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Letters to the editor

Redmond City Councilor Krisann Clark-Endicott is being raked over the coals for expressing her opinion that “biological males don’t belong in girls’ sports.” One commenter called Clark-Endicott’s position “clearly bigoted.” Another called it “transphobic.”

In fact, it is neither. It is a sensible viewpoint shared by many if not most Americans — namely, that biological men who declare that they’re women, but haven’t undergone any hormonal or medical treatment, shouldn't be allowed to compete in women’s sports.

Given the average sex differences in bone and muscle mass, and in strength and speed, this simply wouldn’t be fair to the competing women. Even with hormonal treatments biological males don’t lose all of the differential muscle mass that they gain at puberty.

Several places, including the state of Connecticut, do allow unaltered biological men who identify as women to compete in women’s sports. The results are predictable — the women-identifying men clean up the prizes. Why? Because, put simply, there are sex differences in athletics; if there weren’t, we wouldn’t have separate categories for women’s and men’s sports.

Biology doesn’t care about what pronouns we use. There are creative strategies we can implement to invite, and even celebrate, the participation of trans athletes in all sports. But they can be implemented only once we admit the real differences that exist between the two — and only two — sexes.

— Gary Miranda, Redmond

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