September 30, 2010

Tetherow

Photo and story by Leslie Pugmire Hole

Ever make a promise to yourself that you can’t let go of, despite common sense and every possible reason to excuse yourself?

I was committed to taking a solitary hike, a lovely time somewhere in the back of beyond, an opportunity to contemplate the universe.

And here was my window of opportunity: short on time and long on rain.

Determined to make something happen, I threw a rain slicker in my car and laced up my tall hiking boots, the ones I rarely wear since moving to the dry side of the Cascades.

I headed west from Redmond, bearing a hard right at the Cline Falls exit. My meandering route north, I knew, would take me past some large ranches hugging the Deschutes River and, in a few short miles, lead me to one of the oldest homesteads in area: Tetherow.

The tiny bridge I cross, I knew from my history studies, is the modern equivalent to the ferry crossing operated by Andrew Jackson Tetherow, the early pioneer who built a home next to the river in 1878 – a house that still stands, albeit altered over the years and now shuttered.

I park next to the house; the homestead site and riverfront land is owned by Redmond Park and Recreation District and open to the public.
I contemplate the steady drizzle and sigh; this short hike will be better than nothing.

In actuality, it is a lot better than nothing. The day is warm and the rain tolerable. While I’m hardly deep into the wild – palatial houses line the rimrock above the river – the trail is deserted and I am free with my thoughts.

I realize then that it’s been a while since I’ve hike by myself and I’m reminded how much I enjoy it. I find myself observing minute things I might have missed had I been trudging along with a companion, happily chatting.

The trail, which leads upriver from the farm house, is obviously heavily used during better weather. I find evidence of humans in unlikely places: a single child’s shoe next to the trail and, later, a man’s glove. There’s an abandoned camp chair and jury-rigged fencing long abandoned.

Despite the obvious presence of people along this trail on this day I find plenty of wildlife, or at least evidence of it: a deer slips through the brush ahead of me, a mallard bobs in the rain-swollen river and signs of busy beaver are rampant among the trees.

As I walk it seems hard to believe the river needed a ford here, it is so narrow. But farther up I come upon patches of smooth rock right near the trail and pockets of water-loving plants: cattail, wild iris, buttercups. The river, it is plain, often stretches its edges beyond what I see today and in Tetherow’s day, before we began tapping the Deschutes, it was likely that wide more often than not.

From previous hikes along this stretch of the river I recall that I’ll eventually bump up against private land and must turn back; I keep an eye out for fencing or signs but see neither.

After a mile or two (forgot my pedometer at home in my pique over the weather) the trail seems to dissolve into rocks, trees and undergrowth. There’s no sign warning off trespassers but I turn around anyway, taking the lack of easy trail as a sign.

It’s about time anyway. My boots are caked in mud, my jeans are wet to my thighs and while not soaked to the skin as I might have been after a hike west of the Cascades, I’m thoroughly damp, like a well-squeezed sponge.

On the walk back I pause at the brook that crosses the trail, watching it race down the hill on its way to the Deschutes. I’m startled to see that the shrubbery around the creek is wild blackberries, a sight I seldom see on this dry side of the state.

I pick a few berries and pop them in my mouth as I head for the car and for a moment I’m transported to past hikes in the foothills of Mt. Hood or the lush coastal rainforests in northwest Oregon.
This high desert hike has been full of surprises.






September 28, 2010

Event calendar

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 29
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.
BLOOD DRIVE: Crooked River Ranch Fire Station, 6971 S.W. Shad Rd.;1-5:45 p.m.; 1-800-GIVE-LIFE for appointment.

THURSDAY
Sept. 30
TEEN THURSDAYS, DAY OF THE DEAD FIESTA: Redmond Teen Thursdays: Decorate sugar skulls and learn about the Day of the Dead celebration. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sarahlee Lawrence reads from her book “River House”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

FRIDAY
Oct. 1
FLEA MARKET: Jewelry, dolls, clothing, tools, and lots more, lunch available in the kitchen, benefits Boys and Girls Club; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Terrebonne Grange Hall, 11th St., Terrebonne; 541-420-3319.
FLU SHOTS: Flu shots for ages 9 and above, $25, portion of proceeds benefit Healthy Beginnings, a nonprofit that provides free developmental screenings for children; 6 p.m.; Big R Store, 3141 S. Highway 97; some insurance accepted; 541-389-7211.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
CORN MAZE: Central Oregon Pumpkin Company’s 8-acre corn maze opens, 3-7 p.m.; $7.50 adults, $5.50 kids; “Jurassic Ranch” is this year’s theme; 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terre bonne; www.pumpkinco.org.

SATURDAY
Oct. 2
FLEA MARKET: Jewelry, dolls, clothing, tools, and lots more, lunch available in the kitchen, benefits Boys and Girls Club; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Terrebonne Grange Hall, 11th St., Terrebonne; 541-420-3319.
BUDDY WALK: Walk to promote awareness of Down syndrome; event includes live entertainment, face painting, a clown, a bounce house and more; $5 per person, $20 per family in advance; $10 per person, $25 family at the event; 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. walk; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-548-8559 or www.codsn.org.
HARVEST FESTIVAL: Press apples, grind corn, build a log cabin, meet homesteaders and more; $2, $10 per family, free ages 2 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
FALL FUN: Central Oregon Pumpkin Company’s corn maze, pumpkin patch, petting zoo and other activities open 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; barnyard golf, train rides and hay fort; 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terre bonne; www.pumpkinco.org.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet reads from his book “The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.
CONCERT: Singer/songwriter Jason Schweitzer performs; free; 7 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 S.W. 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883.
DINNER & DANCE: dinner reservations recommended, arrive by 6 p.m. or pay in advance to guarantee reservation, stay and dance to the music of 3 Quarter Short. No reservations necessary for the dance; $10 prime rib dinner, dance is $4 for members and $6 for non-members; Oct. 2, 5:30 p.m. dinner, 7 to 11 p.m. dance; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108,541-923-8591.

MONDAY
Oct. 4
REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 6, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506 ext. 109.

TUESDAY
Oct. 5
BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY: At Williamson Hall, “Beginning Genealogy,” followed by “Research Methods” at 11:45 a.m., public welcome; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978 or541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meeting; public welcome; 6:45 a.m.; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PLANNING: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission meeting; public welcome; 7 p.m.; 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

WEDNESDAY
Oct. 6
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.
GENERAL FEDERATION OF WOMEN’S CLUB: Redmond Fire Chief Tim Moor will speak, if interested in attending; contact Membership Chairman Diane Bodden at 541-923-7374; 6 p.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond; 541-504-5000.

SATURDAY
Oct. 9
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper talks about her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder, Legacy of the Sheepshooters”; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.
KIWANIS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring an Oktoberfest feast, live music and an auction; proceeds from the auction benefit the Kiwanis Doernbecher Children’s Cancer Program; $30, $50 per couple; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-350-6877 or www.redmondkiwanis.org.

Legal help for seniors
Central Oregon Council on Aging and the Legal Aid Services of Oregon are working together to offer legal services to low-income older adults living in Central Oregon. These services are provided to adults 60 years and older with preference to those in greatest social and economic need, with particular attention to low income, minority and frail individuals.
The next Legal Assistance sessions will be held on Thursday, Oct. 7, from 8 to 11 a.m. with attorney Steve Bryant at the Redmond Senior Center, located at 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave. To schedule an appointment and to get more information, call COCOA Case Manager Robby Miller at 541-548-1086.
The following list of priority services will be offered to seniors: income maintenance, health care, food and nutrition, and housing and utilities. Additional services may include correspondence, negotiations and preparation of legal documents. Appointments are scheduled for one half hour only. Criminal cases, simple wills, fee generating cases or conflicts of interest cannot be handled through this program.

Commissary coming to Redmond
National Guard and Reserve members, military retirees, active-duty military service members, and dependents are invited to the Commissary On-site Sale hosted by the Smokey Point Commissary.
The sale will be held at the Deschutes Fairgrounds and Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, in Redmond on Oct. 1 and 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 3 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sale items may include paper products, soap and cleaning products, canned goods, sodas, sport drinks, water, laundry detergents, and a variety of other products at savings of 30 percent or more.
Commissaries operated by the Defense Commissary Agency provide groceries at cost to military personnel, retirees and their families at U.S. military installations around the world. Customers must present an appropriate Department of Defense ID card that authorizes commissary privileges in order to shop. Cash, checks, debit cards and credit cards are accepted for payment. The use of coupons is highly encouraged.
For more information, contact Devona Johnson at 425-304-3412 or Leva Fairley at 425-304-3414, or visit commissaries.com.

Senior safe driving class
AARP Driver Safety Classes will be offered at the Redmond Senior Center on Oct. 11 and 12 and Nov. 8 and 9, from 8 a.m. to noon. Each class is eight total hours, over two consecutive four-hour days.
AARP Driver Safety Classes are a nationwide, DMV accredited, defensive driver program, focusing on driving safely within current DMV laws, recognizing and compensating for natural occurring, age-related changes. Those who complete the course qualify for an insurance discount. The cost for AARP members is $12, nonmembers are $14. To enroll, call 541-548-6325.

COCC hosts art show
Central Oregon Community College Rotunda Gallery and the High Desert Art League present “High Desert Palette,” a fine art exhibition from 4 to 7 p.m. Oct. 1 through Nov. 30. An opening reception will be held in the Rotunda Gallery just inside the entrance to the COCC Barber Library on Thursday, Oct. 7.
For information about the High Desert Art League, visit their website at www.highdesertartleague.com.
In advance of college events, persons needing accommodation or transportation because of a physical or mobility disability should contact Joe Viola at 541-383-7775. For accommodation because of another disability such as hearing impairment, contact Anne Walker at 541-383-7743.

Be a backpack explorer
The Backpack Explorers program at the High Desert Museum allows ages 3 and 4 to engage their senses on an adventure created just for them and their parents. Meet animals close up, observe nature, and create art on a backpack journey throughout the Museum. Take home activities based on your discoveries. Beginning Oct. 4, new themes are offered each week from 9 to 10 a.m. most Mondays and Tuesdays through Nov. 30. Members $10, non-members $15. For more information visit www.high
desertmuseum.org.

What's the buzz? Urban beekeeping

Leslie Pugmire Hole/Spokesman staff

Backyard chickens in the city? Forget about it.

That was so 2009. The newest rural-meets-town trend is bees.

“I just think they’re fascinating,” says Gary Wing, a novice beekeeper who, with other apiary owners, recently approached the city of Redmond to ask for reconsideration of an ordinance banning beekeeping within city limits.

Wing, who lives just outside the northwest Redmond city limits, started his hive last spring and has enjoyed watching its impact on his 20-acre parcel of pasture, flowers, vegetables and fruit trees.

“I’ve always been intrigued by beekeeping but my wife was against it for a long time,” says Wing. “Now my son, who lives in Eugene, says he wants to start a hive.” The laden fruit trees and benign presence of the bees eventually won over even Barb Wing, who calls her husband’s project “interesting.”

The beekeepers’ request was sent to the Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission for consideration. After discussion and research, the commission drafted a proposed ordinance that would allow beekeeping within the city, with conditions to address safety and possible nuisances. The code change will require public hearings and approval by the planning commission and city council before it is official.

According to Community Development Director Heather Richards, the trend towards urban beekeeping, as it affects municipalities, is part of a larger push for sustainability.

“We always ask how (in urban planning) we can improve public health and access to local food is one of those ways,” said Richards. “We try to walk through these requests and mitigate so we can allow what people want while minimizing any negative impacts to neighbors.”

Fear from people living in proximity to apiaries is the major hurdle beekeepers face, according to John Connelly, information officer with the Central Oregon Beekeeping Association.

“What usually happens is somebody will decide they want a honeybee hive on their property and people see that and get nervous,” he said. “To them a bee is a hornet is a yellowjacket; they have stingers and its hurts.”

What most people don’t realize, said Connelly, is the fact that wild honeybees are everywhere around them, in hollow trees and abandoned structures, and they typically are very gentle in behavior.

“So neighbors might see a domesticated hive, call the city and say 'There’s a guy here with a hive; is that allowed?’ City goes through its ordinances, sees no mention and rather than get more information they draft an ordinance and the poor guy gets a knock on the door.”

Connelly, who has been keeping bees since childhood, has been helping the city of Bend rework its ordinance regarding beekeeping, which is expected to be approved soon.

“The city of Redmond has been very interested and very appreciative of the information I’ve given them,” he said. The organization has about 45 members and Connelly said he is aware of even more beekeepers in Central Oregon who are not members.

“Beekeepers come from every walk of life but there isn’t a flood of people interested in this,” he said. “There’s a lot of time and some expense involved so we’re not going to see a hive on every corner.”

The importance of backyard beekeeping, outside its rewards to the average hobbyist, cannot be dismissed, said Connelly. With Colony Collapse Disorder decimating commercial apiaries everywhere, scientists hope a strong cadre of small-hive beekeepers will reinvigorate the species.

“One-third of everything we eat depends on bees for pollination,” he said. “We have to increase the number of hives or face food supply shortages.”

The code revisions being considered by the city of Redmond would allow one hive per 5,000 square feet of lot, with a maximum of eight. It also requires hive owners to have the area surrounded by fence or dense vegetation, provide a water source and maintain the hive to avoid overcrowding.

The main reason for the flyway barrier (fencing or shrubs), said Connelly, is to mollify worried neighbors. When bees leave a hive they fly straight out, with a gradual elevation gain. In urban neighborhoods a six-foot fence pushes the bees higher sooner, so they’ll be well above any people before leaving the beekeeper’s property.

“Bees are wild creatures and have instinctual habits,” said Connelly, “We just try to understand and manage that behavior.”

Planning Commissioner Amy Jo Bellew, during discussion of code language, was even more succinct.

“Maybe we should make sure bees read the code,” she said, acknowledging that most beekeeping rules were for the sake of neighbors.

Gary Wing doesn’t have any close neighbors to consider but he understands why people worry.

“Nobody likes getting stung,” he said. Even he, who has no fear of bees, was stung when handling his hive soon after he started it.

“When you’ve got a hive open and you’re looking at thousands of bees crawling around, it can be impressive. One flew close to my head and (before I realized what I was doing) I swatted at it. It was my own fault.”

If you go

What: Beekeeping public hearing

When: 7 p.m., Oct. 5

Where: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission, 716 SW Evergreen Ave.

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Obituaries

Ali D. Reinhart, of Redmond
July 27, 1947 - Sept. 19, 2010
Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel
541-548-3219; www.redmondmemorial.com
Celebration of Life was held Sept. 25, 2010
at the Masonic Center, Redmond.
Contributions may be made to a local charity.

Caroline Elizabeth Ludecker, of Redmond
Nov. 29, 1929 - Sept. 22, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
No services per family request
Contributions may be made to: Pioneer Hospice, Ochoco Humane Society, Campus Crusades for Christ.

Mary Joan Murray, of Redmond
Oct. 3, 1925 - Sept. 16, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
No services are planned at this time.

Dorothy "Dottie" Lea Nelson
August 3, 1938 - Sept. 12, 2010
Dorothy "Dottie" Lea Nelson, of Redmond, passed on September 12, 2010, at the age of 72. She was born on August 3, 1938, in Silverton, Oregon, to William and Edna Marian Anderson, as one of nine children.
A lifelong Oregonian, she loved the outdoors and family. She blended these by having a big garden and canning enough to give to her family and extended family, salsa, pickled cucumbers and beans, to name a few. Dottie was a gracious hostess and never knew a stranger, welcoming all to her home.
Dottie was a great sports fan; she once travelled to Reno to bowl with a team made up of herself and her four sisters.
Dottie will be remember and missed by her sons, Jerry Miller, Ben Nelson and Merle Nelson; and daughters, Patty Braunstein, Teresa Robinson, Toni and Sherry Krog; her sisters, Barbara Bullock, Joan Beckner, Marylou Keeler and Rosie Schlewitz; and brother, Ken Anderson and many, many grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her devoted husband and best friend, Merle "Hap" Nelson; and brothers, Bill, Jim and Pat Anderson.
A Celebration of Life service will be held at 3:00 pm, Sat., Oct. 2, at Redmond Masonic Lodge, 627 7th St., Redmond.

September 21, 2010

Redmond High School Hall of Famer drew life lessons from football

Jed and Dan Weaver

Perseverance and a first-class work ethic are what separated offensive lineman Dan Weaver from the pack.
A 1998 graduate of Redmond High School, Weaver went on to play center on the University of Oregon football team, where he won the Ed Moshofsky Award his junior and senior seasons as the Duck's most outstanding offensive lineman.
A three-sport athlete at RHS, he will be inducted into its Hall of Fame Sept. 25.
Weaver's honors are legion. He was a first-team Pac 10 center in the Sporting News all-conference tally and a second-team offensive lineman in the coaches' poll his junior year. (He was the top vote-getting center). As a senior he was an honorable mention. He was on the Pac 10 and NCAA Western Region all-academic teams three years with a 3.21 GPA in accounting.
Weaver also earned plenty of honors at Redmond High School. As a senior coaches voted him to the first-team Intermountain Conference as a center and linebacker in football. He was an honorable mention basketball player and a first-team pitcher and first baseman.
But as a 235-pound offensive lineman he was a bit small for major college football.
"He was a very intelligent kid. I've always contended that the great equalizer in athletics is a brain," said his high school line coach Kurt Davis. "He understood scheme and what we had to do. He was definitely the leader of that unit, and really incredibly intelligent."
As a RHS student, Weaver was smart enough to know he needed some work, and he knew what he wanted. Portland State, Harvard and Yale had shown some interest, but Weaver wanted to play Division One football.
"I figured my best shot was playing offensive line at the University of Oregon," he said. "I just wanted to go there and play with the big boys in the big pond."
After graduation he worked at P.C.C. Schlosser in Redmond, where he had to lift metal pieces. He also lifted weights and helped coach the freshman line at Redmond High School that year.
The next year he enrolled part time at Lane Community College so as not to use any eligibility, and continued to lift weights. He transferred to Oregon winter term and went to spring practice weighing 280 pounds.
He needed to prove himself enough to get one of the limited number of walk on spots.
"I think I naturally grew into my body," said Weaver. According to Davis, Weaver was a year younger than his cohorts.
One of the things in Weaver's favor was his older brother Jed, who walked on to play tight end at Oregon and went on to an NFL career. Jed had shown the ability and the work ethic to be successful and Dan feels Jed opened the door for him.
"He really opened up the possibility for me to do that," Dan said.
"Both of those kids I have a tremendous respect for," said Davis. "Through hard work and perseverance they ended up with a scholarship."
Weaver was at the University of Oregon at an opportune time. He first made the team as a snapper for field goals and points-after, but soon won the starting center position. Oregon beat Texas in the Holiday Bowl in 2000, then in 2001, he notes, he was the highly photographed posterior in front of Heisman Trophy candidate quarterback Joey Harrington. Oregon beat Colorado in the Fiesta Bowl that year, and finished the season second in the nation. Oregon routed the Buffs that day, scoring 31 unanswered points.
"We were just firing on all cylinders," he said. "All the hard work came to fruition. It was pretty cool." Fans to this day grouse about being over-looked for the national championship that year but Weaver notes the team lost to Stanford 49-42 after leading by two touchdowns in the fourth quarter earlier that season. A win likely would have put them in the National Championship game.
"We really couldn't blame too many other people," he said.
Oregon played in the Seattle Bowl and the Sun Bowl in his final two years. In all he had 37 starts at Oregon.
Weaver was not drafted out of college and didn't have a professional football career. He did sign a mini-camp deal with the Denver Broncos where he played briefly during camp with his brother Jed for the first time. They had never before been on the field together in any competitive sport. The New York Giants also flew him in for a work-out at the Meadowlands.
A lifelong Giants fan, it was a dream come true for Weaver. His agent told him that teams regarded him as an overachieving white guy, a comment he takes as a complement.
"I'd rather be an overachiever than an underachiever," he said.
Weaver is now a corporate accounting manager for Hampton Affiliates in Portland. He married his high school sweetheart Sammie Hoffman (class of '99) and they had their first child, Owen, June 10. Weaver said his son is going to be a big guy.
Weaver could have chosen to be a baseball player after high school, after all his cousins Jeff (L.A. Dodgers) and Jared ( Anaheim Angels) Weaver play in the major leagues, but Weaver likes football and he found it most rewarding.
"I had a really good college coach who drove home that football isn't for life and that you can take a lot of the lessons home," he said noting that football teaches work ethic, accountability, team goals among many other things. "That helps you in life and it helps if you can transition all those things you learn on the football field into your life. That's what I've always tried to take from football and sports."

-- story by Gary Newman

Redmond High School will celebrate the induction of five new members in its hall of fame Sept. 25. This year's inductees include former University of Oregon lineman Dan Weaver, all-American wrestler Dick Knorr, golf pro and supporter of Redmond schools, Bruce Wattenburger; former Redmond athletic director Dick Branaugh and civics teacher and mock trial coach Rod Hanson. Inductees will be introduced at halftime of the Redmond Summit football game. The event includes a golf tournament at Juniper Golf Club Sept. 25 and an induction dinner at Juniper Golf Club following the tournament. Tickets for the dinner are $25. For more information or for tickets contact the Redmond High School Athletic department at 541-923-4806.

Event Calendar

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 22
OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.
SCHOOL BOARD: Redmond School Board meeting; public welcome; 5:30 p.m.; Tumalo Community School; 19835 Second Street, Tumalo; agenda at www.redmond.k12.or.us.
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

THURSDAY
Sept. 23
TEEN THURSDAYS: The library is your space! Come hang out, listen to music, games and drawing supplies available. Free snacks. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1063, mercedesh@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Redmond Development Commission meeting, public welcome; 3:30 p.m.; 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.

FRIDAY
Sept. 24
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
HARVEST MOON FARE: Eight local farmers pair with eight chefs to create a dinner, with entertainment, a live auction and more; registration required; $25; 6:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-548-2380, ext. 144 or www.neighborimpact.org.

SATURDAY
Sept. 25
REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more. All proceeds will be donated to the Redmond Friends of K9 program; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-480-4495.
5K FUN RUN/WALK: Event features a 5K fun run/walk, a petting zoo, play area, live music, food and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon; $15, $10 ages 12-17, free ages 11 and younger; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. race; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-2611 or www.ofco.org.
SHOW & SHINE: Car show with a barbecue, local vendors and raffle; free, $5 for meal; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126, Powell Butte; 541-548-3066.
AUCTION FUNDRAISER: Live and silent auctions, with live music by NTT and hors d’oeuvres; registration requested; proceeds benefit the City Care Clinic; $45; 6-9 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-410-4958, terrivisser@yahoo.com or http://thecitycareclinic.org.
LIVE MUSIC: Beautiful Failure performs soulful indie rock; free; 7 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 SW 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883.
I HEART CENTRAL OREGON CELEBRATION: Celebrate the day of service with inspirational speaker Nick Vujicic and a performance by Elliot; free with advance ticket, $10 at the door; 7-9 p.m., doors open 6:20 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-728-3134, elisa@theheartcampaign.com or http://theheartcampaign.com.
SHOT CLINIC: Central Oregon Shots for Tots and Teens immunization clinic; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Hartman RHS campus, 2105 W. Antler Ave.; no appointments necessary; bring records; sponsored by Deschutes County Rotary and Deschutes Health Department and Immunization Coalition; 541-322-7400.

SUNDAY
Sept. 26
REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: ABBA-Mania performs ABBA hits, with costume changes and choreography; $35, $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org.
OREGON ARTS COMMISSION OPEN FORUMS: Information about the strategic plan for the arts in Oregon; 3:30-5 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 503-986-0082 or kat.bell@state.or.us.

TUESDAY
Sept. 28
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meetings, public welcome; 6:45 a.m. and 7 p.m.; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
HUMAN TRAFFICKING 101: Nita Belles from Oregonians against the Trafficking of Humans (OATH) will be speaking; free; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-382-4401.

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 29
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

THURSDAY
Sept. 30
TEEN THURSDAYS, DAY OF THE DEAD FIESTA: Redmond Teen Thursdays: Decorate sugar skulls and learn about the Day of the Dead celebration. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.

FRIDAY
Oct. 1
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend.

SATURDAY
Oct. 2
BUDDY WALK: Walk to promote awareness of Down syndrome; event includes live entertainment, face painting, a clown, a bounce house and more; $5 per person, $20 per family in advance; $10 per person, $25 family at the event; 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. walk; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-548-8559 or www.codsn.org.
CONCERT: Singer/songwriter Jason Schweitzer performs; free; 7 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 S.W. 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883.

MONDAY
Oct. 4
REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 6, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506 ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY
Oct. 6
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

Redmond Area Park and Rec District
Sports camps, white water rafting, quilting, arts and crafts are all being offered this fall.
Adventure Quest has been extended this year to include Sage along with Vern Patrick and Tom McCall elementary schools. Adventure Quest is for kindergarten to fifth grade. Students can begin and finish their day at Adventure Quest and stay the entire day on non-school days, including teacher in-service days. Each week will have a theme, and there will be homework time with staff to assist the children.
Pool maintenance and upgrades are well under way at the Cascade Swim Center and doors will open Sept. 27 with classes to fit every age. Aqua Kids, Waterbabies, an adult stroke clinic, and youth swim lessons are some of the offerings. Sign up for any of these programs by calling 541-548-7275 or visit www.raprd.org for more information.

Kiwanis Oktoberfest
The Kiwanis Doernbecher Children’s Cancer Program has been chosen as the designated benefactor of the annual Redmond Kiwanis Oktoberfest and auction Saturday, Oct. 9, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Eagle Crest Convention Center.
Admission to the event is $30 per person or $50 per couple, and corporate tables for 8 are available for $250. Admission price includes a traditional Oktoberfest feast including brats, roast pork and sauerkraut, German potato salad, pretzels, a glass of beer or wine, and music by the Little Bohemian Band from Albany.
Tickets are available at the Redmond Chamber of Commerce, from the Bend Radio Group, from Kiwanis members or online with PayPal at www.RedmondKiwanis.org.
Beer will be provided by four local microbreweries — Cascade Lakes, Boneyard, Ninkasi, and Three Creeks. A special portion of the auction will be desserts provided and prepared by local bakeries and vendors.
This is the 38th annual Kiwanis Auction and the club’s major fundraiser for its youth projects. Last year, it raised more than $10,000. The auction began in the early 1970s as a fundraiser for the Cascade Swim Center which was completed in 1979.
For more information, contact Jared Larkin at 541-350-6877.

Solar Home Tour
Now in its 10th year, the Central Oregon Green and Solar Home Tour will showcase many of Central Oregon’s greenest and most sustainable homes on Oct. 2.
The homes on the tour will incorporate significant use of solar and other renewable energies, new and reclaimed green building materials, energy efficiency maximization and water conservation technologies. This year’s tour is a chance for the community to explore green homes firsthand and talk directly to the builders and homeowners. Attendees will learn how the latest green building technologies are installed and function from both the experts and the users.
The tour will kick off with a keynote speech by Matt Briggs. A renowned documentary filmmaker, Briggs made his directorial debut with “Deep Green.” Shot in nine countries during the last three years, the film is based on six years of intensive environmental research in which Briggs spoke to leading authorities, attended scores of conferences, and studied hundreds of books and thousands of articles. Briggs has embarked on two separate global treks that gave him a traveler’s perspective on different cultures and sustainable practices in 50 countries.
This free tour will begin at Wille Hall in the Central Oregon Community College Campus Center at 2600 N.W. College Way, in Bend. The keynote speaker will begin at 9 a.m., doors open at 8:30 a.m. The homes on the tour will be open for viewing from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For an additional $10 fee, join a guided bus tour to see the homes and enjoy a box lunch along the way. Space is limited, so arrive early to sign up to ride the bus. There are also two continuing education credits available for architecture professionals through AIA. For more information on tickets, times and the homes on the tour, visit http://greenandsolarhometour.com.

Nature of Words
Tickets are available for online purchase for The Nature of Words’ annual literary festival, scheduled for Nov. 3-7. Patrons can visit www.thenatureofwords.org to buy tickets for guest author readings, workshops and the author dinner with keynote speaker Sam Waterston. In addition, tickets can be reserved for free events, which include the Rising Star Creative Writing Competition Awards, sponsored by the University of Oregon, and the Open Mic featuring Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen. Reading tickets are also available at the Tower Theatre in Bend, 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. Students with valid ID can obtain free reading tickets in advance at the Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., in Bend.
By popular demand, an editor with a major publisher has been added to the workshop options. Gary Fisketjon is editor-at-large and vice-president at Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. His career spans 30 years and has included work with numerous acclaimed authors, including 2010 guest author Kent Haruf. Fisketjon will conduct a joint workshop with Haruf about how a writer and editor work together and the stages of a book from purchase to promotion. In his solo workshop, Fisketjon will explain what he does as an editor, from acquisition through the entire process. Both workshops will allow ample time for questions.
Guest authors for the 2010 festival are Jimmy Santiago Baca, Michael Dickman, Kent Haruf, Hillary Jordan, Anne Lamott, Barry Lopez, Paulann Petersen, Brian Turner and David Whyte.

Obituaries

Karl Lloyd Nance, of Terrebonne, Oregon
July 17, 1968 - Sept. 17, 2010

Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
A service of remembrance will be held at 11 a.m., Sept. 22, at Prineville Missionary Baptist Church, Madras Hwy and Riverland Loop, Prineville, OR
A Celebration of Life and Military Service will be held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 25, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 NE Butler Market Rd., Bend, OR.
Contributions may be made to Hospice of Redmond, 732 SW 32nd, Redmond, OR.

Duane Asle Haugen, of Redmond
Nov. 25, 1952 - Aug. 25, 2010
Arrangements: Attrell's Newberg Funeral Chapel
503-538-2191
Services were held September 19 at Redmond Community Church, Redmond, Oregon. He was buried in Valley-View Cemetery in Newberg, Oregon.

Joy Yvonne (Smith) Gobble, of Klamath Falls
Dec. 25, 1936 - Aug. 31, 2010
Arrangements: O’Hair & Riggs Funeral Chapel
541-884-3456; www.ohairandriggs.com
A memorial service was held at the Klamath Falls Senior Center. She was laid to rest in the Redmond Memorial Cemetery with her parents.

Jerelyn Ann Osborn, of Madras
Sept. 5, 1943 - Sept. 14, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9495; www.autumnfunerals.net
A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 25, United Methodist Church, 49 NE 12th St., Madras.

Rita L. Spurgeon, of Madras
April 12, 1949 - Sept. 13, 2010
Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend
541-382-0903; www.bairdmortuaries.com
As per the decedent's request, no services are planned.

Dorothy Lea Nelson, of Redmond
Aug. 3, 1938 - Sept. 12, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Satruday, Oct. 2, Redmond Masonic Lodge, 627 7th St.

Clara Gladys Borden, of Redmond
July 19, 1943 - Sept. 7, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
Private family services to be held at a later date.

Phyllis Meyer Howard
February 18, 1932 - Sept. 8, 2010
Phyllis Gene Meyer Howard, age 78, passed away on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010. Born in Bellevue, Ohio, February 18, 1932, and resided until 1964, when she moved to Fremont, Ohio until 1969. While in Fremont, she worked for Croghan National Bank, in the position of head secretary. Phyllis was involved in the Congregational Church of Christ, holding several positions within the membership hierarchy. In fall of 1969, she moved the family to Salem, Oregon, taking a head secretarial position with Ladd & Bush US National Bank of Oregon. She resided in Salem for approximately 3 1/2 years before moving to Redmond, and taking the position of personal administrative assistant to Sam Johnson. In 1974, she married Wallace Ray Howard, and has lived lived in the Redmond/Crooked River Ranch area since.
Her activities while in Redmond have included many hours of volunteerism and awards with various charitable organizations. She has been involved with the national sorority, Beta Sigma Phi, local chapter Preceptor Alpha Omega, since Nov. of 1975, being a Past President and a recipient of the Silver Circle, and Order of the Rose awards. Phyllis and husband, Wally, were heavily involved with the Elks organization, with both of them serving in a multitude of positions, for Phyllis including a Lady Elk and past secretary. She later became a member of the Women of the Moose in 2001, providing many items for auctions which supported Mooseheart, Moosehaven Neighbor Impact, and other Moose organizational philanthropic efforts. She was active in Sunshine Child, Giving Tree, as well as many other community drives. Phyllis’ hours of volunteering numbered in the thousands.
Phyllis’ hobbies included sewing and crafts, often making and providing beautiful scarves for those in need within the community. She collected stuffed bears, of all kinds, with a collection that numbers in the hundreds.
Phyllis was preceded in death by husband, Wally, in April of this year. She was a member of a large family in Ohio, being the eighth of 10 children, born of Joseph and Florence Hoy Meyer. She is survived by sisters, Shirley Cook (Albuquerque, NM), Vivian Jett (Clyde, OH), Doris Ovall (Oregon, OH), and Dorothy Reidy (Norwalk, OH). Surviving children are: Alan G. Stephenson and wife, Beth (Andover, KS), Bruce D. Stephenson (Redmond, OR), and Robert Mark Stephenson and wife, Pam (Paige, AZ). Grandchildren are: Craig Alan Stephenson and wife, Snowanna (Salem, OR), Matthew Kyle Stephenson and wife, Paula (Norfolk, VA), and Bradley Adam Stephenson and wife, Alisa (Eugene, OR), plus four great-grandchildren. From such a large family, she also has 100-plus nieces and nephews who loved her greatly.
Memorial services were held Friday, Sept. 17, 2010, at Redmond Memorial Chapel. In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation may be sent to: Casey Eye Institute, PO Box 189, Salem, OR 97308-0189 or Mooseheart through the local Moose lodge.

Danny Lynn Cagle
Feb. 26, 1948- Sept. 15, 2010
OLD FORT, NC ~ Danny Lynn Cagle, Sr., 62, of Old Fort, NC, passed away unexpectedly Wednesday, September 15, 2010, at his home.
He was born February 26, 1948, in Haywood County, NC, to the late A.Z. and Ruth Burress Cagle.
He was also preceded in death by his sister, Emma Jean Cagle Warlick Tate and son, Fred Edwards.
He retired as a supervisor with Terminix. He was a faithful member of the Black Mountain Moose Lodge #2220, Redmond, Oregon Lodge #323 and Waynesville, NC Lodge #1733; the Elks Lodge and Black Mountain Masonic Lodge #669.
He enjoyed traveling, hunting, and camping, but most of all, he enjoyed spending time with his family.
He is survived by his wife, Gail Cloer Cagle; one daughter, Kathy Cagle Searcy and husband Bobby, of Waynesville, NC; two sons, Danny Lynn Cagle Jr. and wife Staci of Waynesville, and Landon Carl Cloer of Old Fort; two brothers, Doug Burress and wife, Cindy, of Terrebonne, Oregon and Johnny Cagle and wife, Myra, of Candler, NC; four grandchildren, two great grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held Saturday from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Allens Creek Baptist Church, 549 Allens Creek Road, Waynesville. Graveside services was held Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at Rocky Branch Cemetery in Waynesville.
Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA, 23058.
Groce Funeral Home, 856 Tunnel Road, Asheville, NC is in charge of arrangements.
The memorial register is available at "Obituaries" at www.grocefuneralhome.com.

Marilyn Gunsul
July 15, 1931 - Sept. 11, 2010
Marilyn Gunsul, 79, died peacefully September 11, at 7:39 a.m. She was home at Eagle Crest, OR, surrounded by her entire family. Marilyn, whose maiden name was Thompson, graduated from West Seattle High School and attended Washington State University where she met her husband. Along with raising four children, during her life Marilyn was active with the League of Women Voters, followed by a four-year term on the Portland Metropolitan Area Local Government Boundary Commission during the inception of Oregon’s Land Conservation and Development Laws (LCDC) in 1973. She then served for 12 years as one of the original Rape Victim Advocates for the Multnomah County Justice System. Marilyn was an avid and successful racing sailor out of Portland Yacht Club, a member of the Multnomah Athletic Club and she loved the game of golf. Even as dementia took its toll in later years, she maintained her ebullient, ironic sense of humor. She is survived by her architect husband of 60 years, Brooks Gunsul, children, Robin Reese of Taos, NM; Karen Gunsul of Seattle, WA; David Gunsul of Portland, OR; and Jana Gunsul/ Welschmeyer of Niles, CA; along with seven wonderful grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
Memorial contributions in Marilyn’s name would be welcome at the Redmond Sisters Hospice, 877-244-0858; www.RedmondHospice.org
Autumn Funerals Redmond is in charge of arrangements. 541-504-9485.

September 17, 2010

Royal Rockchuck Society of Redmond


Don't miss your chance to get on the ground floor of something big! Become a charter member of the Royal Rockchuck Society of Redmond, an organization dedicated to the elevation of the Yellow-bellied Marmot in the Redmond community.

Any donation will benefit a fund to purchase rockchuck-themed art for Redmond and guarantee publication of the new member's name in the Spokesman. See examples of our new Royal Rockchuck Society of Redmond t-shirts at the Harvest Festival this weekend in Centennial Park.
Purchase of a shirt for $19.10 entitles the buyer to charter membership in the Society (and a certificate of membership) and publication of their membership.

Harvest Celebration


Pray for sunshine! Weather looks so-so for this weekend's Harvest Celebration but we'll be there anyway, ringing out the Centennial year in style. Look for the Spokesman booth at Centennial Park, we'll displaying items from the Redmond Museum and offering chances to win a commemorative tote bag or Redmond history book.

September 15, 2010

This week's Flashback



Lone Pine School, 1976
Grades 5-8

Recognize anyone?


Event calendar

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 15
HISTORY: Redmond Historical Commission meeting, public welcome, 2 p.m.; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The grand finale of the summer concert series features a performance by Larry and His Flask, with Adventure Galley; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com.
TEEN PROGRAM: Redmond SPARK! Book Club Monthly Meeting (meets the third Wednesday of each month). Share awesome books with friends. New members always welcome. For grades 6-8; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1063, mercedesh@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org.

THURSDAY
Sept. 16
RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626.
TEEN THURSDAYS, GAME DAY: Play Wii, Guitar Hero, Rock Band and more! Bring in your own games if rated E or T. Snacks provided. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.
OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY PUBLIC MEETING: Requesting citizen input on developing a plan to lower costs, increase access and improve the quality of health care; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend.
CRR FIRE: Crooked River Ranch Rural Fire Protection District Board meeting, 7 p.m.; CRR Fire Station; public meeting workshop begins at 6:30 p.m.; agenda includes presentation of the 2009-2010 audit.

FRIDAY
Sept. 17
OWL PROWLS: Take a walk with a naturalist at dusk to explore and see the different nocturnal creatures that live in Sunriver; adults $4, Children ages 2-12 $2, SNCO members are free; Sept. 17, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., pre-register by 3:30 p.m. day of walk; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road, Sunriver; 541-593-4394.
RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See Sept. 16 for details.
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Debra Gwartney talks about her book “Live Through This”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

SATURDAY
Sept. 18
COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Breakfast accompanied by live music from Lindy Gravelle and a military keynote speaker; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Council on Aging RSVP program; $5; 8:30-10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8817.
TEDDY BEAR POKER RUN: Ride to area hospitals and deliver teddy bears for children; followed by a raffle and poker run that ends at Coyote Ranch in Redmond; proceeds benefit Central Oregon ABATE; $5 per hand with teddy bear, $10 per hand without; 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. ride; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-923-3809 or541-815-3600.
PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food, music and more; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-9663 or www.projectconnectco.org.
RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See Sept. 16 for details.
GARDEN OPEN HOUSE: On the Fairgrounds near parking lot D. Share your harvest or horror stories with OSU Central Oregon Master Gardeners. Catch up on fall garden chores, learn about spiders, and what and when to fall prune. Tour the Open Garden and observe labeled landscaping materials that do well in Central Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.
HARVEST CELEBRATION: Activities and displays related to agriculture, irrigation, railroad and the airport. Farmer’s market, food and retail vendors, horse rides, historic activities and games; noon-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond.
POLITICS & BURGERS: The Crooked River Ranch Republicans event featuring several seated legislators and candidates who will share their viewpoints and answer questions. Burgers served at 3 p.m. Music provided by the Sidekicks; suggested donation of $10; 3 p.m.; MacPherson Park, Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-548-1246,541-504-0721 or ranchrepublicans@mac.com.
HARVEST FESTIVAL DINNER: Featuring barbecue and potatoes, live music and historical presentations by Talking Tombstones actors; event will take place across from the park; $25; 5:30-9 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010.
DANCE: Live music by the Party Time Band; members $4, non-members $6; 7-11 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108.
PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-633-6804.

SUNDAY
Sept. 19
RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See Sept. 16 for details.
HARVEST CELEBRATION: Activities and displays related to agriculture, irrigation, railroad and the airport. Farmer’s market, food and retail vendors, horse rides, historic activities and games; noon-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond.

MONDAY
Sept. 20
TOGETHER FOR CHILDREN OPEN HOUSE: Learn about the weekly parent/child program for children from birth through three years; 9:30-11 a.m.; Educational Service District, 1212 N.E. 5th St., in classroom A, Redmond; 541-280-9686,541-389-9317 or www.together-for-children.org.

TUESDAY
Sept. 21
CITY COUNCIL: Redmond City Council meeting, public welcome, 6:45 a.m.; 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave.;agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PUBLIC ART: Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places meeting, public welcome; 4:30 p.m.; conference room A city, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
PLANNING COMMISSION: Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission meeting, public welcome, 7 p.m.; conference room A city, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; agenda at www.ci.redmond.or.us.
BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY: Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship will speak on “Deschutes County Courthouse Records: How to Access and Their Locations”; free, public welcome; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 22
SCHOOL BOARD: Redmond School Board meeting, public welcome; 5:30 p.m., Tumalo Community School; agenda at www.redmond.k12.or.us.
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

THURSDAY
Sept. 23
TEEN THURSDAYS: The library is your space! Come hang out, listen to music, games and drawing supplies available. Free snacks. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1063, mercedesh@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org.

FRIDAY
Sept. 24
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.
CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: Classic and custom cars; 5 p.m.; Great American Furniture, 732 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-4895.
HARVEST MOON FARE: Eight local farmers pair with eight chefs to create a dinner, with entertainment, a live auction and more; registration required; $25; 6:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-548-2380, ext. 144 or www.neighborimpact.org.

SATURDAY
Sept. 25
REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-480-4495.
SHOW & SHINE: Car Show with a barbecue, local vendors and raffle; free, $5 for meal; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126, Powell Butte; 541-548-3066.
I HEART CENTRAL OREGON CELEBRATION: Celebrate the day of service with inspirational speaker Nick Vujicic and a performance by Elliot; free with advance ticket, $10 at the door; 7-9 p.m., doors open 6:20 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-728-3134, elisa@theheartcampaign.com or http://theheartcampaign.com.

SUNDAY
Sept. 26
REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: ABBA-Mania performs ABBA hits, with costume changes and choreography; $35, $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org.
OREGON ARTS COMMISSION OPEN FORUMS: information about the strategic plan for the arts in Oregon; 3:30-5 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 503-986-0082 or kat.bell@state.or.us.

WEDNESDAY
Sept. 29
BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end, Bend; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.

THURSDAY
Sept. 30
TEEN THURSDAYS, DAY OF THE DEAD FIESTA: Decorate sugar skulls and learn about the Day of the Dead celebration. For grades 6-12; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.

Rodeo queen Ps & Qs
The Crooked River Roundup Rodeo Association announces its second annual Queen Scholarship Clinic on Saturday, Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. at the Crook County Fairgrounds indoor arena in Prineville, with special guest speaker 2009 Miss Rodeo Oregon Jackie Gibson.
This clinic is open to young women of all ages who are interested in becoming a rodeo queen. Cost is $50 per applicant and $10 per visitor. Interested applicants can contact Amorita Anstett at 541-604-0994 or e-mail pamorita_@hotmail.com for more information. Applications should be available on the roundup website at www.crookedriverroundup.com under the Queen section.

COCC noncredit catalogue released
Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education department has many classes scheduled in Redmond this fall.
Make Money Buying and Selling on eBay, Yoga, Pilates, and Conversational Spanish are some of the courses being offered.
To register call 541-383-7270 or visit http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore’
The Des Chutes Historical Museum and Lenore Productions announce the return of “An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe” for a fourth year.
Due to popular demand, the event is moving to the Old Stone Church as well as expanding to include a third night. Tickets go on sale Oct. 1 at the Des Chutes Historical Museum for three shows, Oct. 29-31. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 day of show. Doors open at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m.
The event, which benefits the Des Chutes Historical Museum, features Mr. Edgar Allan Poe reading and discussing his works with the audience, a role brought to life by actor Alastair Jacques. Each of the three nights will be unique, the exception being Poe’s most famous work, “The Raven,” which will be performed each of the three nights. Children 10 and older are welcome to attend.
Informtion: www.deschutes
history.org , 541-389-1813.

Flu shot proceeds to benefit tot care
Community flu shot clinics are being offered by HealthWise Inc. HealthWise is a local health management company with a history in Central Oregon for more than 20 years. The shots will be provided for adults and children over the age of 9 years in Redmond on Sept. 16 and Oct. 1 from noon to 6 p.m. at the Big R Store and on Sept. 23 from noon to 6 p.m. at Great American Furniture.
The cost for each flu shot is $25. Medicare B, Clear One and Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon are all accepted.
A portion of the proceeds will benefit and support Healthy Beginnings, a nonprofit organization that provides free health and developmental screenings to children birth through five years throughout Deschutes County. Call 541-383-6357 for information about Healthy Beginning’s free screenings or to volunteer. You can also visit www.myhb.org and find additional information regarding the flu shot schedule as well as additional information about the screening services. For more information regarding the flu shots call HealthWise at 541-389-7211.

Learn website and graphic design
COCC’s Community Learning department is offering two Flash Animation classes and a graphic design series in Bend this fall.
Flash Animation, Beginning will be offered at the Bend COCC Campus Saturday, Oct. 2 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $59.
Flash Animation, Intermediate will be offered at the Bend COCC Campus on two Saturday mornings, Oct. 16 and 23 from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $59.
The Graphic Design Fundamentals series is made up of four separate courses running from Oct. 1 through Nov. 30.
Composition will be offered Friday mornings, Oct. 1, 8 and 15 from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $99.
Illustrator, Beginning will be offered Thursday evenings, Oct. 21, 28 and Nov. 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. Cost is $99.
Make It Visual will be offered Friday morning, Nov. 12 from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $49.
Using InDesign, Beginning will be offered Tuesday and Thursday evenings, Nov. 16, 18 and 30 from 6 to 9 p.m. Cost is $99.
Participants can sign up for classes individually or take the whole series for only $299. Location is the COCC Bend campus. Pre-registration is required for all sessions. Call 541-383-7270 or visit http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

September 14, 2010

Obituaries

Darrell Gene Turner, of Redmond
Oct. 27, 1931 - Sept. 7, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
Funeral was held Sept. 14 at Daniels Chapel of the Valley in La Grande, followed by interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery in Baker City.
Contributions may be made to: AirLink Critical Care Transport
2500 NE Neff Rd. Bend, OR 97701

Sharon "Sheri" Grace Reynolds of Culver
Aug. 28, 1941 to Aug. 29, 2010
Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
Memorial service held Sept. 16 at Madras Christian Church

Robert R. Burdick, of Terrebonne
Feb. 21, 1951 - Sept. 5, 2010

Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel
541-548-3219, www.redmondmemorial.com
Celebration of Life was held Sept. 12, 2010 in Bend, OR

Philip Rodney Youngblood Jr., of Redmond
May 6, 1961 - Sept. 2, 2010

Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond
541-504-9485; www.autumnfunerals.net
No services are scheduled

Frank W. Gasperetti, of Redmond
Sept. 25, 1970 - Sept. 8, 2010

Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel
541-548-3219; www.redmondmemorial.com
A private family service will be held at a later date.