July 20, 2010

Obituaries

Kenneth L. DeLapp, of Redmond
April 26, 1932 - July 15, 2010
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel
541-548-3219, www.redmondmemorial.com
Services: Celebration of Life on Saturday, July 24, 2010, 2:00 p.m., Redmond Memorial Chapel.
Contributions may be made to: Partners In Care Center, 2075 Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Daniel ‘Dan’ Arol Thompson, of Portland
May 24, 1958 - June 19, 2010
Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459
Services: A Memorial service will be held on Sunday, July 25, 2010 at 1:00 p.m. at The Powell Butte Christian Church.

Robert "Bob" C. Stanton, of Redmond
Dec. 14, 1940 - July 17, 2010
Arrangements:Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.com
Services: None.
Contributions may be made to: Redmond Fire and Rescue.

Merrill Young Barnes, of Redmond
Oct. 14, 1927 - July 11, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net
Services: No services to be held.

Betty SusAnn Steele, of Crooked River Ranch
Nov. 13, 1944 - July 14, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net
Services: Private - at later date.

July 14, 2010

Event calendar

THURSDAY
July 15
STORY TIME, BABY STEPS: Ages 0–18 months; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
“HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; noon-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.
TEEN PROGRAM, VIDEO GAMING: Check out what’s new for our Wii and PS2! Bring in your own games if rated E or T. Snacks provided. For grades 6-12; 1-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
CRR FIRE: Crooked River Ranch Rural Fire Protection District board of directors meeting; public welcome; 6:30 p.m.; agenda items include discussion of the Deschutes 911 service district agreement; CRR fire station.
BARK-B-QUE DINNER: Barbecue with ribs, burgers, hot dogs, potato salad and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $15, $11 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.

FRIDAY
July 16
NARFE MEETING: National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association annual potluck picnic and monthly meeting; hamburgers and hot dogs will be furnished, bring a potluck dish to share with serving utensils, your own nonalcoholic beverages, table service, lawn chairs. Eat at noon. A short business meeting will follow picnic; 11 a.m.; Cline Falls State Park, OR 126, 4 miles west of Redmond; 541-548-2228.
RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE: Please call to schedule an appointment; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-382-5882.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
DINNER AND DANCE : Prime rib dinner, stay and dance to the music of Stagecoach West from 7 to 11 p.m., open to everyone, reservations available for dinner, not necessary for dance; dinner $10 per person, dance $6 ($4 for VFW or Auxiliary members); 6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-923-8591,541-548-4108.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook presents a slide show and talks about his book “Bend, Overall”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

SATURDAY
July 17
LIVE MUSIC: Anastacia Scott will perform her folk/alternative/rock music blend at Cross Creek Cafe; 7 p.m.; kid and dog friendly venue; free; 807 S.W. 8th St.
DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races, including a kids Splash ’N Dash to benefit The Center Foundation; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@freshairsports.com or www.freshairsports.com.
CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: Featuring more than 40 activity booths, jump houses, dance and karate demonstrations, food and more; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; free admission, 50 cents per activity ticket, $20 all-day pass; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-385-7988 or www.saving-grace.org.
PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY LECTURES, THE STARS AND YOU: A discussion about how stars create the essential building blocks of life and how they are distributed throughout the universe. Gain an understanding of the famous “Drake equation” for estimating the likelihood of life elsewhere; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Mary Lou Dobbs talks about her book “Repotting Yourself”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

SUNDAY
July 18
DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@freshairsports.com or www.freshairsports.com.

MONDAY
July 19
REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling fresh produce. Debit cards and Oregon Trail cards accepted; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com.

TUESDAY
July 20
STORY TIME, TODDLIN’ TALES: 18–36 months, second story time follows at 11:15 a.m; 10:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
RIVER READERS: A weekly creative program for ages 6-11. Enjoy stories, games and crafts, all about things wild, wet, and wonderful; 1:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meeting, public welcome; 6:45 a.m. and 7 p.m.; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PUBLIC ART: Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places meeting, public welcome; 4:30 p.m.; 716 S. W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PLANNING COMMISSION: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission meeting, public welcome; 7 p.m.; 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at ci.redmond.or.us.
TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637.
WIRE WRAPPING/JEWELRY MAKING: Ages 9 and up. Create wire jewelry pieces that will impress friends and family. All levels welcome. Parent must attend for 9-12 age group; $15 ID, $19.50 OD (13 years & up), $25 ID, $35.20 OD (9-12 years); 6-8 p.m.; Britz Beads, 249 N.W. 6th St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

WEDNESDAY
July 21
MUSIC IN ACTION: Upbeat mix of songs, creative movement, story telling and comedy will be presented for all ages by troubadour and music educator Rich Glauber; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “Our Food Revolution: The Increasing Appetite for Local Options”; reservations required; free; 5-6 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, next to Mirror Pond Gallery, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com.
MUSIC IN THE CANYON: John Shipe Trio; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com.

THURSDAY
July 22
STORY TIME, BABY STEPS: Ages 0–18 months; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
CHILDREN’S CONCERT, HORSE CRAZY COWGIRL BAND: Their skilled musicianship will have you stomping and clapping; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

FRIDAY
July 23
PARKING LOT SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities and community outreach; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; www.redmondchurch.com.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.

SATURDAY
July 24
PARKING LOT SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities and community outreach; free; 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; www.redmondchurch.com.
DOCUMENT SHREDDING AND DRUG DISPOSAL: The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete of Oregon partner to safely destroy personal documents and provide identity theft prevention tips; outdated or unwanted prescription medications will be accepted for disposal; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sisters Sheriff’s Office, 703 N. Larch St., Sisters; 541-388-6655 or www.deschutes.org.
KIDS’ JAM WITH THE BITTERBRUSH BAND – LIVE!: Children can pick from an array of rhythm instruments and play along with the Bitterbrush Band, performing live Americana music; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
BEER FOR BOOBIES: Event features live music, a silent auction and a men’s best-chest competition; proceeds benefit Sara’s Project; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 SW 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883.
MINING DAY: Experience the life of a placer miner, stake a claim and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
SUBMARINE VETERANS PICNIC, MEETING: Hamburgers, hot dogs, silverware and plates provided, bring a salad or dessert to share, bring your own beverages, family and friends welcome, call for directions; 2 p.m.; Home of Rick and Deb Brose; 541-593-8463,541-504-1913.
ORIGINAL AMERICANA MUSIC: Performed by Allan Byer on the restaurant’s patio; 6-9 p.m.; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599.
BAT TALK AND WALK: Join biologists from the Deschutes National Forest to learn more about the fascinating bats of Central Oregon. And, outside after sunset, use special acoustic equipment (“bat detectors”) to record bat calls and identify species; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; Call to reserve your spot; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 ext. 241.

MONDAY
July 26
REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling fresh produce. Debit cards and Oregon Trail cards accepted; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com.

TUESDAY
July 27
STORY TIME, TODDLIN’ TALES: 18–36 months, second story time follows at 11:15 a.m; 10:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
RIVER READERS: A weekly creative program for ages 6-11. Enjoy stories, games and crafts, all about things wild, wet, and wonderful; 1:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637.

WEDNESDAY
July 28
DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR: The annual event includes rides, exhibits, food, games and more; $9, $6 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger and 62 and older; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.expo.deschutes.org.
STORY TIME, PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3–5 years; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring big-band and swing music by Betty Berger Big Band; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com.

Clothes, household goods needed for 'GiveAway’
The eighth annual Great GiveAway! will be held Saturday, Aug. 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is a community effort to gather quality clothing and needed household items for families as they get ready for the coming school year. Community members may come to any of the local distribution sites to either give or receive quality clothing and household items. There is no cost to participate in this event and all community members are welcome. Community volunteers will be collecting items in the two weeks prior to the event and donated items may be dropped off in the two days prior to the main event. This Central Oregon event will be held in Bend, Redmond and Prineville. For locations and more information on what is needed, how to give, and how to participate, call the Great GiveAway! event hotline at 541-678-7656 or visit www.cogga.org.

Workshops target young writers
The Nature of Words is offering Weekend of Words (WOW) for young writers in two sessions this summer: July 23-24 for ages 7-10 and Aug. 20-21 for ages 11-13.
WOW provides creative writing workshops for grade school students and middle schoolers in a Friday through Saturday afternoon format. Each workshop group will create its own story and leave the workshop with a bound copy of the group’s masterpiece. The author and instructors provide ideas and prompts to motivate a collaborative effort.
WOW is conducted at The Storefront Project within The Nature of Words’ literary arts center at 224 N.W. Oregon Ave. in downtown Bend. Each two-day workshop costs $25, payable to The Nature of Words, PO Box 56, Bend, OR 97709. Registrations for the July WOW are due by July 15; registrations for the August WOW are due by Aug. 15.
Workshops are limited to 15 students to ensure a quality experience and ample individual attention. To register visit www.thenatureofwords.org and click on Education and Weekend of Words (WOW) to access the downloadable registration form. For more information or questions, contact Jamie Houghton at 541-647-2233 or programs@thenatureofwords.org.

A newspaper's centennial



The Redmond Spokesman began life as a reincarnation of the Laidlaw Chronicle. The burgeoning community of Redmond already had a newspaper when H.H. and C.L. Palmer packed up their presses and moved from Laidlaw (now Tumalo) in the summer of 1910. W.C. Walker had started The Oregon Hub in Redmond in September 1909.

Henry H. Palmer hailed originally from Michigan; his wife, Clara L. Palmer, from Ohio. Before coming to Central Oregon, the Palmers had worked at the Lewis County Advocate in Chehalis, Wash., where the editor called Mrs. Palmer “an able newspaperwoman.”

According to an “obituary” in The Bulletin of July 6, 1910, the Laidlaw Chronicle died July 3. The article said Henry Palmer had taken charge of the Chronicle 10 months earlier and improved the newspaper’s appearance. However, there was friction between editor and townsfolk from the start.

In addition to owning the newspaper, Palmer was the town band instructor. After he was dismissed (in a tiff apparently over depriving one Neil Ray of his position as tuba player while he was absent from town) Palmer sued the band boys for wages (“8 simoleons,” or $1). Their parents paid rather than go to court, but were not happy.

Palmer apparently blasted the town in the last issues of the Chronicle. Finally, The Bulletin reported, “Editor Palmer of the defunct Chronicle walked out of town escorted by a delegation of Laidlaw citizens armed with cowbells, tin cans, etc.”

Only days later, the Palmers turned up in Redmond, where they published their first issue of The Redmond Spokesman on July 14, 1910, from an office in a wooden building on the east side of Sixth Street, mid-block between E (Evergreen) and F (Forest).

The lead editorial in the first issue said the time was ripe for a second newspaper in Redmond: “We looked ahead to the future of the city and were satisfied that Redmond was destined to become one of the most important cities in Central Oregon. … A newspaper is a mirror or the character, progress and energy of the town in which it is published, and The Redmond Spokesman will aim to show the outside world that Redmond is the best hustling and most prosperous little city in Central Oregon.”

The Palmers jumped into Redmond life. Henry joined the Redmond Commercial Club and several of its committees. Clara joined the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and in later years entered layer cakes in the Potato Show and Fair.

The paper must have been successful, because in September 1911, the Palmers announced the installation of “a new job press of the best make, and a standard paper cutter.” A typesetting machine was due to arrive as soon as the recently-completed railroad into town began accepting freight shipments.

By January 1912, the new Linotype machine had arrived and was put into service. The “almost human” mechanical wonder could do the work of three people. The 1,200-pound Junior Linotype occupied a floor space approximately five feet square and required one-quarter horsepower to operate .

The Palmers noted with pride that “Last week The Spokesman office turned out as fine a piece of printing as could be done at any high class printing office anywhere. It was a letterhead for the Redmond Concert Band. A half tone cut of the band in uniform was printed in black at the top of the letterhead, and the balance of the printing, including a sample program down the side of the sheet, was done in rose geranium red. The Spokesman makes a specialty of high class job printing.”

Things seemed to be going well.

Then, on the night of Monday, Feb. 26, 1912, disaster struck. About 10 p.m., three doors away in Maher’s hardware, a lamp exploded, igniting a fire that destroyed the businesses on the east side of the street: Maher’s Hardware, Hobbs Cash Grocery and Bakery, Wright & Delmore furniture and secondhand goods and The Redmond Spokesman.

The Thursday “fire edition” was printed at The Bulletin, with the press work done at The Hub. The Spokesman estimated the loss at more than $4,000 above the insurance. But “The Spokesman will arise from the ashes better and brighter and ready to continue the good work of telling the advantages of Redmond to the outside world.”

And it did.

As the Oregonian noted in a Feb. 29 editorial: “The Redmond Spokesman, one of the new order of linotype country papers, suffered great loss by fire Monday night but showed its spirit by ordering a new outfit the next day. That is the kind of enterprise that is making Central Oregon a great region.”

After a couple of months in a building formerly occupied by Theo. Herkner’s harness shop, the paper moved into a new building August Anderson constructed of native stone on the site of the old, complete with new equipment, including a new Linotype machine(“the fastest model made”).

The paper seemed to be growing, adding more equipment to the mechanical department to meet customers’ demands : “We can print everything but money,” a news item noted.

A new sign went up atop the stone building — “the best-made and most conspicuous sign in the city. The sign is 24 feet long, three feet wide and carries the words 'The Redmond Spokesman ’ in lettering the facsimile of the 'head ’ of the paper. The letters are gold with a black-sanded background and can be seen for a long distance.”

However, The Spokesman and its editor, Henry Palmer, also became entangled in local politics, and the moral wrangling that grew out of the drinking, gambling and prostitution that accompanied the railroad construction in 1910 and 1911. In 1912, the fiery Rev. J.M. Crenshaw took over as pastor of the local Methodist-Episcopal church and inflamed passions. The brouhaha led to the resignation of the mayor and city marshal, name-calling and fisticuffs in the streets and accusations of libel.

In August 1912, someone broke into the Spokesman office and tampered with the Linotype typesetting machine enough to limit the content of the next issue.

The unpleasantness continued into the fall: “Seven people stopped their subscriptions to The Spokesman since the recent 'league’ agitation in the city. Of course a paper does not like to lose any subscribers, but while those seven were having their names taken off, 27 new names were added, and they all paid in cash, in advance, too, which is more that could be said of the ones who 'stopped’ the paper.”

And in November, “It has come to notice of The Spokesman that some people who do not like the policy of the paper, or the publishers, either borrow, beg or steal a copy of the paper every week in order to see what the news is, and whether the paper has 'slandered’ any one.”

By July 1914, the Crenshaw era was over and the Palmers reflected on the newspaper’s anniversary:

“With this issue, The Redmond Spokesman starts out volume five. Four years ago the publisher of The Spokesman came to Redmond and established the paper here. Since that time various periods of good and bad business for Redmond has been encountered. But during these years that


The Spokesman has been published it has been, first, last and all the time an exponent for the growth and future prosperity of Redmond and this section. During the time of publication of the paper — Feb. 26, 1911 — fire destroyed the plant, entailing a loss of $4,000 to the publisher above the insurance. Notwithstanding this handicap the publisher bought and installed in Redmond the largest newspaper and job plant in Central Oregon at a cost of approximately $12,000.

“In starting out the new year — the fifth year of the existence of The Spokesman — the publisher does so with the best wishes for all the people of this section, and hopes they may enjoy the prosperity that is their due, and most assuredly the due of The Spokesman for the boosting it has done for Redmond and this part of Central Oregon.

“The differences that have existed between certain factions in the city, in which The Spokesman, as a newspaper, has had to take part, we are certain have by this time been healed, and with this first issue of the fifth volume of The Spokesman we wish you all a happy new year and unbounded prosperity and let us all pull off our coats, spit on our hands and work for the future betterment and prosperity of Redmond and this part of Crook County.”

The following week, The Spokesman announced its purchase of the Oregon Hub and the Redmond Enterprise. Noting that there wasn’t room for three papers in an area this size, Palmer wrote, “The Spokesman will always endeavor to give everyone a square deal, and while the publisher may have made mistakes in the past (as we are all liable to do), and made some enemies in Redmond, let us now bury all bygones and pull together and work for a better and greater Redmond.”

In February 1915, Henry Palmer joined the many Redmond-area people caught up in gold fever (gold strikes were reported in the Deschutes River at Cline Falls and Odin Falls, even in Redmond streets). On Feb. 25, The Spokesman reported that 10 quartz mining claims were filed “this week” at Grey Butte, and among the 10: H.H. Palmer, “The Spokesman” mine.

The lure of a fortune in gold may have been hanging in the air, but the reality of business must have led the Palmers to suggest alternatives to cash for their customers:
Sept. 23, 1915 — “Here is a proposition for the farmers who are owing The Spokesman for subscriptions, and one that is intended to help them out in an easy way: Those farmers who so desire can bring in potatoes, pumpkins, or other produce that they raise, and have the market price of same credited on their subscription account, for it will be the same as cash to us.
“We know that ready money just at this time is not laying around loose, so anyone can notice, and we take the above method of getting the back subscriptions paid up and helping the farmer at the same time.
“Farmers desiring to avail themselves of this plan are requested to call at The Spokesman office and ascertain what class of produce we desire before they bring in any.”

The Palmer era ended suddenly when the Feb. 17, 1916, edition of The Spokesman announced that W.M. Pettigrew had taken over as editor and publisher.

A few weeks later, Henry apparently made a sudden exit, Pettigrew noted in the March 9, 1916, edition: “The sudden determination of H.H. Palmer, former owner of the Redmond Spokesman, to leave the town was a surprise to many and it was not until Monday evening that definite knowledge of such step was received. Whatever his faults may have been, he was one of the best mechanical men we have ever known in the business. … The Spokesman is a few hours late this week, owing to the deflection of Mr. Palmer, who left without due notice, which caused us the loss of two days’ time. We will endeavor to avoid the like occurrence, as it is our aim to be as regular as a clock.”

Clara Palmer apparently remained in town, but on March 23, The Spokesman noted “Mrs. C.L. Palmer, having closed up all business here and sold her property, left Sunday morning for the East, where relatives reside.”
The last mention found of the Palmers in The Spokesman comes Sept. 11, 1919 — “While at Portland last week, Billy Wilson received a call from H.H. Palmer, the former publisher of the Spokesman. Mr. Palmer has recently come into possession of a goodly sum of money through the death of an aunt, and is really now on 'Easy Street. ’ He expected to locate in California, but told Mr. Wilson he was not looking for a job, but a place to invest his money. Mrs. Palmer was with him.”


-- by Trish Pinkerton

July 13, 2010

Obituaries

Rita Fahrenbacher Rodgers, of Powell Butte
Nov. 27, 1920 - July 8, 2010
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel
541-548-3219; www.redmondmemorial.com
Services:Rosary, Wed. 7:30 p.m., July 14, St. Thomas Catholic Church, Redmond; Mass of Christian Burial, Thurs., July 15, 2010, 10:30 a.m., St. Thomas Catholic Church.
Contributions may be made to:Hospice of Redmond, Sisters, 732 SW 23rd, Redmond, OR 97756 or Baker Diocese Priest Health and Retirement Fund.

Donald ‘Don’ Judd Lytle, of Redmond
April 16, 1925 - June 29, 2010
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend
541-382-0903; www.bairdmortuaries.com
Services: A Funeral service will be held on Wednesday, July 14, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at Culver Christian Church located at 501 W. 4th in Culver. A private family inurnment Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, OR will occur at a later date.

Kathleen V. Yeager, of Redmond
April 26, 1930 - July 6, 2010
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend
541-382-0903; www.bairdmortuaries.com
No Services are planned per her request.

Raymond Aldon Lynch
October 2, 1930 - July 6, 2010
Raymond A. Lynch of Redmond, died on Tuesday, July 6, 2010, at the age of 79 years. He was born October 2, 1920, in Los Angeles, California, to parents, Raymond A. Sr. and Marjorie (Williams) Lynch.
He grew up in Van Nuys, CA area. He married Nancy in Feb. of 1949. From Van Nuys, they moved to Atascadero, CA, where Ray worked in a cabinet shop and was building houses and many other jobs to take care of the family.
He was always active in his church, and Ray loved his boat, and the whole family were good waterskiers. He also loved cars and car shows. Ray did apartment and hotel management for 25 years. When he moved to Palm Springs, he was chief engineer and manager over maintenance of Lawrence Welk's time share. In 1996, he moved to Central Oregon. Even though he was semi-retired, he worked side by side with his son, Gary, at Lynch Pro-Formance Products and Sprint Car Racing. Ray drove the Sprint car in 2009. Ray mentored many children and adults. He was an active volunteer in the construction of the Highland Baptist Church in Redmond. He was also very active as a deacon, usher, and benevolent ministry. Ray worked in the church kitchen tirelessly. He always had it spotless and loved being there. Ray has reached out to so many people and now he has gone home to be with the Lord.
Besides his wife, Nancy, Ray leaves behind son, Gary and wife, Sharon Lynch of Redmond; daughter-in-law, Jenny Carter in Tennessee. There are five grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his son, Eddie Lynch.
Services were held at the Highland Baptist Church in Redmond July 12, with Redmond Memorial Chapel in charge. www.redmondmemorial.com for condolences to the family.
Memorials may be sent in his name to the Highland Baptist Church.

Rita Fehrenbacher Rodgers
November 27, 1920 - July 8, 2010
Rita Fehrenbacher Rodgers passed away peacefully at her home in Powell Butte, Oregon, on July 8, 2010, with her loving family by her side. She was just shy of 90 years old. A Rosary will be held Wednesday, July 14, at 7:30 PM, at St. Thomas Catholic Church in Redmond, Oregon with a Mass of Christian burial to follow on Thursday, July 15, at 10:30 AM, to remember and celebrate her life.
Rita was born November 27, 1920, in Walla Walla, Washington, to Will and Sarah Fehrenbacher. She grew up on a farm and was the youngest of five children. When World War II was heating up, she fell in love with, and married Air Force bomber pilot, Bobby M. Rodgers. Together they raised four boys. Rita has lived in the Powell Butte area for 28 years, ever since her husband passed away. Rita's love for life always included her family. She was a loving wife and mother, great cook and always was ready to feed any and all who came to see her. From homemade pies and breads, to barbecues for the neighborhood, her cooking was unbeatable. Rita was very dedicated to her faith and helped out at church whenever possible. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bob, two brothers, Leo and George Fehrenbacher and one sister, Mary Bergeron. She is survived by one sister, Cecilia Kirsch; four sons, Neil, Lloyd, Stan, and Paul; eight grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces and nephews. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Material things never meant much to her. She was much more interested in her family and faith. Rita has gone to be with the love of her life, Air Force Major Bobby Rodgers. Donations can be made to Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 SW 23rd, Redmond, OR 97756 or Baker Diocese Priest Health and Retirement Fund. Condolences may be sent to www.redmondmemorial.com

Dora Hinton Jones
Feb. 29, 1925-July 1, 2010
Dora peacefully passed away at home in Redmond on July 1, 2010, with her children by her side. She was born February 29, 1925, in Bucklin, Kansas.
Dora was the youngest of 13 children, all of whom preceded her in death.
She met and married R.T. "Speed" Hinton in 1949. They worked side by side on many projects, including a ranch at Lower Bridge, a cafe in Terrebonne, and The Redmond Hotel. In later years, they took many fun trips to Reno.
Together they raised three children, James, Donald and Charlotte. They lost their youngest son, Donald, in 1967, after a motorcycle accident.
After Speed’s death, Dora moved to California where she married Melvin Jones in 1981. They later moved back to Redmond and did some traveling before his death.
Dora loved music, going on picnics and being with family and friends.
She is survived by her son, James and wife, Phyllis Hinton; and daughter, Charlotte Hinton, both of Redmond; there are eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
Dora will truly be missed by all who knew and loved her.
Graveside services were held on Saturday, July 10, 2010, at 11:00 am, at Redmond Memorial Cemetery.
Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements You may visit www.redmondmemorial.com to send condolences to the family.

July 6, 2010

The Hub of Central Oregon has rivals

Exactly when Redmond began referring to itself as the “Hub of Central Oregon” is not entirely clear.

The community’s first newspaper, Oregon Hub, began printing a year before the city’s incorporation and when its competitor, The Redmond Spokesman, began publishing in 1910 it proudly proclaimed “Published at the Hub City of Central Oregon” on its masthead.
Geography played an obvious role in the nickname; shortly after the turn of the century Central Oregon took form with five main communities – Madras, Sisters, Bend, Prineville and Redmond – and Redmond was in the center, nearly exact equidistant from them all.

But if we are the center of Central Oregon, we’re still not the center of the universe; there are, in fact, numerous communities in the U.S. that consider themselves a hub city – and many of those take great pride in the nickname.

In Layfayette, La., (“The Heart of Cajun Country”) you can eat at the Hub City Diner, shop at Hub City Ironworks and get in some practice at Hub City Rifle and Pistol Range. This southern Hub City, which will turn 200 within a decade, derives its nickname neither from geography or transportation quirks, but from its Deep South culture, steeped in Creole and Cajun history.

Way up north in Hagerstown, Md., a conglomeration of highways, railroad lines and an airport led the town to be called Hub City by some, although the community of about 40,000 also answers to “H-Town” and “Home of the Flying Boxcar.”

Alice, Texas, has many things in common with Redmond. Roughly the same size, Alice uses “The Hub City of South Texas” as its official logo. Alice, named after a rich rancher’s daughter, earned its Hub City legacy because of its location, surrounded by Corpus Christi, McAllen, Laredo and San Antonio.

The community, however, also answers to “The Birthplace of Tejano,” a popular Tex-Mex music style.

Another hub city named in honor of a loved one, Hattiesburg, Miss., earned its nickname because it’s a major lumber and transportation center and its location in the center of South Mississippi. There, you can look for work at Hub City Employment or attend the races at the Hub City Dragway.

One one-time hub city, Mt. Pleasant, Utah, also has a more modern nickname – despite its claim to fame as its county’s largest city – of “Queen City.”

Tiny Union City, Ind., picked up its nickname as Hub City when two major railroad intersected there, as did Oelwein, Iowa, (which is sometimes called “Shop City” due to its one-time wealth of rail repair shops).
Several hub cities, so-called because of their positions as a county seat, have more colorful alternative nicknames.

Phenix City, Ala., received its nickname because of its proximity to a major town, Columbus, Georgia. Much more interesting is its other nickname, “Sin City, U.S.A,” earned during its vice heyday in the middle of the 20th century.

Another, Crestview, Flor., was once known as “The Icebox of Florida” due to its cold winters.

In Crestview you can spend money at Hub City Ford, Hub City Pawnshop or Hub City Glass. No Icebox Café could be found.

Aberdeen, S.D., with rail lines intersecting it, is known more as “The Hub City of the Dakotas,” than its older alternative, “The Town in the Frog Pond,” due to persistent seasonal flooding in its early years.
Centralia, Wash., nicknamed Hub City because of its transportation routes and central location between Seattle and Portland, actually changed its real name.

“We were Centerville originally,” says Jim Valley, executive director of the Centralia-Chehalis Chamber of Commerce. “But there was another Centerville apparently and that was causing confusion.”

According to Valley, while Centralia has been using Hub City in various promotional ways since the turn of the 20th century, there’s been a recent surge in its use. The city uses a historic hub logo and numerous businesses, organizations and events have picked up the nickname.

“I’m not sure if people outside the area associate ‘Hub City’ with Centralia but it means a lot to us here,” he says.

Also on the list of Hub-themed communities are Boston, Mass.; Compton, Calif. (geographic center of L.A.); New Brunswick, N.J.,;Spartanburg, S.C.; Robertsdale, Ala.; and Belen, N.M.

Nearly all have hub-related businesses, such as Hub City Diner, Hub City Dragway, Hub City Cycles, or The Hub Theater. Teens playing at the Rochelle, Ill., high school are the “Hubs.”

Some towns use hub-themed logos for businesses, its chamber of commerce or organizations. Only a few have hub-type images in official city uses, such as Redmond began when its centennial year began in 2010.

“I like the idea of Redmond being identified with the hub logo,” says Redmond Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Eric Sande. “It would be cool to see on put on newly installed sidewalks, manhole covers, etched on windows.” He’s not sure the nickname or logo have a lot of value in tourism marketing, given the fact that many communities use the hub theme, but as a “community unification” tool, Sande says it’s great.

“If a community is proud of itself and displays a unified spirit, that show’s well to visitors,” he says. Businesses might want to use the term or a take-off on the “hub” image in marketing themselves as well, he suggests, adding to the community pride momentum.

Oddly though, a quick search of Redmond-area organizations and businesses in existence today show a single hub-related name and that one has been around for a while – Hub Motel.

-- story by Leslie Pugmire Hole



Event Calendar

Rec district offerings
The Redmond Area Park and Recreation District is offering hiking trips and has partnered with local businesses to offer a variety of other outdoor recreation programs.
Central Oregon and Current Experiences is running whitewater kayak programs, including introduction to whitewater kayaking classes, day camps and a few overnight campouts. Smith Rock climbing guides are offering rock climbing instruction, and Outdoor Quest will teach how to use a GPS and how to survive in the wilderness in an emergency situation. Sessions begin in July and continue all summer. Register now for these and many other recreation programs that are happening at your local park and recreation district. Call 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org for more information.

Sponsored band camp for middle schoolers
Cascade Community School of Music will offer a band camp for middle school students the week of August 23. The camp has been generously underwritten with a grant from the Roundhouse Foundation and tuition for the entire week is only $45. The camp features specialists who can give beginning and intermediate students individualized attention. Contact the Cascade Community School of Music at 541-382-6866 for details, or register on the school’s website at www.ccschoolofmusic.org. The school is located (for the time being) at 2150 N.E. Studio Road in Bend.

WEDNESDAY
July 7
STORY TIME, PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3–5 years; 10:15 a.m.; second story time at 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about financial planning, managing income and spending, tracking expenses and creating a spending plan. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-548-2380.
MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Local rockers Audiolized, food, beer and wine vendors on site; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick talks about her novel “An Absence So Great”; free; 7 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.
“LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; adult themes; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599.

THURSDAY
July 8
STORY TIME, BABY STEPS: Ages 0–18 months; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Mystic River” by Dennis Lehane; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064 or www.dpls.us/calendar.
TEEN PROGRAM, CRAZY CRAFTACULAR: Spend an afternoon being creative and make a wind chime. All materials provided. For grades 6-12; 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
JOINT WORKSHOP: Deschutes County Commission and Redmond City Council meeting, public welcome, 7 a.m., council chambers, 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.;agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
CENTENNIAL: Redmond Centennial Advisory Committee meeting, public welcome 5 p.m., city hall, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
JEAN WELLS ARTIST RECEPTION: Meet Jean Wells-Keenan, the 2010 Quilt Show poster artist, enjoy live music by Katie Cavanaugh, refreshments and more during this popular Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show event; 3-6:30 p.m.; High Desert Gallery, 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6250.
“LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; adult themes; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599.

FRIDAY
July 9
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond talks about her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
“WHO SHOT THE SHERIFF?”: Buckboard Productions presents interactive murder mystery dinner theater; reservations requested; $60; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700.
ORIGINAL AMERICANA MUSIC: Performed by Allan Byer on the restaurant’s patio; 6-9 p.m.; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599.

SATURDAY
July 10
SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; registration required; $15-$45 to race, kids race free, spectators free; 6:15 a.m. half marathon, 7 a.m. 5K and 10K, 7:30 a.m. kids race; Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-388-1860 or www.smithrockrace.com.
CHURCH YARD SALE: Proceeds benefit church missions; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126, Powell Butte; 541-548-3066.
DIRT DIGGERS’ SCRAMBLE: Ninth annual golf tournament hosted by Camp Fire USA Central Oregon; proceeds benefit the programs and services provided by the Camp Fire USA Central Oregon Council; $140 includes 18 holes, cart, continental breakfast and barbecue lunch; 8 a.m. shotgun start, 7 a.m. registration; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-382-4682 or campfirechristine@bendbroadband.com.
FLAPJACK FRENZY: Eat pancakes as a benefit for Teen Challenge; RSVP requested; $5, $3 ages 10 and younger; 8-11 a.m.; Central Oregon Men’s Center, 435 N.E. Burnside Ave., Bend; 541-678-5272.

MONDAY
July 12
AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS: Each Class is eight hours, over two consecutive four-hour days. Call to enroll; AARP member $12, Non-member $14; Class continues July 13, 8 a.m.-noon; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond; 541-548-6325.
REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling fresh produce. Debit cards and Oregon Trail cards accepted; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com.
LET’S FIND NEMO!: One of Disney’s most-loved movies “Finding Nemo” will be shown for everyone to enjoy; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
DURAC: Meeting to discuss plans for urban renewal and identify future projects; 5 p.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave., agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us; 541-504-5000.
LATINO FAMILY NIGHT: Refreshments provided. Spanish speaking staff available; 5-7 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.

TUESDAY
July 13
TODDLER ART: Let your 3-5 year old dabble in art with fingers and toes; $6; 1 p.m.; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, Activity Center, 335 S.E. Jackson St., Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.
FLAVORED OILS, VINEGARS WORKSHOP : Oregon State University Master Food Preserver Carol Nelson and Family and Community Health Instructor Glenda Hyde will help you discover safe preparation, storage and uses of flavored oils and vinegars. Participants can bring a glass bottle and lid that holds a pint or less if they want to take a sample home; 10 a.m.; Class size is limited; $15; register by July 12; OSU Extension Service, 3893 S.W. Airport Way , Redmond; 541-548-6088 or glenda.hyde@oregonstate.edu.
STORY TIME, TODDLIN’ TALES: 18–36 months; 10:15 a.m.; second story time 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
RIVER READERS: A weekly creative program for ages 6-11; 1:30 p.m.; Enjoy stories, games and crafts, all about things wild, wet, and wonderful; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637.

WEDNESDAY
July 14
STORY TIME, PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3–5 years; 10:45 a.m.; Second story time follows at 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
RAPRD: Redmond Area Park and Recreation District board of directors meeting, public welcome, 6:30 a.m., Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way. Agenda at www.raprd.org.
AIRPORT COMMISSION:Redmond Airport Commission, 5:30 p.m., Roberts Field terminal conference room. Agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us
FIRE DISTRICT: Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1, board meeting, public welcome, 7 p.m., Redmond Fire and Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.
REDMOND HISTORICAL COMMISSION MEETING: Meeting to locate and preserve all significant records and artifacts that are of historical importance, public welcome, 2 p.m.; Redmond Museum, 529 S.W. Seventh St., Redmond; 541-504-3038.
SAVING & INVESTING: Learn the importance of saving and investing, including strategies to reduce spending and increase income, in this second in a series class offered by NeighborImpact. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; Somer Hartvigsen;541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.
MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring a performance by Americana act CinderBlue; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com.

THURSDAY
July 15
STORY TIME, BABY STEPS: Ages 0–18 months; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
“HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; noon-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.
TEEN PROGRAM, VIDEO GAMING: Check out what’s new for our Wii and PS2! Bring in your own games if rated E or T. Snacks provided. For grades 6-12; 1-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
BARK-B-QUE DINNER: Barbecue with ribs, burgers, hot dogs, potato salad and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $15, $11 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882.

FRIDAY
July 16
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
SATURDAY
July 17
DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races, including a kids Splash 'N Dash to benefit The Center Foundation; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@freshairsports.com or www.freshairsports.com.
CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: Featuring more than 40 activity booths, jump houses, dance and karate demonstrations, food and more; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; free admission, 50 cents per activity ticket, $20 all-day pass; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-385-7988 or www.saving-grace.org.
PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY LECTURES, THE STARS AND YOU: A discussion about how stars create the essential building blocks of life and how they are distributed throughout the universe. Gain an understanding of the famous “Drake equation” for estimating the likelihood of life elsewhere; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

SUNDAY
July 18
DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@freshairsports.com or www.freshairsports.com.

MONDAY
July 19
REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling fresh produce. Debit cards and Oregon Trail cards accepted; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com.

TUESDAY
July 20
STORY TIME, TODDLIN’ TALES: 18–36 months; Second story time follows at 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
RIVER READERS: A weekly creative program for ages 6-11. Enjoy stories, games and crafts, all about things wild, wet, and wonderful; Second story time follows at 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637.
WIRE WRAPPING/JEWELRY MAKING: Ages 9 and up. Create wire jewelry pieces that will impress friends and family. All levels welcome. Parent must attend for 9-12 age group; $15 ID, $19.50 OD (13 years & up), $25 ID, $35.20 OD (9-12 years); 6-8 p.m.; Britz Beads, 249 N.W. 6th St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

WEDNESDAY
July 21
MUSIC IN ACTION: Rich Glauber is a troubadour/music educator who specializes in creating highly active musical experiences for participants of all ages; Second story time follows at 11:15 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
MUSIC IN THE CANYON: John Shipe Trio; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com.

THURSDAY
July 22
STORY TIME, BABY STEPS: Ages 0–18 months; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050.
CHILDREN’S CONCERT, HORSE CRAZY COWGIRL BAND: Their skilled musicianship will have you stomping and clapping; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

FRIDAY
July 23
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.

SATURDAY
July 24
KIDS’ JAM WITH THE BITTERBRUSH BAND – LIVE!: Children can pick from an array of rhythm instruments and play along with the Bitterbrush Band, performing live Americana music; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.
MINING DAY: Experience the life of a placer miner, stake a claim and pan for gold; $2 panning fee, plus museum admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
ORIGINAL AMERICANA MUSIC : Performed by Allan Byer on the restaurant’s patio; 6-9 p.m.; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599.
BAT TALK AND WALK: Join biologists from the Deschutes National Forest to learn
more about the fascinating bats of Central Oregon. And, outside after sunset, use special acoustic equipment (“bat
detectors”) to record bat calls and identify species; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; Call to reserve your spot; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 ext. 241.