmets, gloves, long sleeve shirts, heavy fabric pants, goggles, and boots that cover ankles. Preregistration is required and fees apply. Information: 541-548-6088 online at www.deschutes4h.com. Hands-on training will be mandatory for youth 15 years and younger starting Jan. 1, 2012.

Household item donations sought for shelter
The Humane Society of Redmond is accepting donations of new and gently used items (no clothing) for a fundraising Spring Garage Sale March 5, 6, 12 and 13 at the shelter, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Donations can be dropped off at the shelter weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Information: 541-923-0882.

RHS alum to speak at banquet
Todd Dickerson, a 1992 Redmond High School graduate, will be the guest speaker at the annual Central Oregon Youth for Christ banquet Feb. 26, 7 p.m., at Redmond Community Church, corner of Northwest Ninth and Cedar Avenue. The annual banquet is an opportunity to introduce community members to the goals and ministry of the national organization and what it is doing in Central Oregon. Dickerson will share how the organization impacted his life as a high school and college student and as an adult. Open to the public. Reservations requested. Information: Jennifer, 541-548-5464 e-mail Jennifer@co-yfc.org

Wednesday
Feb. 24
SCHOOL BOARD: Redmond School Board meeting, 5:30 p.m., public is welcome; 145 S.E. Salmon Ave.; agenda at www.redmond.k12.or.us.

THURSDAY
Feb. 25
BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Town Builders”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30-11 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
CHOCOLATE TASTE TEST PARTY: For teens 12 to 17. Test your taste buds and take the chocolate taste test. Take the candy bar personality test and see what your favorite candy bar reveals about your inner personality. Chocolate provided; free; 3:15-4:45 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1063.
VOLUNTEER CONNECT LAUNCH CELEBRATION: Celebrate the launch of a new regional volunteer center; free; 5-7 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave., Redmond; 541-385-8977, info@volunteerconnectnow.org or www.volunteerconnectnow.org.
LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION CLASS: Taught by Dennis and Martha Sargent of Central Oregon Contractor Training. The course satisfies education requirements to take the Oregon contractor’s license test. Preregistration and prepayment required; $275, includes manual; 6-9 p.m., and class continues Feb. 26 and 27 from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.
CENTRAL OREGON WRITERS GUILD MEETS: Enes Smith, author of “Fatal Flowers,” “Cold River Rising,” and “Dear Departed,” will share fun facts that writers can use when building characters that include nonverbal and verbal cues to deception, which may help identify if someone is lying. Open to the public; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; Elsie Rochna,541-923-0896.

FRIDAY
Feb. 26
BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Town Builders”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30-11 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of antiques and collectibles, including books, jewelry, art and more; proceeds benefit the Keep Them Warm program at Bend’s Community Center; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-312-2069.
LINDY GRAVELLE PERFORMS: Local singer/songwriter Lindy Gravelle will perform; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; WineStyles, 249 N.W. Sixth St., Suite 1, Redmond; 541-526-0489.
POLAR PLUNGE: Plunge into the icy Deschutes River in a costume; proceeds benefit Special Olympics Oregon; $50 minimum donation, free for spectators; 6:30 p.m., 4:30-6:15 p.m. registration, 6 p.m. costume contest; Riverbend Park, Columbia Street and Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-452-6079 or www.plungeoregon.com.

SATURDAY
Feb. 27
REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-480-4495 or http://redmondgrange.org.
“STONES FROM THE SKY” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features 45 aerial photographic prints of landscapes by Michael Collier; exhibit runs through June 27; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of antiques and collectibles, including books, jewelry, art and more; proceeds benefit the Keep Them Warm program at Bend’s Community Center; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-312-2069.
BASKET OF HOPE: Featuring food, children’s activities, live music and more; gift baskets will be raffled to benefit Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 3075 N. Highway 97, Bend; 541-389-1618, kim@casaofcentraloregon.org or www.casaofcentraloregon.org.
BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art, body movement, stories and songs; this month’s theme is “Town Builders”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 1-2:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
WHEN I’M IN CHARGE: This class is designed to empower children to respond safely to a variety of home alone situations, especially in an emergency. For ages 9 to 11; $20; 1-3:30 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275.
LIFT-A-THON: Local bodybuilders and power lifters demonstrate strength and endurance by lifting as much as they can; proceeds benefit High Desert Special Olympics and Bethlehem Inn; $5 or a paper product; 7 p.m.; The Black Horse Saloon, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4270 or http://bend-supplements.com/High-Desert-Classic.
SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by indie-rock band Noah Gundersen & The Courage; $15, $10 students per show; $40, $30 students for all three shows; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road, Sisters; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

SUNDAY
Feb. 28
BIOGRAPHY, KATE CHOPIN: Stacey Donohue discusses the life of American author Kate Chopin; free; 1:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
“ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the story of a charming rogue committed to a mental institution; adapted from the novel by Ken Kesey; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.
SUZANNE VEGA: Cerebral folk rocker performs, with the Crown City String Quartet; $35-$40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY
March 2
HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC - CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET: String musicians will be joined by Don Foster to play selections from Wolf, Schumann and Weber; $30, $15 children and students with ID; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-306-3988, info@highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic.com.
PLANNING COMMISSION: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission meeting; public is welcome, 7 p.m.; conference room Z, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

WEDNESDAY
March 3
“SPANISH COMPUTER CLASS — FIRST STEPS”: Covers mouse skills, scrolling and other basic tasks with Windows 2000 operating system. Taught in Spanish. Preregistration required; free; 3:30-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1066 or sarahv@dpls.us.
TOWN HALL MEETING: Sen. Chris Telfer (R-Bend) and Rep. Gene Whisnant (R-Sunriver)invite the public to discuss the February 2010 Legislative Session; 4:30-6 p.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond; 503-986-1453.

THURSDAY
March 4
LATINO FILM FIESTA: The third annual cultural event hosted by the Latino Community Association features a screening of award-winning films from Mexico, Bolivia and Chile; $5-$10 suggested donation; 5-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-382-4366 or www.latinocommunityassociation.org.

FRIDAY
March 5
SPRING GARAGE SALE: A sale of new and gently used items; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.
TASTE OF THE TOWN: Featuring live music and restaurants, bakers and caterers offering food samples; $35 in advance, $45 at the door; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama Gymnasium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-8268, Barbara@impressive-events.net or www.thetasteofthetown.org.
FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5 to 9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend.

SATURDAY
March 6
SPRING GARAGE SALE: A sale of new and gently used items; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.

SUNDAY
March 7
FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-4 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-7395.

MONDAY
March 8
DODGE BALL GAME: Mr. Redmond High School and Mr. Sisters High School pageant participants square off, with a silent auction; proceeds benefit the pageants’ contributions to the St. Charles Bend neonatal intensive care unit; $3; 7:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-923-4800.

Seaside on the Shoulder

As wet and windy as coastal locales tend to be in Oregon, few names are able to conjure up mental images of sand, sea, and sun – but Seaside must be one of them.

With its strolling promenade, white sand, lifeguard tower and carnival rides, Seaside attracts hordes every summer for the typical beach experience.

However, those in the know travel to Seaside during its shoulder season because while all the salt water taffy stores may not be open, the restaurant lines are short (or nonexistent), the beaches are calm (even if the waves are not) and the deals on lodging can’t be beat.

I know what you’re thinking: What about the weather?

Yes, the north Oregon coast is known for rain, heavy overcast days and occasionally biting wind – but so what? Some days it’s not.

Sure, you may hit a pristine July day in Seaside when the surf is friendly, the light is sparkling on the waves and the sand is warm but you are just as likely – even in summer – to encounter a low layer of cloud cover, as if someone threw a dingy gray blanket over the town.

Vacationing on the Oregon coast means learning to take the weather in stride.

What is there to do in Seaside in the off-peak months? Nearly everything you can do the rest of the year, but with less crowds and wet feet. You can golf (open year round), take a helicopter tour (weather permitting), build a sand castle (expect cold toes) or shop.

Some stores do trim their hours in the off-season but there are so many to choose from you won’t even notice the lack.

When the rain comes, and it will eventually, you have two choices: run away to fun indoor activities or embrace the wet. Believe it or not, a stroll along the beach or along wood trails can be very enjoyable in inclement weather and the upside is you’ll have it nearly to yourself!

One word of warning, however – if it is seriously storming you should avoid the woods (with blow down, not lightning being a risk), and keep one eye on the waves at all times.

A couple of insider’s tips on things often missed by visitors who flock to the beach:

Don’t skip a visit to The Cove, the second home for local surfers, fishermen and wave watchers. This spot on Seaside’s extreme southern end is a great place to sit and contemplate or hike along its rocky edges. (Left off Avenue U and right on Sunset Boulevard)

The city of Seaside and a local land conservancy have set up a scenic wayside on the town’s northern boundary, adjacent to Highway 101. Interpretive signs highlighting native culture, explorers Lewis and Clark and the biological diversity of river estuaries (Neawanna Creek and the Necanicum River meet here on the way to the sea, which is visible from the wayside) are a feature, along with a walking path that leads a short way into the local forest. (Highway 101 where Seaside meets Gearhart)

Don’t miss the part of Seaside east of the river that divides the town. It may seem like all the action is near the beach but the other side of the river has some great shops, restaurants and sightseeing. It is the historical part of town and many of its older buildings have been lovingly restored.

If you don’t like to gamble on vacation weather and don’t consider it a trip to the beach without spotting a bikini or two, visiting Seaside’s shoulder may not be for you. But if you like to budget your holiday money wisely and don’t mind a permanently wet umbrella, don’t write off a visit to the shore during the lesser months.

Out of the wet

Buck’s Book Barn
1023 Broadway
{Great rambling used book store}
Tenth Muse Books
111 Broadway, Suite B
{Independent book store, espresso}
Funland Arcade
Corner of Broadway & Columbia
{Skee ball, pool, arcade games etc…}
Universal Video
47 N. Holladay
{Old-fashioned video store, lots of classics}
Bagels by the Sea
210 S. Holladay
{Great deli, reliable Wi-Fi, fun hangout}
Seaside Historical Museum
570 Necanicum Dr.
{Small but thorough museum}
Seaside Aquarium
200 N. Prom
{Classic seashore attraction, complete with seals to feed}
--story and photo by Leslie Pugmire Hole

Obituaries

Alfred Henry Gulstrom, of Prineville
May 21, 1922 - Feb. 12, 2010
Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459
A funeral service was held on February 18, 2010 at the Prineville Presbyterian Church. A burial mass was held at Redmond Memorial Cemetery in Redmond
Contributions may be made to Prineville Presbyterian Church, 1771 N. Madras Hwy, Prineville, OR 97754.

Marion Elizabeth Spooner, of Crooked River Ranch
April 14, 1930 - Feb. 12, 2010
Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592
www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com
Services were held on Wed., Feb. 17, 2010, at Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 63875 N. Hwy 97, Bend, OR.

Randy A. Scharlund, of Powell Butte
Dec. 1, 1954 - Feb. 14, 2010
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219, www.redmondmemorial.com
Time and date of service will follow at a later date.

Alta June South, formerly of Fossil
July 22, 1919 - Feb. 13, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 541-504-9485
No services will be held.

Allen Rede King, of Burns
Mar. 29, 1928 - Feb. 13, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 541-504-9485
No services will be held.

J. Douglas James
June 12, 1918 - Feb. 7, 2010
Sue James
August 18, 1921 - Feb. 12, 2010
Sue and Doug James, recently of Redmond, Ore., died the week of February 7, surrounded by their five children and two sons-in-law.
J. Douglas James was born to John Warren James and Nelle Becker James in Springfield, Ohio, on June 12, 1918. He graduated from Wittenberg University in 1941 and was pursuing graduate studies at Temple University in Philadelphia, Penn., when he met his future bride, Sue Constanzo. They courted by correspondence for the three years that Douglas served as a medic in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska during WWII.
Sue James was born to Nicolo and Rosina Constanzo in Philadelphia, Penn., on August 18, 1921. Designated one of the ten outstanding seniors at Temple University, she graduated in 1942 with a degree in Education. Sue and Douglas were married on November 4, 1945 in Philadelphia before moving to Springfield, Ohio.
Doug and Sue attended Christ Episcopal Church. Their faith in Christ was central to their relationship. They ran the James Lumber Company before building the first two modern nursing homes in Springfield. Through his work as Administrator of New Horizons and Ethan Allen Manor, Doug devoted his life’s work to providing compassionate care to dozens of seniors and their families. One of Sue’s greatest joys was her 23 years of teaching history and social studies at Ridgewood School, where she was much loved by her students and colleagues.
The couple shared a love of the arts, which was a gift they passed on to their children. Douglas enjoyed classical music and playing piano. Sue loved to dance, teaching modern dance to her children and their friends. She enjoyed roles in several community theater productions. Sue was one of the original organizers and Chair of the Summer Arts Festival. An avid reader, Douglas enjoyed working at the library, after his retirement.
In 1990, Doug and Sue moved to Redmond, Ore.. They were active members of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church. Doug continued to play tennis with new friends for some years and served as a volunteer at Hospice of Redmond-Sisters. He loved walking his boxer in the Dry Canyon and exploring the beauties of Central Oregon.
Sue was employed as a Spiritual Coordinator at Hospice of Redmond-Sisters for 16 years, retiring in 2008. During this time she was ordained to the Episcopal deaconate and served as a pastoral caregiver at St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. She was ordained to the priesthood in December 2001, serving at St. Alban’s through 2008.
Douglas and Sue are survived by their five children: Cynthia Lamb Faust, Deborah Bradshaw, Barbara Coleman, Claudia James, and Greg James, as well six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. They are also survived by: Doug’s sister, Joan Wagenseller and extended family; Sue’s cousins, Dante Costanzo, Anita Troilo, and extended families of cousins, nieces and nephews in Italy, Toronto, and Philadelphia.
A joint memorial service in Redmond will be held in March. Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements, 541-548-3219.

Donald Boyd Brown
March 14, 1912 - Feb. 19, 2010
Donald Boyd Brown, age 97, a long-time resident of Redmond, Oregon, passed away from natural causes on February 19, 2010.
Don was born in Portland, Oregon, on March 14, 1912, to Roy and Nora Brown. He spent part of his youth in the Culver/Metolius area, and attended high school in Portland, graduating from Benson Polytechnic School. He had five sisters: Mildred McClay of Redmond, Oregon, Gwen Hird of Lawrence, Massachusetts, Dorothy Brown, Lucille Meeks, and Margaret Darby.
In his youth, he and his father had a logging business. He then worked as a mechanic, where he developed a fascination for automobiles. He was part of the Civilian Conservation Corps, and hauled mercury for the Horse Heaven Mercury Mine. He then worked for Babbler Brothers on the construction of the Redmond Airport. He was the purchasing agent for Lyle H. Cobb Construction Company, where he met his future wife.
Don married Mae Madison on January 27, 1945, in Kelso, Washington.
Don and Mae moved to Redmond in 1946, and started their life together. He worked for the City of Redmond for 28 years, and was the Supervisor of the water purification plant. He retired in 1975.
Don is survived by his wife, Mae Brown; son, Douglas Brown and his wife, Margaret Brown of Petaluma, California; his daughter, Wanda Tigard and her husband, Conan Tigard of Redmond, Oregon; his granddaughters, Shawna Brown and Cierra Tigard; as well as his sisters, Mildred and Gwen. He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy and Nora Brown; three sisters, Dorothy at age four, Lucille and Margaret; and his daughter, Donna Mae Leamon and her husband, Wayne Leamon.
A private family graveside service will be held.
Donations may be made to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation, PO Box 515, Northampton, MA, 01061-0515.
Website: http://www.macular.org/.

Marilyn LaVonne Hubbard
Oct. 16, 1923 - Feb. 11, 2010
Marilyn LaVonne Hubbard died on the morning of February 11, 2010, at the age of 86. The Portland native was born to Maurice and Ruth Michaels on October 16, 1923.
As a young woman, Marilyn lived many places throughout the country such as New York, Florida, and in Central Oregon for more than 40 year. In addition she spent time in the U.S. Coast Guard. She married Donald Hubbard in the mid 1950’s, and the couple had daughter, Beverly, in 1956, followed by son, Robert, in 1958. Marilyn could be described as a woman who loved other people and lived life to the fullest. She was also incredibly selfless and elegant with a penchant for reading and traveling.
Marilyn is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Beverly and Tom Baier; son and daughter-in-law, Robert and Carol Hubbard, and grandson, Robert Hubbard, Jr. She also leaves behind her “grandkits”, Emmy and Pooh.
There will be a Celebration of Life held at the Berry Park Retirement Community in Oregon City, where Marilyn lived for over two years, on February 28, 2010, at 1:30 pm.
The family has requested that donations be made to Providence Willamette Falls Hospice in lieu of flowers. Arrangements were handled by Crown Memorial Center in Milwaukie. Please sign the guestbook at www.anewtradition.com/obituaries

Randy Alfred Scharlund
Dec. 1, 1954 - Feb. 14, 2010
Randy Scharlund born on December 1, 1954, died in his home in Powell Butte of a heart attack on February 14, 2010. He was 55 years old.
A 1973 graduate of Springfield High, he worked 11 years for Pape' Cat in Eugene and lived in Lane County for 44 years. He married the love of his life, Jeanne Bjelland, in May of 1986, in Lincoln City, OR. Randy had his own business in Central Oregon, Scharlund Custom Painting. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne of Powell Butte, OR; sister, Lynda (Dale) Prock of Springfield, OR; and sister-in-law, Connie Norman of Redmond, OR; two nieces and five great-nieces and nephews. Randy will be greatly missed by his family and friends.
A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Saturday, February 27, 2010, at 12 p.m. at Redmond Memorial Chapel, 717 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR. 541-548-3219.
Contributions may be made in Randy's memory to the Humane Society of Redmond. See Redmond Memorial Chapel guest book for condolences at http://www.redmondmemorial.com/

February 9, 2010

Event Calendar

WEDNESDAY
Feb. 10
HAPPY FEET WHIFFLE BALL AND T BALL: For ages 3 to 5. This class is as fun for toddlers as it is to watch; $3; 1-1:45 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275.
HISTORY: Redmond Historical Commission meeting; 2 p.m.; Redmond Museum, 529 S.W. Seventh St. Agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us
SCHOOLS: Redmond School Board meeting; 5:30 p.m.; district office, 145 S.E. Salmon Ave. Agenda at www.redmond.k12.or.us
FIRE: Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1 board of directors meeting; 7 p.m.; 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.
GFWC MEETING: The General Federation of Women’s Clubs (GFWC) of Central Oregon. Program speakers are Deb Gazauskis and Cheryl Brown of FreeStoreRedmond. Guests are welcome. GFWC is an international women’s organization dedicated to community improvement through volunteer service; 6:30 p.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, 436 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; Diane Bodden,541-923-7374.

THURSDAY
Feb. 11
KEYBOARDING CLASS: Class for beginners or those wanting to improve. Features an introduction to Ultra Key typing software. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org.
GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Three Cups of Tea” by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
DIY VALENTINES FOR TEENS: Teens ages 12 to 17 can make handmade Valentines. Get crazy with bottle cap crafts making necklaces, key chains, magnets and cards. Snacks provided; free; 3:15-4:45 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541- 312-1063.
SPAY-GHETTI BENEFIT DINNER: Spaghetti dinner benefiting the Humane Society of Redmond’s spay and neuter program; reservations recommended; $12.95, $8.95 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.
CENTENNIAL: Redmond Centennial Advisory Committee; 5 p.m.; Redmond Hall, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave. Agenda at ci.redmond.or.us
“MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions presents a dinner theater murder mystery; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $25 in advance, $30 at the door; bring a donation of nonperishable food; 6 p.m., dinner begins at 7 p.m.; The Design Center, 2127 S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-633-0297 or 541-548-6900.

FRIDAY
Feb. 12
INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING: For kids grade 6-12. Experience the fun and challenge of rock climbing in a controlled indoor environment. All necessary equipment is provided. Transportation is provided; $20; 1-4:15 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-548-7275.
BEND WINTERFEST: Winter carnival featuring ice carving, shopping, children’s activities, rail jams, ice skating, live music, beer gardens and more; admission buttons good for all three days; $6 for WinterFest button in advance, $7 at the door; 5-10 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.bendwinterfest.com.
LIVE MUSIC: By The Prairie Rockets; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; WineStyles, 249 N.W. Sixth St., Suite 1, Redmond; 541-526-0489.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Authors Trish Pinkerton and Leslie Pugmire Hole speak about their history book “Images of America: Redmond”; Deschutes County Historical Society President Les Joslin will speak about the book “Images of America: Bend”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

SATURDAY
Feb. 13
“SIN IN THE SAGEBRUSH” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores the lives of people who sought their fortune on the Western frontier; includes a re-created saloon and live portrayals of denizens; exhibit runs through September; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
GARDENING SEMINAR: Hydropics, the art of growing indoors with no soil; free, but reserved seating recommended; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-5418, www.redmondgreenhouse.com
BEND WINTERFEST: Winter carnival featuring ice carving, shopping, children’s activities, rail jams, ice skating, live music, beer gardens and more; admission buttons good for all three days; $6 for WinterFest button in advance, $7 at the door; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.bendwinterfest.com.
ARTIST RECEPTION: Reception for Dave Waters whose art show “Love Poems for All Time” is currently on display. Refreshments will be served.
For ADA information contact Jenny at jenniferp@dpls.us or 312-1064; 1-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064.
CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs an interactive children’s concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; recommended for ages 5 and older; free; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-317-3941.

SUNDAY
Feb. 14
BEND WINTERFEST: Winter carnival featuring ice carving, shopping, children’s activities, rail jams, ice skating, live music, beer gardens and more; admission buttons good for all three days; $6 for WinterFest button in advance, $7 at the door; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.bendwinterfest.com.
VALENTINE’S DAY MURDER MYSTERY DINNER: Buckboard Productions presents “Who Shot the Sheriff?” an interactive murder mystery dinner theater; reservations recommended; $55; 5 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700.

TUESDAY
Feb. 16
“WESTERN PORTS OF OUR PAST”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Curt Lantz; free; 10 a.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.
PUBLIC ART: Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places; 4:30 p.m.; city hall, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave. Agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us
PLANNING: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission; 7 p.m.; city council chambers, 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave. Agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us

WEDNESDAY
Feb. 17
“BORROWING BASICS”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about credit and loans. Preregistration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY
Feb. 18
GAMES DAY FOR TEENS: Teens 12 to 17 can play Nintendo Wii, Guitar Hero, Rock Band, and more. Bring in your own games if rated E or T. Snacks provided; free; 3:15-4:45 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541- 312-1063.

FRIDAY
Feb. 19
LIVE MUSIC: By The Heleos; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; WineStyles, 249 N.W. Sixth St., Suite 1, Redmond; 541-526-0489.

SATURDAY
Feb. 20
FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; overflow parking and shuttle service available at Morning Star Christian School; free; ; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
BEGINNING FLASH ANIMATION CLASS: Learn how to create basic animations in Flash that can be used in Web pages. Preregistration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc.edu.

Amputee support group meets
Central Oregon League of Amputees, a support group for those who have lost limbs — as well as their families — meets each month alternating between Bend and Redmond locations. This month the group will meet in Redmond at 6 p.m., Feb. 15, at Black Bear Diner, corner of Northwest Fifth Street and Cedar Avenue. The group is in the process of creating a Web site and hopes to establish a foundation to help people who don’t have health insurance. For more information, contact the group’s president, Sonya Parks, at 541-480-7420, email crawfordparks@gmail.com, or Woody Woodward, 541-548-6219.

Sweet Adelines will sing to valentines
Surprise your sweetheart with a song performed live by quartets from Central Oregon’s Sweet Adeline’s Chorus. Musical Valentines will be available Feb. 12, 13 and 14 at homes, workplaces, schools, restaurants, and hospitals. For $40, the quartet will perform two romantic songs and present the recipient with chocolates and a personal greeting. To book a “Valgram,” call 541-526-5006 or 541-416-0394. Credit cards accepted.

Adopt a pet at a special price
The Humane Society of Redmond presents “My Furry Valentine,” Feb. 8-13 at the shelter, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. For a week, the shelter will offer special rates on adopts of cats and dogs. Complimentary Valentine gift bags given for dog adoptions (first 25). Information: 541-923-0882.

Kidsing Musical Adventures

The Redmond Public Library will host Kidsing: Musical Adventures, each Friday, 10:15 to 11 a.m., now through March 5. Children ages 3 to 5 will explore music through songs, movement, games and instruments, with hands-on fun. Sponsored by the Cascade Community School of Music and the Friends of the Redmond Library. Free. Space is limited to 20 children per class. Information: 541-312-1054.

RHS slates auditions for 'Peter Pan’
The Redmond High School Theatre Department will hold auditions for its production of Peter Pan March 2 and 3 for high school students, and March 6 for all other ages in the high school auditorium. Performances are scheduled for May 18-21, 7 p.m., and May 22, 1:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 advance or $12 at the door. Information: Phil Neely, 541-923-4800, ext. 2065, or e-mail phil.neely@redmond.k12.us.

Obituaries

Westley Charles Cosgrove
Oct. 3, 1936 - Feb. 7, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Bend, 541-318-0842.
Memorial service, Thursday, February 11, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 230 NE 9th Street. Bend, OR.

Gloria Joy Geraths
April 15, 1934 - Feb. 4, 2010
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903
At her request no service
Contributions: TRES ISLAS Orphanage Fund, 3717 Monroe, Ave. Cheyenne, Wyoming, 82001

Gay B. Circolone
Feb. 26, 1938 - Feb. 5, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Bend, 541-318-0842
Services: Private family services will be held.
Contributions may be made to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701.

Helen Wilhelmena Baker
July 21,1919 - Jan. 30, 2010
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903
Memorial Service to be held 3 pm to 5 pm , Feb. 13, 2010 at: Cheerleaders, 913 NE 3rd St., Bend, OR

Cleo Ada Shofner
Sept. 22, 1917 - Jan. 31, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Bend, 541-318-0842
Services were held on Thursday, February 4, 2010.

Wilbern Elgin Lossing
April 10, 1916 - Jan. 31, 2010
Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733
Services: None at this time.
Contributions may be made to a charity of ones choice.

Thomas Bruce Johnson
July 9, 1937 - Jan. 31, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Bend, 541-318-0842
No services will be held at this time.

Abbie A. Lochrie, of Bend
June 14, 1934 - Jan. 22, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals Bend, 541-318-0842
No services will be held at this time.

Andrew Leason Gregg
Aug. 24, 1923 - Feb. 3, 2010

Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219
Contributions may be made to Humane Society of Redmond