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This photograph shows the trestle or false work which were used to support the structure of the Crooked River Crossing on North Unit Project in 1945 before concrete placings were completed.

100 years ago

Sept. 14, 1920 — Bend Bulletin Urges Fair Attendance

Commenting editorially upon the approach of fair time in Central Oregon, the Bend Bulletin, urging the value of exhibitions and attending agriculture fairs, said:

Fair time in Central Oregon approaches. Next week the Oregon Interstate fair will be held in Prineville and shortly after the people of Redmond will open their new fair grounds for the annual potato show, enlarged and broadened in an effort to turn the event into an annual county fair. These fairs are a valuable feature of community life and it is to be hoped that they will be well patronized.

William McMurray of the O.W.R & N. Co. has recently urged attendance on the fairs saying that it is a duty of every citizen to attend and participate. Mr. McMurray continues:

“We are surely living in an age of improvement, especially betterment of living conditions, and he who succeeds best, whether in commercial or agricultural life, or indeed any line of business, should become familiar with the ideas and methods of those who are succeeding. I know of no place where it can be done to greater advantage than at the fair.

“The farmer has the opportunity of comparing the various animals, grains, fruits and vegetables, and there is no better school in which to study methods of handling animals and crops necessary to insure the best results. The merchant and manufacturer have the same invaluable privilege,and they can get more real benefit from the exhibits of one good fair than they could from a year of travel and investigation.

“one of the strongest educational features of all fairs is the prominence now being given to boys’ and girls’ club work. These exhibits of garden products, poultry, pigs, calves, school room work, or other lines of industry are not only educational, but they arouse interest and create an ambition and enthusiasm that makes their work a pleasure instead of drudgery and inspires them to persevere.

“Every citizen engaged in any line of industry, whether farmer or manufacturer, or what not will be benefited by becoming an exhibitor. He will not only inform his neighbors of his success and prove himself worth while but he will be studying the exhibits of all the others and profiting by their experiences. Every exhibitor who contributes to the display, the enlightenment and education of his neighbors, becomes thereby a better citizen, and his respect for himself and his business will be enhanced in proportion.

“This in my opinion, in particularly true of the farmer. There is no place where a farmer and his family can obtain more practical ideas pertaining to their work than at these annual fairs. They create a community spirit and stimulate the co-operative idea.

“In short, I would say to all: Be sure to attend one or more fairs this season, not only for pleasure, but for profit, rest, recreation, and as a public duty. You will feel better for having done so.”

The story is continued on www.redmondspokesman.com.

The contract provides for two concrete abutments 266 feet apart on either side of the canyon 75 feet below the rim. To excavate for these abutments it was necessary for the contractor to construct roads into the canyon to provide for the transportation of his equipment into the bottom of the canyon, across the river, adn 50 feet up the north side of the canyon wall.

Considerable difficulty was encountered in the construction of abutment No. 2, as this abutment penetrated into the cliff some seven feet, which left an overhang of disintegrated and loose rock having a tendency to dislodge and fall into the canyon below.

The false work consists of approximately 45 bents, each bent being 20 feet wide at the top, battered to the extreme width of 48 feet at the bottom.

To span the river above the high water line, it was necessary to construct four large trusses, 40 feet long and 14 feet in height, composed of 16 inch by 22 inch timbers.

The plan adopted for the construction of the false work was to prefabricate each bent into 30 foot sections, handling each section with a crane working at the rim of the canyon and another crane working on the false work The prefabrication yard was located adjacent to the structure. Each 30 foot bend was lifted up by the crane working on the rim of the canyon and passed ot the crane working on the false work, lowering the section into place.

Upon completion the structure will resemble that of a bridge in appearance. After removal of the false work the observer will see a bent or pier on either side rising from the abutment at right angles to the flume. Additional support for the structure will be the bridge type struts running from the abutments on each side to the center of the flume.

The principal quantities for this work consists of 4200 yards of rock and earth excavation, 2450 cubic yards of concrete, 41,200 pounds of reinforcing steel, 330,000 board feet of timber and approximately 20 tons of bolds, washer and tie rods for the false work.

This crossing was originally designed of structural steel, but because of restrictions placed on this type of work by the War Production board, the steel structure was abandoned early in 1942 and the WPB later gave approval to the construction of the crossing out of reinforced concrete. The structure was designed in the Bureau of Reclamation office in Denver, Colo. under McBirney by Saylor. The construction is under the direction of S.H. Spencer, construction engineer of the Bureau of Reclamation field office in Bend. Speed Leonard is in charge of actual construction for the government, adn Merle Sleeper of Portland is the engineer in charge of erection of the false work. Floyd Neil of Portland is the general foreman.

Richardson states that concrete placings can be completed by November 30 providing an adequate labor supply can be obtained.

75 years ago

Sept. 13, 1945 — D.A. Richardson Builds North Unit Flume to Cross Crooked River Gorge

Spanning Crooked river gorge at a height of 160 feet above the water line is the flume for the North Unit canal being constructed by D.A. Richardson, general contractor, of Santa Cruz, Cal. The contract was awarded on June 20, since which time workmen have completed the false work, as shown in the photograph. Concrete placing operations for the main structure will begin about September 20.

The contract provides for the construction of a 10 foot by nine foot , six inch flume, 521 feet long, spanning from rim to rim the Crooked River gorge approximately four miles east of Terrebonne.

Wending its way toward Culver the main canal enters the flume at the south side of the gorge through an open transition 80 feet in length. Leading off from the transition is the wasteway to be operated by a radial gate.. Upon crossing the gorge the canal flows out of the flume through an 80-foot outlet transition of warped concrete.

Visible in the photograph is the 14-foot roadway with guard rails along the entire length of the structure. Upon completion, the flume will make its crossing just below the roadway.

As this bridge type flume is constructed of reinforced concrete, it was necessary that false work be constructed with bents at 10 foot centers filling the entire gorge with a wooden trestle. This trestle, or false work, is to be used to support the reinforced concrete spans until the completion of all the concrete placings.

The story is continued on www.redmondspokesman.com.

The contract provides for two concrete abutments 266 feet apart on either side of the canyon 75 feet below the rim. To excavate for these abutments it was necessary for the contractor to construct roads into the canyon to provide for the transportation of his equipment into the bottom of the canyon, across the river, adn 50 feet up the north side of the canyon wall.

Considerable difficulty was encountered in the construction of abutment No. 2, as this abutment penetrated into the cliff some seven feet, which left an overhang of disintegrated and loose rock having a tendency to dislodge and fall into the canyon below.

The false work consists of approximately 45 bents, each bent being 20 feet wide at the top, battered to the extreme width of 48 feet at the bottom.

To span the river above the high water line, it was necessary to construct four large trusses, 40 feet long and 14 feet in height, composed of 16 inch by 22 inch timbers.

The plan adopted for the construction of the false work was to prefabricate each bent into 30 foot sections, handling each section with a crane working at the rim of the canyon and another crane working on the false work The prefabrication yard was located adjacent to the structure. Each 30 foot bend was lifted up by the crane working on the rim of the canyon and passed ot the crane working on the false work, lowering the section into place.

Upon completion the structure will resemble that of a bridge in appearance. After removal of the false work the observer will see a bent or pier on either side rising from the abutment at right angles to the flume. Additional support for the structure will be the bridge type struts running from the abutments on each side to the center of the flume.

The principal quantities for this work consists of 4200 yards of rock and earth excavation, 2450 cubic yards of concrete, 41,200 pounds of reinforcing steel, 330,000 board feet of timber and approximately 20 tons of bolds, washer and tie rods for the false work.

This crossing was originally designed of structural steel, but because of restrictions placed on this type of work by the War Production board, the steel structure was abandoned early in 1942 and the WPB later gave approval to the construction of the crossing out of reinforced concrete. The structure was designed in the Bureau of Reclamation office in Denver, Colo. under McBirney by Saylor. The construction is under the direction of S.H. Spencer, construction engineer of the Bureau of Reclamation field office in Bend. Speed Leonard is in charge of actual construction for the government, adn Merle Sleeper of Portland is the engineer in charge of erection of the false work. Floyd Neil of Portland is the general foreman.

Richardson states that concrete placings can be completed by November 30 providing an adequate labor supply can be obtained.

50 years ago

Sept. 9, 1970 — School budget passes 2 to 1

Largest number of voters ever to turn out at a school election passed the Redmond district’s operating budget last Thursday by more than two-to-one.

Final count was 1452 yes and 716 no. Every polling place favored the budget except Cloverdale and there it failed by only one vote.

Announcing that school will start Monday, Sept. 14, Supt. Paul C. Eggleston said: “A lot of people worked hard to pass the budget and get our school open. Now it’s up to the board and those of us who are employed by the school district to make sure that the confidence of the community is not misplaced.”

The budget calls for a total levy of $1,607,947.09, all outside of the 6% limitation, since the consolidated district has no tax baxe. Maximum tax rate will not exceed $18.92 per thousand dollars of true cash value.

The Sept. 3 vote marked the fourth time Redmond School District had presented an operating budget. The first was defeated 1315 to 472. It called for a levy of $1,898,294.05 or $22.60 per thousand dollars of true cash value. On the second try June 25, there were the same number of yes votes, 472, with 799 no’s. At that time the district asked $1,826,560.71 or $21.59 per thousand dollars.

The budget failed by only 26 votes Aug. 6, with 687 yes and 715 no. The proposed levy then was reduced to $1,651,213.74 or $19.72 per thousand dollars.

Preceding the fourth election, public meets were held, television and radio programs were conducted and much publicity was given to every phase of the school’s operation.

The story is continued on www.redmondspokesman.com.

The contract provides for two concrete abutments 266 feet apart on either side of the canyon 75 feet below the rim. To excavate for these abutments it was necessary for the contractor to construct roads into the canyon to provide for the transportation of his equipment into the bottom of the canyon, across the river, adn 50 feet up the north side of the canyon wall.

Considerable difficulty was encountered in the construction of abutment No. 2, as this abutment penetrated into the cliff some seven feet, which left an overhang of disintegrated and loose rock having a tendency to dislodge and fall into the canyon below.

The false work consists of approximately 45 bents, each bent being 20 feet wide at the top, battered to the extreme width of 48 feet at the bottom.

To span the river above the high water line, it was necessary to construct four large trusses, 40 feet long and 14 feet in height, composed of 16 inch by 22 inch timbers.

The plan adopted for the construction of the false work was to prefabricate each bent into 30 foot sections, handling each section with a crane working at the rim of the canyon and another crane working on the false work The prefabrication yard was located adjacent to the structure. Each 30 foot bend was lifted up by the crane working on the rim of the canyon and passed ot the crane working on the false work, lowering the section into place.

Upon completion the structure will resemble that of a bridge in appearance. After removal of the false work the observer will see a bent or pier on either side rising from the abutment at right angles to the flume. Additional support for the structure will be the bridge type struts running from the abutments on each side to the center of the flume.

The principal quantities for this work consists of 4200 yards of rock and earth excavation, 2450 cubic yards of concrete, 41,200 pounds of reinforcing steel, 330,000 board feet of timber and approximately 20 tons of bolds, washer and tie rods for the false work.

This crossing was originally designed of structural steel, but because of restrictions placed on this type of work by the War Production board, the steel structure was abandoned early in 1942 and the WPB later gave approval to the construction of the crossing out of reinforced concrete. The structure was designed in the Bureau of Reclamation office in Denver, Colo. under McBirney by Saylor. The construction is under the direction of S.H. Spencer, construction engineer of the Bureau of Reclamation field office in Bend. Speed Leonard is in charge of actual construction for the government, adn Merle Sleeper of Portland is the engineer in charge of erection of the false work. Floyd Neil of Portland is the general foreman.

Richardson states that concrete placings can be completed by November 30 providing an adequate labor supply can be obtained.

25 years ago

Sept. 13, 1995 — New addition lands at airport

Carrie Novick has been downright giddy lately. And with good reason.

Redmond’s airport manager has a front-row seat for the long-awaited raising of a flight control tower to be operated by the Federal Aviation Administration.

“This changes the entire landscape here,” said Novick, a former flight controller herself, during Monday’s rapid rise of the tower frame.

She led the intensive, five-year lobbying effort to bring the FAA tower to town. Costing $3.64 million, the structure will soon have a cab on top, making it the area’s tallest building at 85 feet.

For Novick, seeing the tower finally go up after years of federal fiscal uncertainty for the project satisfies a personal goal. Once operational, the tower also will bring relief on the safety front.

Commercial airline pilots reported three near-collisions at Redmond Airport in the past five years. More averted tragedies may not have been reported to officials.

According to Novick, each one of the three reported incidents involved aircraft with no radios veering too close to passenger planes landing or departing. “If it’s you and your family on that plane, it’s one too many,” she said.

The control tower, being erected and to be staffed entirely by federal funds, will replace the now-obsolete flight service station at the airport. The station, established like hundreds of others across the country early this century, only provides pilots weather and local traffic conditions upon request.

“That’s holding onto yesterday’s technology,” Novick said. “You can’t do that.”

The new control tower will monitor and control air traffic within a five-mile radius. It also will be responsible for aircraft on the ground.

Some pilots have complained that the tower is unnecessary wand will intrude on their freedom.

“Some people don’t like to be told what to do,” she said. “Some don’t like to follow the rules.”

But Novick said the safety of all who fly in and out of Redmond, whether on commercial or private flights, outweighs all other concerns.

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